Forest bathing

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Walking through a bamboo forest in Arashiyama, Kyoto

In Japan, a forest bathing trip, called shinrin-yoku (森林浴) in Japanese, or sēnlínyù (森林浴) in Mandarin and sanlimyok (산림욕) in Korean, is a short, leisurely visit to a forest.

Shinrin Yoku Samurai Spain 侍

History[edit]

A forest bathing trip involves visiting a forest for relaxation and recreation while breathing in volatile substances, called phytoncides (wood essential oils), which are antimicrobial volatile organic compounds derived from trees, such as a-pinene and limonene. Incorporating forest bathing trips into a good lifestyle was first proposed in 1982 by the Forest Agency of Japan. It has now become a recognized relaxation and/or stress management activity in Japan.

In 2007, the Master Samurai Spain 侍[1] pioneer in Europe moved to the Forest, where he began his research studies fascinated by nature and beneficial to the practice of Shinrin yoku for 24 hours in the countryside and the positive impact it brings to our organization translating health and quality of life, helps solidify his experience and developed hundreds of field studies and research with practice Shinrin Yoku 森林 浴 also providing a mutual experiment called "Feeding on the life of the Forest". Discovered when combining these two preventive therapies related to the magnitude of Shinrin-yoku 森林 浴 effect. A set of healthy habits and balance along with the practice of Shinrin-yoku 森林 浴 greatly improves the physical and mental health. The fieldwork and scientific studies that are being applied has developed in children and its relation with Shinrin-yoku.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Shinrin-Yoku: Forest Medicine | Samurai Spain 侍". Samuraispain.org. Retrieved 2016-02-25. 
  2. ^ "De niños Tecnológicos a Niños Naturales "Shinrin-Yoku"". Sunotadeprensa.com. 2012-06-08. Retrieved 2016-02-25. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Li, Qing; Nakadai, Ari; Matsushima, Hiroki; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Krensky, Alan M.; Kawada, Tomoyuki; Morimoto, Kanehisa (2006). "Phytoncides (Wood Essential Oils) Induce Human Natural Killer Cell Activity". Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology 28 (2): 319–33. doi:10.1080/08923970600809439. PMID 16873099. 
  • Li, Q; Morimoto, K; Nakadai, A; Inagaki, H; Katsumata, M; Shimizu, T; Hirata, Y; Hirata, K; Suzuki, H (2007). "Forest bathing enhances human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins". International journal of immunopathology and pharmacology 20 (2 Suppl 2): 3–8. PMID 17903349. 
  • Li, Q; Morimoto, K; Kobayashi, M; Inagaki, H; Katsumata, M; Hirata, Y; Hirata, K; Suzuki, H; Li, YJ (2008). "Visiting a forest, but not a city, increases human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins". International journal of immunopathology and pharmacology 21 (1): 117–27. PMID 18336737. 
  • Li, Q; Morimoto, K; Kobayashi, M; Inagaki, H; Katsumata, M; Hirata, Y; Hirata, K; Shimizu, T; Li, YJ (2008). "A forest bathing trip increases human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins in female subjects". Journal of biological regulators and homeostatic agents 22 (1): 45–55. PMID 18394317. 
  • Li, Qing (2009). "Effect of forest bathing trips on human immune function". Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine 15 (1): 9–17. doi:10.1007/s12199-008-0068-3. PMC 2793341. PMID 19568839. 
  • Li, Q; Kobayashi, M; Wakayama, Y; Inagaki, H; Katsumata, M; Hirata, Y; Hirata, K; Shimizu, T; Kawada, T (2009). "Effect of phytoncide from trees on human natural killer cell function". International journal of immunopathology and pharmacology 22 (4): 951–9. PMID 20074458. 
  • Park, Bum Jin; Yuko Tsunetsugu; Tamami Kasetani; Takahide Kagawa; Yoshifumi Miyazaki (2 May 2010). "The physiological effects of Shinrin-yoku (taking in the forest atmosphere or forest bathing): evidence from field experiments in 24 forests across Japan". Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine 15 (1): 18–26. doi:10.1007/s12199-009-0086-9. PMC 2793346. PMID 19568835.