Football records and statistics in England

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This article concerns football records in England. Unless otherwise stated, records are taken from the Football League or Premier League. Where a different record exists for the top flight (Football League First Division 1888–1992, and Premier League 1992–present), this is also given.

National team[edit]

League[edit]

Records in this section refer to the English Football Pyramid

Titles[edit]

Top-flight appearances[edit]

Representation[edit]

Wins[edit]

Draws[edit]

Losses[edit]

Points[edit]

Games without a win[edit]

Games without defeat[edit]

Goals[edit]

Scorelines[edit]

Disciplinary[edit]

Both players came on as a substitute and elbowed/pushed an opponent before the game had been restarted.

Transfers[edit]

Individual[edit]

Appearances[edit]

Goals[edit]

FA Cup[edit]

Final[edit]

Team[edit]

Individual[edit]

All rounds[edit]

  • Top scorers
As of 2 July 2021[41]

The table includes all players to have scored 20 or more goals.

Rank Player Goals Apps Ratio Years Club(s)
1 England Harry Cursham 49 44 1.11 1877–1888 Notts County
2 Wales Ian Rush 44 75 0.59 1979–1998 Chester City, Liverpool, Newcastle United
3 Scotland Denis Law 43 63 0.67 1956–1974 Huddersfield Town, Manchester United, Manchester City
4 England Jimmy Greaves 42 57 0.74 1958–1979 Chelsea, Tottenham Hotspur, West Ham United, Barnet
5 England Steve Bloomer 39 55 0.71 1893–1914 Derby County, Middlesbrough
6 England Allan Clarke 35 66 0.39 1964–1980 Walsall, Fulham, Leicester City, Leeds United, Barnsley
7 England Dixie Dean 33 36 0.92 1924–1938 Tranmere Rovers, Everton,
England George Brown 33 32 1.03 1921–1935 Huddersfield Town, Aston Villa, Burnley F.C
8 Scotland Archie Hunter 32 41 0.78 1879–1890 Aston Villa
9 England Stan Mortensen 31 38 0.82 1956–1957 Blackpool, Hull City
10 England Teddy Sheringham 30 56 0.54 1986–2008 Millwall, Nottingham Forest, Tottenham Hotspur, Manchester United, Portsmouth, West Ham United, Colchester United
England Ronnie Allen 30 61 0.49 1946–1963 Port Vale, West Bromwich Albion, Crystal Palace
England Raich Carter 30 60 0.5 1931–1952 Sunderland, Derby County, Hull City
England Tommy Browell 30 38 0.79 1911–1930 Everton, Manchester City, Blackpool
England Billy Walker 30 53 0.57 1919–1933 Aston Villa
14 England Malcolm Macdonald 29 36 0.81 1969–1979 Luton Town, Newcastle United, Arsenal
England Bobby Smith 29 40 0.73 1955–1964 Chelsea, Tottenham Hotspur
England Arthur Rowley 29 52 0.56 1949–1963 Leicester City, Shrewsbury Town
17 England Frank Lampard 28 78 0.36 1996–2014 West Ham United, Chelsea, Manchester City
England Nat Lofthouse 28 49 0.56 1946–1960 Bolton Wanderers
17 England Alan Shearer 27 58 0.47 1990–2006 Southampton, Blackburn Rovers, Newcastle United
England John Barnes 27 87 0.31 1981–1998 Watford, Liverpool, Newcastle United
England Tony Brown 27 54 0.5 1963–1981 West Bromwich Albion
England Roy Bentley 27 75 0.36 1949–1962 Bristol City, Newcastle United, Chelsea, Fulham, Queens Park Rangers
England Jack Rowley 27 44 0.61 1937–1957 Manchester United, Plymouth Argyle
