Foreign Legion Command

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Commandement de La Légion Étrangère
(French)
Foreign Legion Command
(English)
Insigne du COMLE.jpg
Foreign Legion Command Insignia
Active Commandement de La Légion Étrangère[1]
(1931 - 1984)
Commandement de La Légion Étrangère[2]
C.O.M.L.E (1984 - present)[3]
Country  France
Allegiance Flag of legion.svgFrench Foreign Legion
Type Command
Role Headquarters
Headquarters Aubagne, France
Motto(s) Honneur et Fidélité
Legio Patria Nostra
Colors Green and Red
Battle honours Camerone 1863
Commanders
Commandant de La Légion Étrangère (France)
Commandant of the French Foreign Legion (English)
Général C.O.M.L.E[4]
Notable
commanders
Paul-Frédéric Rollet[5]
Insignia
Beret badge of the Foreign Legion Command Insige de béret COMLE Type 2.jpg
Abbreviation C.O.M.L.E

The L'Etat-major du Commandement de la Légion Étrangère[6] (French: L'Etat-major du (C.O.M.)mandement de la (L.)égion (É.)trangère, C.O.M.L.E) or Foreign Legion Command refers to the general staff headquarters (French: L'Etat-major) of the Commandment of the French Foreign Legion (French: Commandement de la Légion Étrangère), the latter patronized by the Commandant of the Legion (French: Commandant de La Légion Étrangère).[7][8][9][10] The Commandement de la Légion Étrangère has adopted various inspecting, grouping, and commanding designations since 1931 and has been designated as C.O.M.L.E since 1984.[11] The Général de division commanding the Legion, also known as Father of the Legion (French: Le Père Légion) is a direct subordinate of the Chief of Staff of the French Army (C.E.M.A.T). The Division Général is the technical counselar commanding for the ensemble related to the Legion ( recruitment, traditions, employment, regimental formations and security).

The Général de division of the Legion commands exclusively the 1st Foreign Regiment (1er R.E.) (French: 1er Régiment étranger), the 4th Foreign Regiment (4e R.E.) (French: 4e Régiment étranger) and the Foreign Legion Recruiting Group (G.R.L.E) (French: Groupement du recrutement de la Légion étrangère).

C.O.M.L.E has direct command over the 1st Foreign Regiment (1er RE), 4th Foreign Regiment (4e RE) and the Foreign Legion Recruiting Group (GRLE) (while the GRLE was not formed till 2007, the 1er RE and the 4e RE are regiments of traditions which are outside the regular French Army command).[10] The commands of the C.O.M.L.E division general commandant extends to:

The Principal[14]Ambassadorship and reputation of the Foreign Legion and the French Armed Forces as a whole, on the international scene, is properly upheld, preserved and performed soundly by the French Foreign Legion Music Band (French: Musique de la Légion étrangère, MLE) led by the Music Chief (French: Chef de La Musique).[15]

History[edit]

Légion Étrangère : VII Centuries at the service of France[edit]

The French Foreign Legion (French: Légion Étrangère) of 1831, dates from King Louis Philippe. However, during the monarchy, foreign contingents were incorporated in the French Army (French: Armée Française) for a same time period of service and grand military contribution. King Philip-August would be the first of French Kings to regularly service foreigners in his grand military expeditions. This King was the first to mold an unheard of discipline, even then unknown to the feudal armies. The Grand Companies (French: Grandes Compagnies) were composed of French; however included also foreigners as well: Flemish, Dutch, Castillians, Welsh, Bretons, Gascons and Savoyards. Their Chiefs were issued from nobility and amongst them featured Sires.

During the reign of this King, a permanent army in France was organized. Scots came forth to serve the King of France, and the latter would constitute them into companies. In 1439, at the appearance of the Ordinance Companies (French: Compagnies d’ordonnance) created by King Charles VII, which numbered fifteen, two were Scottish. Since then, the history of the Scottish company of the King's Own Guard (French: Compagnie Ecossaise des Gardes du Corps du Roi) would often be merged with that of the former French monarchy. In the 18th century century, this corps, a role model of fidelity, had no Scots remaining but their name designation as a unit left.

In the pages conserved at the Origins of the French Foreign Legion (French: La Légion Etrangère), the Swiss deserve their own place due to their seniority, their importance and the duration of their service. The Swiss in service of France, conserved their particular character. Experienced infantry, the Swiss shared all the garrisons, marches, campaigns, victories or reverses. In the fatal campaigns of Rossbach in 1757, while their red uniform covered the unfolding under fire, the Swiss in admiration were described as a red brick wall which cannons couldn't pierce.

