Fluoroacetone

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Fluoroacetone
Fluoroacetone skeletal.svg
Names
IUPAC name
1-Fluoropropan-2-one
Other names
Fluoroacetone; 1-fluoro-2-propanone
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.006.423 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 207-064-0
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C3H5FO/c1-3(5)2-4/h2H2,1H3
    Key: MSWVMWGCNZQPIA-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC(=O)CF
Properties
C3H5FO
Molar mass 76.070 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless liquid
Density 1.054 g/mL
Boiling point 75 °C (167 °F; 348 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS02: Flammable GHS06: Toxic
Danger
H225, H300, H310, H330
P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P260, P262, P264, P270, P271, P280, P284, P301+P310, P302+P350, P303+P361+P353, P304+P340, P310, P320, P321, P322, P330, P361, P363, P370+P378, P403+P233, P403+P235, P405, P501
Flash point 7 °C (45 °F; 280 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Fluoroacetone is an organofluorine compound with the chemical formula C
3
H
5
FO
.[1][2] In contrast to trifluoroacetone, the compound has one fluorine atom. Under normal conditions, the substance is a colorless liquid. Fluoroacetone is also a highly toxic and flammable compound.[3] Fumes of fluoroacetone can form an explosive mixture with air.

Synthesis[edit]

Fluoroacetone can be obtained by a reaction of triethylamine trihydrofluoride with bromoacetone.

Applications[edit]

Fluoroacetone is used as a catalyst to study the kinetics of the ketone-catalysed decomposition of peroxymonosulfuric acid (Caro's acid).[4] It is also a precursor material for the production of higher fluoroketones.

Fluoroacetone has not been used as a lachrymatory substance in contrast to other halogenated acetone derivatives, such as bromoacetone or chloroacetone.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fluoroacetone Basic information". chemicalbook.com. Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  2. ^ Newallis, Peter E.; Lombardo, Pasquale (1965). "Fluoro Ketones. III. Preparation and Thermal Decomposition of Fluoroacetone Hemiketal Esters". J. Org. Chem. 30 (11): 3834–3837. doi:10.1021/jo01022a055.
  3. ^ "Substance information". echa.europa.eu. Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  4. ^ "Fluoroacetone". Sigma Aldrich. sigmaaldrich.com. Retrieved 1 June 2017.