England David Jack 27 52 0.52 1920–1934 Bolton Wanderers, Arsenal
England Harry Hampton 27 37 0.73 1904–1922 Aston Villa, Birmingham City, Newport County
25 Wales Mark Hughes 26 72 0.36 1984–2002 Manchester United, Chelsea, Southampton, Blackburn Rovers
England W.G. Richardson 26 34 0.76 1929–1949 West Bromwich Albion
England Cliff Bastin 26 46 0.57 1929–1947 Arsenal
28 England Bobby Tambling 25 36 0.69 1960–1969 Chelsea
Scotland David Herd 25 53 0.47 1954–1969 Arsenal, Manchester United, Stoke City
England Joe Smith 25 43 0.58 1910–1929 Bolton Wanderers
Scotland John Campbell 25 19 1.32 1890–1897 Sunderland
30 England Paul Mariner 24 45 0.53 1974–1986 Plymouth Argyle, Ipswich Town, Arsenal
England John Richards 24 44 0.55 1969–1983 Wolverhampton Wanderers
33 England Wayne Rooney 23 49 0.47 2004–2020 Everton, Manchester United, Derby County
England Dion Dublin 23 54 0.43 1988–2008 Cambridge United, Manchester United, Coventry City, Aston Villa, Leicester City, Norwich City
England Jimmy Greenhoff 23 65 0.35 1964–1980 Leeds United, Birmingham City, Stoke City, Manchester United
England Geoff Hurst 23 29 0.79 1961–1975 West Ham United, Stoke City
England Jackie Milburn 23 44 0.52 1946–1956 Newcastle United
England Tom Finney 23 40 0.58 1947–1960 Preston North End
England Bobby Gurney 23 40 0.58 1925–1950 Sunderland
36 England Fred Tilson 22 28 0.79 1928–1938 Manchester City
England Jermain Defoe 22 39 0.56 2001–2016 West Ham United, Bournemouth, Tottenham Hotspur, Sunderland
Republic of Ireland Frank Stapleton 22 51 0.43 1974–1987 Arsenal, Manchester United
England Peter Beardsley 22 62 0.35 1979–1997 Carslile United, Newcastle United, Liverpool, Everton
40 England Clive Allen 21 33 0.64 1978–1994 QPR, Tottenham Hotspur, Manchester City, Chelsea, West Ham United
England Lee Chapman 21 46 0.46 1980–1994 Stoke City, Arsenal, Sunderland, Sheffield Wednesday, Nottingham Forest, Leeds United, West Ham United
England Mick Jones 21 36 0.58 1964–1974 Sheffield United, Leeds United
Scotland Alan Gilzean 21 40 0.53 1964–1974 Tottenham Hotspur
Northern Ireland George Best 21 48 0.44 1964–1977 Manchester United, Fulham
England Stan Pearson 21 30 0.7 1938–1954 Manchester United
Scotland Jimmy Ross 21 36 0.58 1888–1902 Preston North End, Liverpool, Burnley, Manchester City
48 Argentina Sergio Agüero 20 22 0.91 2011–2021 Manchester City
England Kevin Phillips 20 42 0.48 1995–2013 Watford, Sunderland, Southampton, Aston Villa, West Bromwich Albion, Birmingham City, Blackpool
Trinidad and Tobago Dwight Yorke 20 42 0.48 1990–2009 Aston Villa, Manchester United, Blackburn Rovers, Birmingham City, Sunderland
Scotland Graeme Sharp 20 54 0.37 1980–1991 Everton
Scotland Peter Lorimer 20 59 0.34 1965–1985 Leeds United
England Peter Osgood 20 46 0.43 1966–1977 Chelsea, Southampton
Guernsey Len Duquemin 20 33 0.61 1946–1957 Tottenham Hotspur
England George Camsell 20 35 0.57 1926–1939 Middlesbrough
Scotland Sandy Brown 20 16 1.25 1900–1905 Tottenham Hotspur, Middlesbrough

League Cup[edit]

Final[edit]

All rounds[edit]

All time top scorers[edit]