In 1791, the French Army consisted of almost 14,000 Swiss, uniquely infantry units out of which 11 Line regiments, the Regiment of the Swiss Guards (French: Régiment des Gardes Suisses), the Company of the Hundred Swiss and the Company of the Ordinary Guard of the Count. They were the example of bravery in 1567 and on August 10 1792, giving the most sublime act of devotion. The Swiss regimental colors are those that harbored the first motto of « Fidelitate et Honore ». Translated in to French, these golden words are featured on the current regimental colors of the Legion, and it is also under that formula that the legionnaire signs his act of engagement.

During the religious wars, Spaniards served in the ranks of the cavalry corps, with the proportion of the foreign corps becoming stronger than the French squadrons. Some also hailed from Germany, with Richelieu reinforcing the army more with a corps of foreigners. Sixteen German cavalry regiments were integrated into the ranks and which featured in the order of battle of the French Army in 1639. They were Weimars, Lorraine, Scots, Swiss, Poles, soldiers hailing from the Netherlands as well as Germany. During this époque, the King's troops, which formed the infantry and cavalry corps, were composed in half of foreigners. Foreign formation had to wait for Louvois, to see numbers diminish notably in proportions. At the end of the century of the Grand King, numbers reached a sixth of the composition. Within these proportions, Spain and Italy supplied troops while England also dispatched troops to the King of France.

At the eve the revolution, out of the 150,000 men composing the Royal Army, 40,000 were foreign and consisted of Swiss, German, Irish or Liégeois regiments for the infantry, and German, Swedish or Hungarian for the cavalry. Various German and Swiss regiments were recruited in Alsace and Lorraine, and numerous French personnel figured in the Irish or Liégeois regiments.

The Foreign Regiments of the Kings of France disappeared, and the words French Foreign Legion (French: « Légion étrangère ») were pronounced in 1792 within a decree deciding the organization of a Légion Franche Etrangère (French: « La Légion Franche Etrangère ») in which would only admit foreigners. Swiss and Polish armed this legion. Foreign contingents filled the ranks of the Grand Army, while counting a considerable mass of foreigners, unseen for a first time in history. The entire of Europe would be represented. After the campaigns of 1812 and 1813, the only remaining troops were the Italians, Swiss and Poles. These were the champions of the first and last hour of the Napoleonic era with squadrons of light cavalry.

Originality often housed the Foreign Army with enlistments of foreign formations hailing from various geographical corners. The Hungarian Hussars came at the end of the reign of Louis XIV. Also joining in picturesque were the Mamluks of Egypt, who joined the service a hundred years later as Guards of the Council then the Imperial Guards of the Emperor. These Orientals were an astonishing and shocking vision given to the Parisians and to Europe, while they mounted their colorful cavalry in a parading allure.

During the entire Empire, the German allies always exalted the sentiments of the Napoleonic era. For them, the star of the Légion d'honneur would become almost the most envied and the most supreme compensation. The grand souvenirs of campaigns accomplished under the French Imperial Eagle remained engraved in the memories of those foreigners along with Austerlitz, Iéna, Friedland, Wagram, Lutzen, Montmirail, as well as Waterloo. They were materialized by the portrait of the Emperor on display in several German Occidental Houses, sometimes near the Saint Helena Medal. Laid across and remaining vibrant well beyond the Rhin, the Napoleon legend recalled numerous accomplishments at the corps of the Grande Armée, with the particular grand role contribution of German contingents.

Under the first restoration, the Bourbons would only conserve the Swiss, in souvenir to their loyal service rendered to France during four centuries, and with them also, four foreign regiments out of which one colonial, formed of Spaniards and Portuguese. The eight foreign regiments organized by Napoleon at the hundred days formed in 1815 the Royal Foreign Legion (French: « La Légion Royale Etrangère »), which became the Hohenlohe Legion (French: « La Légion de Hohenlohe »), then in 1821 the Hohenlohe Regiment (French: Le Régiment de Hohenlohe). Licensed in 1830, the latter contributed to form the Twenty First Light, then the French Foreign Legion (French: Légion Étrangère). The Swiss regiments of the restoration disappeared in 1830; nevertheless, the Swiss reincorporated again the French Army from 1855 to 1859 through the successive denominations of the 2nd Foreign Legion (French: « La Deuxième Légion Etrangère », 2e LE) and the 1st Foreign Regiment (French: 1er Régiment Etranger, 1er RE).

