Floyd, Arkansas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
unincorporated community
Floyd is located in Arkansas
Location within Arkansas
Coordinates: 35°11′28.67″N 91°58′03.20″W / 35.1912972°N 91.9675556°W / 35.1912972; -91.9675556Coordinates: 35°11′28.67″N 91°58′03.20″W / 35.1912972°N 91.9675556°W / 35.1912972; -91.9675556
Country United States
State Arkansas
County White County
Founded 1842
Incorporated N/A
 • County Judge Michael Lincoln
 • Justice of the Peace Cameron Cooper
Elevation 358 ft (109 m)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)

Floyd is an unincorporated community in western White County, Arkansas. The rural community is situated along Highways 31 and 305, in addition to the county-maintained El Paso Road. Though relatively small, the community maintains a variety of activities and institutions throughout the year, notably its annual parade and display of fireworks during Independence Day.

Geography and History[edit]

Lacking exact boundaries, Floyd is located within Coffey Township, in western White County. The largest part of the community today is located approximately 11 miles northwest of Beebe, Arkansas. Among the earliest settlers in the area was James Barnett and his family in 1842 [1]; nearby Lake Barnett shares the name of these pioneers. Another indicator of the community's longevity is the first local cemetery, which was used as early as December 1865, when Jesse Levi Akin was the first person buried in what is now the Old Floyd Cemetery.


While Floyd maintained a separate school district in its earlier years, the community today is served by the Beebe Public School District. The former school cafeteria still stands along the east side of Highway 31, and has served as a community center for many years since consolidation of the school district.

In addition, the community hosts a chapter of the Extension Homemakers Clubs, an outreach of the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture's Cooperative Extension Service. Through the local EH Club, topics of improving community and family dynamics are often addressed through workshops, regular monthly member meetings, and participation in exhibitions such as the annual White County Fair and Livestock Show. Similarly, the community also offers a 4-H chapter for area youth educational enhancement.

External links[edit]