Rank Player Goals Apps Ratio Years Club(s)
1 Wales Ian Rush 49 82 0.6 1980–1998 Liverpool, Leeds United, Newcastle United
2 England Geoff Hurst 49 60 0.82 1961–1975 West Ham United, Stoke City
3 Republic of Ireland John Aldridge 44 62 0.73 1978–1998 Newport County, Oxford United, Liverpool, Tranmere Rovers
4 England Ian Wright 38 50 0.76 1986–1999 Crystal Palace, Arsenal, West Ham United
5 England Tony Cottee 35 62 0.56 1982–2001 West Ham United, Everton, Leicester City, Norwich City
6 England Robbie Fowler 33 44 0.75 1993–2009 Liverpool, Manchester City, Cardiff City, Blackburn Rovers
7 England Alan Shearer 32 50 0.64 1990–2006 Southampton, Blackburn Rovers, Newcastle United
8 Wales Dean Saunders 32 57 0.56 1982–2001 Oxford United, Derby County, Liverpool, Aston Villa, Nottingham Forest, Sheffield United, Bradford
9 Republic of Ireland David Kelly 30 60 0.5 1983–2002 Walsall, West Ham United, Leicester City, Newcastle United, Tranmere Rovers, Sheffield United
10 England Martin Chivers 29 41 0.71 1962–1976 Southampton, Tottenham Hotspur

FA Charity / Community Shield[edit]

Final[edit]

All competitions[edit]

  • Fastest century of goals scored during a Premier League season (in fewest no. of games played): 103 goals scored in 34 games by Manchester City in season 2013–14. Previous record: 100 goals scored in 42 games by Chelsea in season 2012–13 (excludes games played / goals scored in FA Community Shield (1/2), UEFA Super Cup (1/1) and FIFA Club World Cup (2/3)).[23]
  • Fastest century of goals scored during a Premier League season (in elapsed calendar days): 103 goals scored on 18 January 2014 by Manchester City in 2013–14. Previous record: 100 goals scored on 21 February 2013 by Chelsea in season 2012–13 (excludes games played / goals scored in FA Community Shield (1/2), UEFA Super Cup (1/1) and FIFA Club World Cup (2/3)).[23]
  • Most consecutive penalty shoot-out wins: 9 by Bradford City between 6 October 2009 and 11 December 2012[46]
  • Fastest penalty awarded: 6 seconds. Chester v Witton Albion – 13 December 2016. Referee Joseph Johnson awarded a penalty when Blaine Hudson upended Tolani Omotola after 6 seconds.[47]

Attendance records[edit]

List of English record competition winners[edit]

These tables list the clubs that have won honours an English record number of times. It lists all international competitions organised by UEFA and FIFA as well as competitions organised by the English governing bodies the English Football League, the Premier League, and The Football Association.

Ongoing competitions[edit]

English record winners of all ongoing competitions
Competition Record club(s) Total wins Most recent Notes
English champions Manchester United 20 2013 [48]
FA Cup Arsenal 14 2020 [49]
EFL Cup Liverpool 9 2022 [50]
FA Community Shield Manchester United 21 2016 [51]
UEFA Champions League Liverpool 6 2019 [52]
UEFA Europa League Liverpool 3 2001 [53]
UEFA Super Cup Liverpool 4 2019 [54]
FIFA Club World Cup Chelsea, Liverpool and Manchester United 1 2021 [55]

Discontinued competitions[edit]

This table follows the elite criteria above. It also includes any competitions that were not directly run by the governing bodies but were precursors to such competitions. Note: Inter-Cities Fairs Cup was replaced with UEFA Cup and Intercontinental Cup was replaced with FIFA Club World Cup.