Royal Foreign Legion in 1815[edit]

While the regiments of the Foreign Legion weren't established until 1831 as regiments composing a Foreign Legion; Royal Foreign Regiments of the Grand Army (French: La Grande Armée) prior 1831 constituted the Royal Foreign Legion (French: La Légion Royale Étrangère) created on September 6, 1815 and which was renamed the Hohenlohe Regiment (French: Le Régiment de Hohenlohe) in 1821; hence, the elite reputation of the 1831 Foreign Legion.

Foreign Legion Regiments of Tradition ( 1831 - present )[edit]

Each year, the French Foreign Legion commemorates and celebrates Camarón in its headquarters in Aubagne and Bastille Day military parade in Paris; featuring the Pionniers leading and opening the way while marching to the sound of the Music.[16]

At least 400 Foreign Regiments, Royal Foreign Units and Imperial Guards served the Kings of France and France till the beginning of the 19th century. In 1831, King Louis Philippe I[17], the King of the French signed to birth the nine articled Royal Ordinance with Minister of War, 1st Duke de Dalmatie, de Dieu Soult. The King's Royal Ordinance terms of the first article stated that a Legion composed of foreigners will be formed and this Legion will be known as the French Foreign Legion (French: La Légion Etrangère). Contrary to the foreign regiments that have previously served the Kingdom; the fourth article of the Royal Ordinance stipulated that service in this Legion will be exclusively voluntarily.

The French Foreign Legion was initially formed of troops having served in the regiment of Hohenlohe, officers of the Grande Armée (French: La Grande Armée) and reserve soldiers of the Imperial Wars. Consequently, the French Foreign Legion (French: La Légion Etrangère) was initially formed of 5 battalions compromised each of 8 combat companies. In application with the second article of the Royal Ordinance, each combat company was formed of men from the same nationality, speaking the same language. Consequently, towards the end of 1832, the French Foreign Legion was formed of 7 battalions.

The 1st Battalion consisted of men who served under the Restoration in the various Swiss Regiments (French: Les Régiments Swisses) and the Hohenlohe Regiment. The 2nd Battalion and 3rd Battalion were formed of Swiss and Germans, the 4th Battalion of Spaniards, the 5th of Sardinians and Italians, the 6th of Belgians and Dutch, and the 7th Battalion formed of Poles. In addition and obviously, Frenchmen, also composed the integration of these battalions.

Since then, the Legion has seen few Foreign Legion Officers at Foreign Titles (French: Officiers servant à titre étranger) commanding Legion regiments and detachments and mainly in times of Legion warfare around the History of France.[18]

Officers in the Legion for the most part are seconded from the French Army. French Officers (French: Officiers Français) of the Legion are amongst the elite and referred to as Legion Officers (French: Officiers de Légion), along with the highly admired, Legion Majors[19] (French: Major de Légion), Legion Chief Warrant Officers (French: Adjudant-chef de Légion), Legion Warrant Officers (French: Adjudant de Légion), and very rare few French (including Legion generals) and Foreign (non-French) Legion Officers (French: Officiers du Rang de La Légion) seconded from the ranks of the Legionnaires.[20]

The history tradition making of Legion regiments was front line opened and led by the Pionniers and charged by the service and sacrifices of the legionnaires following behind their legion regimental, battalion and company commanders since 1831 and serving the commanding Division Général of the Legion since 1931.[21]

Pionniers & Legion Regiments[edit]

