Folk belief

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Folk beliefs)
Jump to: navigation, search

In folkloristics, folk belief or folk-belief is a broad genre of folklore. This category includes a wide variety of behaviors, expressions, and beliefs. Examples of concepts included in this genre are magic, superstition, popular belief, folk religion, planting signs, hoodoo, conjuration, charms, root work, taboos, old wives' tales, omens, portents, the supernatural and folk medicine.[1]

Folk belief and associated behaviors are strongly evidenced among all elements of society, regardless of education level or income. In turn, folk belief is found in an agricultural, suburban, and urban environments alike.[2]

Etymology[edit]

One of a variety of compounds extending from the coinage of the term folklore in 1846 (previously popular antiquities), the term folk-belief is first evidenced in use by British folklorist Laurence Gomme in 1892.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Green (1997:89).
  2. ^ Green (1997:97).
  3. ^ "folk, n." OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2016. Web. 3 November 2016. See also "folklore, n." OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2016. Web. 3 November 2016.

References[edit]

  • Green, Thomas A. (1997). Folklore: An Encyclopedia of Beliefs, Customs, Tales, Music, and Art. Vol. 1. ABC-CLIO.