English record winners of discontinued competitions
Competition Record club(s) Total wins Most recent Notes
Full Members' Cup Chelsea and Nottingham Forest 2 1992 [56]
Football League Centenary Trophy Arsenal 1 1988 [57]
Sheriff of London Charity Shield Arsenal 4 1965 [51]
Football League Super Cup Liverpool 1 1986
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Chelsea 2 1998 [58]
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup Leeds United 2 1971 [59]
Intercontinental Cup Manchester United 1 1999

Managers[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ GGM 26: Arsenal clinch a hat-trick of titles | News Archive | News | Arsenal.com Archived 20 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "All-time Arsenal". www.arsenal.com.
  3. ^ a b English Football League and F. A. Premier League Tables 1888–2016 by Michael Robinson (2016)
  4. ^ a b c d e f "England - First Level All-Time Tables". RSSSF.com. Retrieved 10 February 2021.
  5. ^ a b c "England - Professional Football All-Time Tables". RSSSF.com. Retrieved 10 February 2021.
  6. ^ Bloomfield, Craig (12 September 2011). "Top 10 starts to a season: Man United, Man City, Liverpool, Arsenal, Leeds United, Spurs and Preston". talksport.com. Talksport. Retrieved 5 August 2016.
  7. ^ "Club Honours and Records". Reading F.C. 11 July 2012. Archived from the original on 14 February 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2012.
  8. ^ McNulty, Phil (24 February 2020). "Liverpool 3-2 West Ham: Mane scores winner as Reds forced to come from behind". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2 March 2021.
  9. ^ Stone, Simon (2 March 2021). "Manchester City 4-1 Wolverhampton Wanderers: Leaders extend winning run to 21 games". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2 March 2021.
  10. ^ "Which Premier League records can Liverpool break?". Premier League.com. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  11. ^ "City set new English football away wins record". Manchester City F.C. 14 May 2021. Retrieved 14 May 2021.
  12. ^ a b "Champions Liverpool beat Newcastle to finish on 99 points". BBC. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  13. ^ a b The Football League | Stats | Records | Records – League | Draws | DRAWS Archived 14 October 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  14. ^ Barclay, Patrick (16 May 2004). "Arsenal join the Invincibles". The Daily Telegraph. London. Archived from the original on 12 January 2022.
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 11 February 2014.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ Football League: Most Consecutive Losses Archived 19 September 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  17. ^ "My Football Facts & Stats - Football League - All-Time Top Flight Points Table 1888-89 to 2010-11". www.myfootballfacts.com.
  18. ^ "English Premier League : Full All Time Table". statto.com. Archived from the original on 10 January 2016. Retrieved 12 March 2015.
  19. ^ a b c d The Football League | Stats | Records | Records – League | Goals | GOALS Archived 20 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  20. ^ Aston Villa did not win the championship, finishing second to Arsenal whose goal tally of 127 that season is the second-highest ever in the top flight.
  21. ^ "FA Cup Final: Trophy Lift and Pitch Celebrations". mancity.com. 18 May 2019.
  22. ^ Behind the Numbers: Scoring scoring Arsenal | Club Records | History | Arsenal.com Archived 21 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  23. ^ a b c "Premier League review: Man City landmark and did Suarez dive?". London. 19 January 2014. Retrieved 26 January 2014.
  24. ^ "Football League Matches: Arsenal Only Draw, Record Scoring by Stockport". The Manchester Guardian. 8 January 1934. p. 3.
  25. ^ a b "English Premier League : Records". statto.com. Archived from the original on 7 November 2011. Retrieved 19 November 2011.
  26. ^ Sutcliffe, Steve (25 October 2019). "Southampton 0-9 Leicester City: Foxes equal record for biggest Premier League win". BBC Sport. Retrieved 25 October 2019.
  27. ^ Arsenal's A to Z... L is for Ljungberg | Arsenal.com Archived 15 October 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  28. ^ "More Gaffer football trivia answers". Orange. 10 November 2009. Archived from the original on 30 September 2011. Retrieved 28 March 2014.
  29. ^ a b "Away penalties at Old Trafford", Sean Ingle, Barry Glendenning and Matt Cunningham, The Guardian, 26 June 2003
  30. ^ a b "Football League Records: Disciplinary" Archived 7 December 2006 at the Wayback Machine, The Football League, accessed 4 December 2007