Regiment Regiment Insignia Legion Regimental Command
1st Foreign Regiment, (1er R.E)[22]
Foreign Legion Tenure (1841 - present)
Insigne 1er régiment étranger-transparent.png
Pionniers.png
Foreign Legion Regiment - 1er RE Colonel[23][24]
Legion Pionniers Sections of Tradition
C.O.M.L.E Exclusive Command[25]
4th Foreign Regiment, (4e R.E)[26]
Foreign Legion Tenure (1920 - present)
Insigne régimentaire du 4e régiment étranger (1937).jpg Foreign Legion Regiment - 4e RE Colonel[27]
Legion Pionniers Groups
C.O.M.L.E Exclusive Command[25]
Foreign Legion Recruiting Group, (G.R.L.E)[28]
Foreign Legion Tenure (2007 - present)
Insigne-GRLE.jpg Foreign Legion Regiment - GRLE Colonel[29]
C.O.M.L.E Command[25]
1st Foreign Cavalry Regiment, (1er R.E.C)[30]
Foreign Legion Tenure (1920 - present)
Insigne 1er régiment étranger de cavalerie.jpg Foreign Legion Regiment - 1er REC Colonel [31]
Regiment part of the French 6th Light Armoured Brigade
1st Foreign Engineer Regiment (1er R.E.G)[32]
Foreign Legion Teunure (1999 - present)
former
6th Foreign Engineer Regiment (6e R.E.G)
Foreign Legion Tenure (1984-1999)
6° REG Type 1.jpg
1reg.JPG
Foreign Legion Regiment - 1er REG Colonel[33]
Legion Pionniers Groups
Airborne Combat Engineers
Regiment part of the French 6th Light Armoured Brigade
2nd Foreign Infantry Regiment, (2e R.E.I)[34]
Foreign Legion Tenure (1841 - present)
2rei.jpg
Foreign Legion Regiment - 2e REI Colonel[35]
Regiment part of the French 6th Light Armoured Brigade
2nd Foreign Parachute Regiment, (2e R.E.P)[36]
Foreign Legion Tenure (1948 - present)
2rep.jpg Foreign Legion Regiment - 2e REP Colonel[37][38]
Commando Parachute Group
Regiment part of the French 11th Parachute Brigade
2nd Foreign Engineer Regiment, (2e R.E.G)[39]
Foreign Legion Tenure (1999 - present)
Insigne 2e régiment étranger de génie.jpg Foreign Legion Regiment - 2e REG Colonel[40]
Legion Pionniers Groups
Airborne Combat Engineers
Regiment part of the French 27th Mountain Infantry Brigade
3rd Foreign Infantry Regiment, (3e R.E.I)[41]
Foreign Legion Tenure (1945 - present)
former
Marching Regiment of the Foreign Legion, (R.M.L.E)
Foreign Legion Tenure (1915-1920) - (1942-1945)
RMLE.jpg
3rei.jpg
Foreign Legion Regiment - 3e REI Colonel[42]
Legion Pionniers Groups
Regiment part of territorial command of French Army
13th Demi-Brigade of the Foreign Legion, (13e D.B.L.E)[43]
Foreign Legion Tenure (1940 - present)
Insigne régimentaire de la 13e Demi-brigade de Légion étrangère.jpg Foreign Legion Regiment - 13e DBLE Colonel [44]
Regiment part of the French 6th Light Armoured Brigade
Foreign Legion Detachment in Mayotte, (D.L.M.E)[45]
Foreign Legion Teunure (1973 - present)
Dlem.jpg Foreign Legion Detachment - DLME Colonel[46]
Legion Pionniers Groups
Detachment part of the territorial command of the French Army

Creation and different nominations ( 1931 - 1984 )[edit]

The command of the French Foreign Legion is stationed at quartier Vienot in Aubagne at the corps of the 1st Foreign Regiment 1er RE. The headquarters detachment was established in 1984 following the reorganization of the previous Foreign Legion Group (G.L.E). Foreign Legion Command is headed by a Général.

  • On March 2, 1931; the Inspection of the Foreign Legion (I.L.E) (French: Inspection de la Légion étrangère, I.L.E) was created.[47]
  • Between 1934 and 1935, the I.L.E was dissolved.[48]
  • In 1948, the I.L.E is recreated.[49]
  • On September 1, 1950; the I.L.E was dissolved and the Autonomous Group of the Foreign Legion (G.A.L.E) (French: Groupement Autonome de la Légion étrangère, G.A.L.E) is created.[50]
  • On July 1, 1955; the Foreign Legion Command (C.O.L.E) (French: Commandement de la Légion étrangère) was created.[51]
  • On September 16, 1957; the C.O.L.E became the Technical Inspection of the Foreign Legion (I.T.L.E) (French: Inspection Technique de la Légion étrangère).
  • On July 1, 1964; the I.T.L.E was dissolved.[52]
  • On September 1, 1972, creation of the Foreign Legion Groupment (G.L.E) (French: Groupement de Légion étrangère) which included the Operational Group of the Foreign Legion (G.O.L.E.) (French: Groupement Opérationnel de la Légion étrangère).
  • On July 1, 1984, the G.L.E became the Foreign Legion Command (C.O.M.L.E) (French: Commandement de la Légion étrangère).[53]

History of the garrisons, campaigns and battles[edit]

During the interwar period on April 1, 1931, while the Legion reached requirements of 30,000 Legionnaires, général Paul-Frédéric Rollet,[54] was entrusted with the post of Inspector of the Foreign Legion newly created in Tlemcen in Algeria. It is at this moment that the Communal Depot of the Foreign Regiments (D.C.R.E) (French: Dépôt commun des régiments étrangers, D.C.R.E) was created. This Inspector of the Foreign Legion was dissolved with the retirement of the Father of the Legion.

