Flying Cowboys

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Flying Cowboys
Flyingcowboys.jpg
Studio album by Rickie Lee Jones
Released September 26, 1989
Genre Alternative
Length 55:17
Label Geffen
Producer Walter Becker
Rickie Lee Jones chronology
The Magazine
(1984)The Magazine1984
Flying Cowboys
(1989)
Pop Pop
(1991)Pop Pop1991

Flying Cowboys is an album by Rickie Lee Jones that was released in September 1989 and produced by Walter Becker of Steely Dan.

Genesis[edit]

After the release of The Magazine in 1984, Jones retreated from the limelight. She married Pascal Nabet Meyer and gave birth to daughter Charlotte Rose in 1988 while working on her fourth full-length studio album.

Jones and Nabet Meyer had been writing and working together on new material for several years before the recording work commenced in 1988, with Becker as producer. Jones had expressed admiration for the work of Steely Dan, particularly their album The Royal Scam (1976).

Promotional copies of Flying Cowboys were packaged with an interview with Jones conducted by an unknown individual (previously misidentified as LeVar Burton). This interview is the source for a passage that is extensively sampled on British electronic group The Orb's 1990 hit "Little Fluffy Clouds".[1][2]

Reviews[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[3]
Robert Christgau (B)[4]
Rolling Stone 4/5 stars[5]

St. Petersburg Times, Oct. 13, 1989 (4/5) – "[She] embraces adulthood and real life without sacrificing her cool, bohemian edge."

Time, Oct. 23, 1989 – "In Flying Cowboys...she sets down a kind of mystical confessional, full of allusive autobiography and reflective nonchalance. It has the breadth of an important book and the emotional impact of great rock 'n' roll."

Rolling Stone, Nov. 2, 1989 (4/5) – "While it explores a wealth of themes and musical styles, the album unfolds with the ongoing grace of one long song. What provides unity to the album's varied elements is its seductive rhythmic flow, the down-home surrealism of Jones's lyrics, the clarity and intelligence of Walter Becker's production and, of course, the sensual elasticity of Jones's extraordinary singing."

The New York Times, Dec. 24, 1989 – Best of 1989 – "Ms. Jones's newest suite of enigmatic dream songs drenched in personal mythology is an eccentric tour de force, as rich in imagery as it is self-dramatizing."

Track listing[edit]

All tracks composed by Rickie Lee Jones; except where indicated

  1. "The Horses" (Walter Becker, Jones) – 4:47
  2. "Just My Baby" (Jones, Pascal Nabet-Meyer) – 4:44
  3. "Ghetto of My Mind" (Jones, Nabet-Meyer) – 6:12
  4. "Rodeo Girl" – 4:50
  5. "Satellites" – 4:54
  6. "Ghost Train" – 4:16
  7. "Flying Cowboys" (Sal Bernardi, Jones, Nabet-Meyer) – 5:02
  8. "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying" (Les Chadwick, Leo Maguire, Gerry Marsden, Freddie Marsden) – 4:13
  9. "Love Is Gonna Bring Us Back Alive" (Jones, Nabet-Meyer) – 4:51
  10. "Away from the Sky" – 5:30
  11. "Atlas' Marker" – 5:58

Charts[edit]

Album - Billboard

Year Chart Position
1989 The Billboard 200 39

Singles - Billboard

Year Single Chart Position
1989 "Satellites" Modern Rock Tracks 23

Personnel[edit]

Technical[edit]

  • Producer: Walter Becker, Executive Producers: Gary Gersh, Pascal Nabet Meyer
  • Engineers: Greg Penny, Roger Nicols, Mark Linett, Lavant Coppock, Roger Hart

Musicians[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goodes, Grant (1999-02-16). "Rickie Lee Jones Sample in LFC Confirmed". KLF Online. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. 
  2. ^ McCusker, Eamonn (2003-10-15). "The Orb - Adventures Beyond the Ultraworld". CD Times. 
  3. ^ Allmusic review
  4. ^ Robert Christgau review
  5. ^ Rolling Stone review Archived November 12, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]