  31. ^ "Tallest Footballers ever", The Guardian, accessed 10 June 2010
  32. ^ "Lock, Stock and Three Smoking Seconds!", Bobby F.C., accessed 16 December 2017 Archived 14 December 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  33. ^ "Peter Shilton: Biography". Archived from the original on 17 May 2007. Retrieved 8 April 2007. Throughout his amazing 30-year career he played for 11 English league clubs through which he accumulated a record 1005 League appearances.
  34. ^ "Barnsley schoolboy makes history". BBC Sport. 1 October 2008. Retrieved 1 October 2008.
  35. ^ Hodgson, Guy; Searl, Liz (8 December 1995). "Football's fastest goal claimed". The Independent. London.
  36. ^ "Fastest football (soccer) goal in the Premier League by a substitute". Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  37. ^ a b c "QosFC: Legends - Dave Halliday". qosfc.com.
  38. ^ a b c d e f g "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 26 September 2016. Retrieved 4 October 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  39. ^ Barber, David (3 February 2010). "Fastest Cup hat-trick". The FA. Retrieved 4 February 2010.
  40. ^ "FA Cup Heroes". The Football Association. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 10 July 2013.
  41. ^ "FA Cup » All-time Topscorers". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 5 August 2016.
  42. ^ 20 November – Mac o' Nine Tales[permanent dead link], On This Football Day.
  43. ^ "Gills' Freeman makes Cup history". BBC Sport. 12 November 2007. Retrieved 15 January 2009.
  44. ^ "Teenager breaks FA Cup record on his debut". Loughborough Echo. 10 September 2011. Archived from the original on 2 April 2012. Retrieved 10 September 2011.
  45. ^ Bascombe, Chris; Tyers, Alan (10 January 2021). "Alfie Devine, Tottenham's youngest-ever player, among scorers as Marine's FA Cup adventure ends". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 12 January 2022.
  46. ^ "Bradford City penalty shoot-out record following history-making victory over Arsenal". London: Telegraph Media Group Limited. 12 December 2012. Archived from the original on 12 January 2022. Retrieved 29 May 2013.
  47. ^ Powell, Dave (14 December 2016). "Did Chester FC concede the quickest penalty ever last night?". chesterchronicle.
  48. ^ Ross, James (1 September 2016). "England – List of Champions". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  49. ^ Ross, James (26 May 2016). "England FA Challenge Cup Finals". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  50. ^ Ross, James (2 March 2017). "England – Football League Cup Finals". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 29 March 2016. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  51. ^ a b Ross, James (18 August 2016). "England – List of FA Charity/Community Shield Matches". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  52. ^ Stokkermans, Karel (8 September 2016). "European Champions' Cup Matches". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  53. ^ Stokkermans, Karel (8 September 2016). "UEFA Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  54. ^ Stokkermans, Karel (9 June 2019). "European Super Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  55. ^ Leme de Arruda, Marcelo; Di Maggio, Roberto (12 January 2017). "FIFA Club World Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  56. ^ "Football League Full Members' Cup Summary". www.fchd.info. Football Club History Database. Archived from the original on 5 July 2017. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  57. ^ "How Arsenal won the Centenary Trophy, the least celebrated title in their history". The Guardian. Retrieved 14 April 2018.
  58. ^ Stokkermans, Karel (26 January 2000). "European Cup Winners' Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  59. ^ Stokkermans, Karel (26 January 2000). "Fairs' Cup". www.rsssf.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  60. ^ "LMA's Longest Serving Managers – Historical". League Manager's Association. Archived from the original on 6 January 2012. Retrieved 9 December 2011.
  61. ^ Leroy Rosenior lost his job at Torquay just 10 minutes after being introduced as the Devon club's new manager. The then Chairman Mike Bateson called him to say he had just sold the club to a group led by Colin Lee, who reinstated himself as director of football only a matter of days after being made redundant by the club.
  62. ^ a b "UNITED under Sir Alex FERGUSON". StretfordEnd.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2 March 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2010.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]