In 1948, the Inspection was recreated for 2 years under the command of Général de division Raoul Magrin-Vernerey.[55] Again dissolved in 1950, the inspection unit left way for the Autonomous Group of the Foreign Legion (G.A.L.E) commanded consecutively by Générals Jean Olié and Paul Gardy which have the attributions of Inspector General.[56] Accordingly, the (G.A.L.E) was composed of one headquarter staff état-major at Sidi bel-Abbès, the Communal Depot of the Legion, the 1st Foreign Infantry Regiment 1er REI that regrouped all training/ instruction units, the intelligence service, and the Moral Service for Works of the Foreign Legion (S.O.M.L.E) (French: Service du Moral et des œuvres de la Légion étrangère , S.O.M.L.E)

In 1954, at the end of the First Indochina War, the Foreign Legion was reorganized. The 1st Foreign Regiment 1er RE inherited all the attributions of Legion units. The Foreign Legion Command (C.O.L.E) was created on July 1, 1955 at Vincennes; with command ensured by Colonel René Lennuyeux.[57] Two years later on September 16, 1957, the foreign legion command inherited the new naming of Technical Inspection of the Foreign Legion (I.T.L.E). This technical inspection was dissolved in 1964 and its attributions were transferred to the regimental commander of the 1st Foreign Regiment 1er RE.

In 1972, under the impulsion of Colonel Marcel Letestu,[58] a Foreign Legion Groupment (G.L.E) was created which is put at his disposition. Accordingly, Colonel Letestu has immediate authority on the 1st Foreign Regiment 1er RE and the 2nd Foreign Regiment 2e RE and conserved this prerogative of General Inspector. On the other hand, the commander of the (G.L.E) commanded also the 31st Brigade. This experimental unit, Legion dominated was among the first inter-arm brigade. The 31st Brigade (French: 31e Brigade) engaged in peacekeeping combat operations in Lebanon at the corps of the Multinational Force in Lebanon under the command of Foreign Legion Groupment (G.L.E) Général de brigade Jean-Claude Coullon.[59] The 31e Brigade was subsequently replaced by the 6th Light Armoured Division 6ème D.L.B in 1984 and then became designated as the 6th Light Armoured Brigade 6ème B.L.B following the Gulf War at the corps of Division Daguet.

On July 1, 1984; the (G.L.E) inherited the denomination of Foreign Legion Command (C.O.M.L.E) (French: Commandement de la Légion étrangère).[60]

Organization[edit]

In the mission, the division general commanding the French Foreign Legion is assisted by a general staff headquarters which service operations are based on the personnel of the 1st Foreign Regiment 1er R.E and the Foreign Legion Recruiting Group (G.R.L.E). This general staff compromised as of the 2012 of the following Divisions and bureaux:

  • Foreign Legion Human Resources Division (French: Division des Ressources Humaines, D.R.H.L.E): Division ensured the management of the ensemble administration of personnel serving at Foreign Status.
  • Foreign Legion Recruiting Group, (French: Groupement de Recrutement de la Légion étrangère, G.R.L.E): responsible entity for Legion centers of information, Legion recruiting centers, as well as the Legion center of selection and incorporation.
  • Foreign Legion Information Systems and Communication Division, (French: Division des Systèmes d'Information et de Communication, D.S.I.C.L.E): Division developed proper applications, administered networks and consulting in material of formation (Information Systems) for the Foreign Legion. The division also supported the Foreign Legion Service Handling of Information (French: Service de traitement de l'information de la Légion Étrangère, S.T.I.L.E).
  • Foreign Legion Statistical and Personnel Protection Division (French: Division Statistiques et Protection du Personnel de la Légion étrangère, D.S.P.L.E): Division handled in material of protection and security, the ensemble of personnel serving at Foreign Status. This division paraticipated at the selection process of candidates at engagement.
  • Foreign Legion Communication and Information Division, (French: Division Communication et Information, D.I.C.L.E): Division in charge of institutional communication. This division ran public relations, the media, issue numbers production of Képi Blanc (French: Képi Blanc), the monthly of the legion, the administration of information technologoies, as well audio cells.
  • Foreign Legion History and Patrimony Division, (French: Division Histoire et Patrimoine, D.H.P.L.E): Division handled the conservation preservation and management of the foreign legion, and most notably the management of Foreign Legion Museum (French: Musée de la Légion étrangère).
  • Foreign Legion Social Work and Aid Bureau, (French: Bureau d'Action Sociale et d'Entraide de la Légion étrangère, BASELE/FELE).

