Foolscap folio

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A comparison of the A4 and Foolscap folio papersize

Foolscap folio (commonly contracted to foolscap or folio and in short FC) is paper cut to the size of 8 12 × 13 12 in (216 × 343 mm) for printing or to 8 × 13 in (203 × 330 mm) for "normal" writing paper (foolscap).[1] This was a traditional paper size used in Europe and the British Commonwealth, before the adoption of the international standard A4 paper.

A full (plano) foolscap[2] paper sheet is actually 13 12 × 17 in (343 × 432 mm) in size, and a folio sheet of any type is half the base sheet size.

Foolscap folio
Name inch × inch mm × mm AR Characteristic
Foolscap folio 8½ × 13½ 216 × 343 ª 1:1.5879 Imperial (half foolscap), printing
Foolscap folio 8 × 13 203 × 330 1:1.6256 Traditional British, writing

ª Approximate measure in current use in Latin America: 216 x 341 mm.


Ring binders or lever arch files designed to hold foolscap folios are often used to hold A4 paper (210 × 297 mm, 8 14 × 11 34 in). The slightly larger size of such a binder offers greater protection to the edges of the pages it contains.

History[edit]

Foolscap was named after the fool's cap and bells watermark commonly used from the fifteenth century onwards on paper of these dimensions.[3][4] The earliest example of such paper was made in Germany in 1479. Unsubstantiated anecdotes suggest that this watermark was introduced to England in 1580 by John Spilman, a German who established a papermill at Dartford, Kent.[5] Apocryphally, the Rump Parliament substituted a fool's cap for the royal arms as a watermark on the paper used for the journals of Parliament.[citation needed]

Oficio (mexican)[edit]

In Mexico, the foolscap folio paper size 8 12 by 13 12 inches (216 mm × 343 mm) / (21.6 cm x 34 cm) [6] is named (locally) oficio.

F4[edit]

F4 is a paper size 210 mm × 330 mm (8.27 in × 13.0 in).[7] Although metric, based on the A4 paper size, and named to suggest that it is part of the official ISO 216 paper sizes, it is only a de facto standard.

It is often referred to as "foolscap" or "folio" because of its similarity to the traditional foolscap folio size of 8 12 in × 13 12 in (216 mm × 343 mm).

References[edit]

  1. ^ PaperSizes, ‘foolscap’ is an alias for foolscap folio.
  2. ^ PaperSize, ‘Foolscap’ Paper Size Dimensions, Imperial.
  3. ^ Müller, Lothar (2014). White Magic: The Age of Paper. Cambridge: Polity Press. p. 173.
  4. ^ Anon. "Foolscap". The Free Dictionary. Farlex Inc. Retrieved 17 September 2009.
  5. ^ Anon. "Entry in the Dartford Holy Trinity parish register for Sir John Spielman (Spillman), 8 November 1626". Medway: City Ark Document Gallery. Medway Council. Retrieved 17 September 2009.
  6. ^ Photo of foolscap folio paper (* Mexican).
  7. ^ Prographic paper sizes Archived July 4, 2004, at the Wayback Machine

External links[edit]

THE COLLATION a gathering of scholarship from the Folger Library showing image of Foolscap folio watermark