As of 2017, the general staff headquarters of the Commandment of the French Foreign Legion (French: L'Etat-major du Commandement de la Légion Étrangère), at the disposition of the Commandant of the Legion,[61] has undergone further organizational structuring and was articulated in various Grand Divisions revolving around: studies, pilotage and synthesis; human resources; security and protection; patrimony; solidarity and others.[62]

Traditions[edit]

Insignia[edit]

Regimental Colors[edit]

Foreign Legion Command (C.O.M.L.E) (French: Commandement de la Légion Étrangère) redesignated since 1984 is an integral part of the 1st Foreign Regiment 1er RE.

Decorations[edit]

Marching Song[edit]

Légion Étrangère Anniversaries ( 1831 - present )[edit]

Monument morts legion.JPG

100th Anniversary - 1931[edit]

1931, marked the 100th Anniversary of the Légion Étrangère, prepared by Général de brigade Paul-Frédéric Rollet.

150th Anniversary - 1981[edit]

1981, marked the 150th Anniversary of the Légion Étrangère.

185th Anniversary - 2016[edit]

2016, marked the 185th Anniversary of the Légion Étrangère.

Commandement de La Légion Étrangère Anniversaries ( 1931 - present )[edit]

Paul-Frédéric Rollet - 1931[edit]

1931, marked the 1st Inspector of the Foreign Legion (French: Inspection de la Légion étrangère) (I.L.E) creating the Commandment under his intentions.[64]

25th Anniversary - 1956[edit]

1956 marked the 25th Anniversary of the Commandment under the leadership of Général de brigade René Lennuyeux, while the Foreign Legion Command (French: Commandement de la Légion Étrangère) (C.O.L.E) adopted the designation of Technical Inspection of the Foreign Legion (French: Inspection Technique de la Légion étrangère) (I.T.L.E).

50th Anniversary - 1981[edit]

1981, marked the 50th Anniversary of the Commandment under the leadership of Général de brigade Paul Lardry, under the denomination of the Foreign Legion Groupment (French: Groupement de la Légion Étrangère) (G.L.E).

75th Anniversary - 2006[edit]

2006, marked the 75th Anniversary of the Commandment under the leadership of Général de division Bruno Dary, under the denomination of Foreign Legion Command (French: Commandement de la Légion Étrangère) (C.O.M.L.E).

85th Anniversary - 2016[edit]

2016, marked the 85th Anniversary of the Commandment under the leadership of Général de division Jean Maurin, under the denomination of Foreign Legion Command (French: Commandement de la Légion Étrangère) (C.O.M.L.E).

Commandement de La Légion Étrangère[edit]

Commandement de La Légion Étrangère ( 1931 - 1984 )[65][edit]

Inspector Tenure of Foreign Legion[edit]

Inspection de la Légion étrangère (I.L.E)
Name Portrait Rank Tenure Note
Paul-Frédéric Rollet[66] Paul-Frédéric Rollet.jpg Général 1931-1935 1st Foreign Regiment (1899-1909).
Captain of the 3rd mounted combat company of the 1st marching battalion of the 2nd Foreign Regiment from 1909 to 1914.
Lieutenant-Colonel Regimental Commander of the Marching Regiment of the Foreign Legion in 1917.
Lieutenant-Colonel Regimental Commander of the 3rd Foreign Regiment (1920-1925).
Colonel Regimental Commander of the 1st Foreign Regiment (1925-1931) until planning the 100th year anniversary of the Legion on Camaron day of April 30, 1931.
Founding Pillar Patron of the orgnanization of the French Foreign Legion and constituents.
Accumulated 41 years of military service out of which 33 years in the Legion.
Honorary titled Father of the Legion or Le Père de la Légion.[25]
Raoul Magrin-Vernerey[67] Général 1948-1950

Autonomous Group Tenure of the Foreign Legion[edit]

Groupement autonome de la Légion étrangère (G.A.L.E)
Name Portrait Rank Tenure Note
Jean Olié[68] Jean Olié (1961).jpg Général 1950
Paul Gardy[69] - Général 1951

Foreign Legion Command Tenure[edit]

Commandement de la Légion étrangère (C.O.L.E)
Name Portrait Rank Tenure Note
René Lennuyeux[70] - Général 1955

Technical Inspection Tenure of the Foreign Legion[edit]

Inspection technique de la Légion étrangère (I.T.L.E)
Name Portrait Rank Tenure Note
René Lennuyeux[71] - Général 1957
Paul Gardy[72] - Général 1958
René Morel[73] - Général 1960
Jacques Lefort[74] - Général 1962

Foreign Legion Groupment Tenure[edit]

Groupement de la Légion étrangère (G.L.E)
Name Portrait Rank Tenure Note
Marcel Letestu[75] - Général 1972 Sergent to Général
Gustave Fourreau[76] - Général 1973 Caporal-Chef to Général
Bernard Goupil[77] - Général 1976 Caporal-Chef to Général
Paul Lardry[78] - Général 1980
Jean-Claude Coullon[79] - Général 1982 Caporal-Chef to Général

Commandement de la Légion Étrangère - C.O.M.L.E - ( 1984 - present )[80][edit]

général Bruno Dary, Military governor of Paris (2007-2012), in revue passage.

The Foreign Legion Groupment (G.L.E)[81] transitted giving formation to the Foreign Legion Command (C.O.M.L.E)[82] through the command of Général de brigade Jean-Claude Coullon in 1984.[83]

# Name Portrait Rank Tenure Note
1 Jean-Claude Coullon[84] - Général 1984
2 Jean Louis Roué[85] - Général 1985 Caporal-Chef to Général
3 Raymond Le Corre[86] - Général 1988
4 Bernard Colcomb[87] - Général 1992
5 Christian Piquemal[88] - Général 1994
6 Bernard Grail[89] - Général 1999
7 Jean-Louis Franceschi[90] - Général 2002
8 Bruno Dary[91] - Général 2004
9 Louis Pichot de Champfleury[92] - Général 2006
10 Alain Bouquin[93] - Général 2009
11 Christophe de Saint-Chamas[94] Gal-de-saint-chamas-2011.jpg Général 2011
12 Jean Maurin[95] - Général 2014

See also[edit]

References & Notes[edit]

  1. ^ [1] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  2. ^ [2] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  3. ^ [3] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  4. ^ [4] Le C.O.M.L.E, Le Commandement de la Légion Étrangère (The Commandment of the French Foreign Legion)
  5. ^ [5] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  6. ^ [6] L'Etat-major du Commandement de la Légion Étrangère (general staff headquarters of the Commandment of the French Foreign Legion)
  7. ^ [7] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  8. ^ [8] Le C.O.M.L.E, Le Commandement de la Légion Étrangère (C.O.M.L.E, The Commandment of the French Foreign Legion)
  9. ^ [9] L'Etat-major du Commandement de la Légion Étrangère (general staff headquarters of the Commandment of the French Foreign Legion)
  10. ^ a b Koelher, Charles (31 March 2006). "LEGIO PATRIA NOSTRA: THE HISTORY OF THE FRENCH FOREIGN LEGION SINCE 1962" (PDF). U.S. General Command and Staff College. p. 69. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 
  11. ^ [10] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  12. ^ [11] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  13. ^ [12] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  14. ^ Foreign Legion Music (French: Musique de la Légion étrangère, MLE), formerly officially known as the Principal Music of the Foreign Legion (French: Musique principale de la Légion étrangère)
  15. ^ [13] History of the French Foreign Legion Music Band
  16. ^ The Music Band of the Legion has numerous distinct roles (marching or stand still) and depending on the traditional arms ceremony at hand. Traditions in general are not usually subject to references, specially in Military units which perpetuate them repetitively through all arms ceremonies, all the time. In the Legion, traditions are the marching corps of the Legion itself. On Camarón, the Pionniers set the Marching tone for tradition, while typically French Schools detachment such as Saint-Cyr (French Army), École Navale (Marine Nationale) and the École de l'air(French Air Force), stand At attention (French: Garde-à-vous) in the rear, next to the Music of the Legion.
  17. ^ The Duke of Orléans was a former Lieutenant-General.
  18. ^ [14] Les mots du général COM.LE (words of the general commanding the Legion, COMLE) The Commandant's Editorial, Foreign Legion Officers serving at Foreign Titles represent 10% of the Officers Corps of the Foreign Legion. Seconded from the ranks, they are the heirs to the Foreign Officers that have served France - Russian, Danish, Indochinese or Swiss - which they set and follow their example
  19. ^ The rank of French Major was a senior superior officer rank first with a history of various military traditions in various corps, then recently became a senior rank attached to the sub-officer corps as of 2009. Prior to such integration, the rank of French Major was a senior superior corps between the Officer Corps and Non-Commissioned Corps, with history dating back well beyond the 18th century at the level of various designations across the armed forces of France.
  20. ^ [15] Les mots du général COM.LE (words of the general commanding the Legion, COMLE) The Commandant's Editorial, Foreign Legion Officers serving at Foreign Titles represent 10% of the Officers Corps of the Foreign Legion. Seconded from the ranks, they are the heirs to the Foreign Officers that have served France - Russian, Danish, Indochinese or Swiss - which they set and follow their example
  21. ^ [16] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  22. ^ [17] Official Website of the 1st Foreign Regiment
  23. ^ [18] Official Website of the 1st Foreign Regiment (1er RE), Regimental Commanders from (1841 to 1955)
  24. ^ [19] Official Website of the 1st Foreign Regiment (1er RE), Regimental Commanders from (1955 - present)
  25. ^ a b c d [20] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  26. ^ [21] Official Website of the 4th Foreign Regiment
  27. ^ [22] Official Website of the 4th Foreign Regiment (4e RE), Regimental Commanders from (1920 - present)
  28. ^ [23] Official Website of the Foreign Legion Recruiting Group
  29. ^ [24] Official Website of the Foreign Legion Recruiting Group (GRLE), Regimental Commanders from (2007 - present)
  30. ^ [25] Official Website of the 1st Foreign Cavalry Regiment
  31. ^ [26] Official Website of the 1st Foreign Cavalry Regiment (1er REC), Regimental Commanders from (1921 - present)
  32. ^ [27] Official Website of the 1st Foreign Engineer Regiment
  33. ^ [28] Official Website of the 1st Foreign Engineer Regiment (1er REG), Regimental Commanders (1984 - present)
  34. ^ [29] Official Website of the 2nd Foreign Infantry Regiment
  35. ^ [30] Official Website of the 2nd Foreign Infantry Regiment (2e REI), Regimental Commanders (1841 - present)
  36. ^ [31] Official Website of the 2nd Foreign Parachute Regiment
  37. ^ [32] Official Website of the 2nd Foreign Parachute Regiment (2e REP), Regimental Commanders (1955 - present)
  38. ^ [33] Official Website of the 2nd Foreign Parachute Regiment, History of Regimental and Commanders of the CEPs, BEPs and REPs (1948-Present)
  39. ^ [34] Official Website of the 2nd Foreign Engineer Regiment
  40. ^ [35] Official Website of the 2nd Foreign Engineer Regiment (2e REG), Regimental Commanders (1999 - present)
  41. ^ [36] Official Website of the 3rd Foreign Infantry Regiment
  42. ^ [37] Official Website of the 3rd Foreign Infantry Regiment, Regimental Commanders (1915 - present)
  43. ^ [38] Official Website of the 13th Demi-Brigade of the Foreign Legion
  44. ^ [39] Official Website of the 13th Dem-Brigade of the Foreign Legion (13e DBLE), Regimental Commander (1940- Present)
  45. ^ [40] Official Website of the Foreign Legion Detachment in Mayotte
  46. ^ [41] Official Website of the Foreign Legion Deatchment in Mayotte (DLME) and 2nd Company of the 3rd Foreign Infantry Regiment (2e Co. 3e REI), Regimental Commander
  47. ^ [42] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  48. ^ [43] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  49. ^ [44] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  50. ^ [45] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  51. ^ [46] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  52. ^ [47] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  53. ^ [48] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  54. ^ [49] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  55. ^ [50] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  56. ^ [51] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  57. ^ [52] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  58. ^ [53] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  59. ^ [54] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  60. ^ [55] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  61. ^ [56] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  62. ^ [57] L'Etat-major du Commandement de la Légion Étrangère (general staff headquarters of the Commandment of the French Foreign Legion)
  63. ^ [58] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  64. ^ [59] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  65. ^ [60] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  66. ^ [61] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  67. ^ [62] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  68. ^ [63] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  69. ^ [64] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  70. ^ [65] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  71. ^ [66] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  72. ^ [67] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  73. ^ [68] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  74. ^ [69] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  75. ^ [70] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  76. ^ [71] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  77. ^ [72] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  78. ^ [73] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  79. ^ [74] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  80. ^ [75] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  81. ^ [76] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  82. ^ [77] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  83. ^ [78] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  84. ^ [79] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  85. ^ [80] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  86. ^ [81] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  87. ^ [82] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  88. ^ [83] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  89. ^ [84] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  90. ^ [85] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  91. ^ [86] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  92. ^ [87] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  93. ^ [88] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  94. ^ [89] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE
  95. ^ [90] Division General Commandant of the French Foreign Legion, Les Chefs COMLE