Formula 18

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F18
Formula 18 catamaran sailboat
Development
Designervarious
Year1994
DesignBox Rule
Brandvarious
Builder(s)various
Boat
Crew2 person
Boat weight180 kg (400 lb)
Draft1.40 m (4 ft 7 in) (upwind)
Trapezehelm and crew
Hull
Typecatamaran
LOH5.52 m (18 ft 1 in)
Beam2.60 m (8 ft 6 in)
Hull appendages
Keel/board typeoptional: daggerboards / centerboards
Rig
Mast length9.10 m (29 ft 10 in) (maximum)
Sails
Mainsail area17 m2 (180 sq ft) (mainsail and mast combined area)
Jib/genoa area4.3 m2 (46 sq ft)
Gennaker area21 m2 (230 sq ft)
Upwind sail area21.3 m2 (229 sq ft)
Downwind sail area42.3 m2 (455 sq ft)
Racing
Class associationInternational Formula 18 Class Association

The Formula 18 class, abbreviated F18, is a non-foiling, restricted development,[1] formula-design sport catamaran class. It was started in the early 1990s and quickly grew getting class recognition by World Sailing, with large racing fleets all over the globe.

Design goals[edit]

Formula 18 catamaran with gennaker

The overall objective of the class is to offer popular, safe, exciting and fair racing in 18-foot catamarans.

The F18 class is a "box rule[2]" class, which means that any boat that adheres to the limited set of general design specifications may participate in all F18 races. This has led to a score of homebuilders and professional builders to design their own F18 boats and race them in this class. However, it is the mainstream production F18 designs that have dominated the top of the class. The presence of multiple boat builders and sailmakers in the class stimulates innovation and helps to limit costs to sailors.

The F18 box rule allows limited development, striking a balance between the class remaining close to the front edge of multihull design and preserving capital invested in the fleet. Since its introduction, the F18 has seen a steady evolution in both hull and sail shapes, which has led to remarkably improved performance in terms of both handling and speed. The latest innovation adoption was the introduction of the mainsail "decksweeper" at the 2017 Worlds. Crewed by experienced teams F18s can reach speeds of over 13 knots upwind and more than 20 knots downwind.

The relatively high boat weight facilitates robust construction and limits the benefits from fragile advanced construction techniques, keeping costs down and increasing longevity. It also supports adding interchangeable parts to the platform, for example for use of the platform as a foiling catamaran outside F18 racing. Moreover, the relatively high boat weight reduces the sensitivity of performance to crew weight.

The F18 class also uses an equalizing system, with crew extra weights, to offer competitive racing for a larger crew weight range.

Class development[edit]

Starting line during 2015 F18 Worlds in Kiel

The Formula 18 was created in 1994 by Olivier Bovyn and Pierre-Charles Barraud to introduce first across the line / elapsed time (versus handicap / corrected time) competition to the sport catamaran sailing community at an affordable cost. The concept became popular very quickly and due to its fast growth, the F18 attained ISAF Recognised Class status already in 1996, within 18 months after its inception.

Mainly a Europe-based class at the beginning, class membership eventually spread to Australia and the Americas and the F18 class currently has full racing circuits in many places around the globe. Several thousand boats have been sold over the years. The F18 attracts both female and male as well as mixed crews and it is particularly popular among teams with combined crew weights of approximately 140-170 kg.

Its design and popularity has led the F18 to be the boat of choice for long-distance raid events such as the Stockholm Archipelago Raid, the Costarmoricaine, and the Worrell 1000.

The boats are equipped with double trapezes and a gennaker, and as a result, they require a skilled and physically fit crew to be competitive. However, many crews also use this catamaran for purely recreational sailing.

Over time the class has seen many talented sailors who also made their appearances in Olympic sailing classes, the America’s Cup, Jules Verne Trophy and Volvo Ocean Race, including Carolijn Brouwer, Glenn Ashby, Darren Bundock, Jimmy Spithill, Mitch Booth and Franck Cammas.

The Formula 18 class is governed by the International Formula 18 Class Association[3] and is recognized as a World Sailing Multihull Class.

The early success of the F18 class during the 1990s inspired the founding of the Formula 16 class. In addition, a number of Formula 18 designs have gone on to have competitive one-design racing including the Hobie Tiger, Hobie Wildcat and Nacra Infusion.

Events[edit]

World Championships[edit]

Year Gold Silver Bronze
World Championship Medallists[4]
2000 Erquy
 France
 Mitch Booth (NED)
 Herbert Dercksen (NED)
 Jean-Christophe Mourniac (FRA)
 Philippe Mourniac (FRA)
 Andrew Landenberger (AUS)
 Philippe Neiras (FRA)
2001 Parkstone
 Great Britain
 Mitch Booth (NED)
 Herbert Dercksen (NED)
 Jean-Christophe Mourniac (FRA)
 Philippe Mourniac (FRA)
 Billy Besson (FRA)
 Arnaud Jarlegan (FRA)
2002 Travemünde
 Germany
 Mitch Booth (NED)
 Herbert Dercksen (NED)
 Jean-Christophe Mourniac (FRA)
 Philippe Mourniac (FRA)
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 Luca Remagnino (ITA)
2003 Koksijde
 Belgium
 Emmanuel Boulogne (FRA)
 Vincent Boulogne (FRA)
 Gavin Colby (AUS)
 Cory Camenisch (SUI)
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 Glen Ashby (AUS)
2004 Punta Ala
 Italy
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 Glen Ashby (AUS)
 Mitch Booth (NED)
 Herbert Dercksen (NED)
 Gavin Colby (AUS)
 Cory Camenisch (SUI)}
2005 Hook of Holland
 Netherlands
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 Glen Ashby (AUS)
 Mitch Booth (NED)
 Herbert Dercksen (NED)
 Helge Sach (GER)
 Christian Sach (GER)
2006 Hyères
 France
 Helge Sach (GER)
 Christian Sach (GER)
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 Glen Ashby (AUS)
 Andrew Landenberger (AUS)
 Felix Egner (GER)
2007 Yeppoon
 Australia
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 Glen Ashby (AUS)
 Mitch Booth (NED)
 Pim Nieuwenhuis (NED)
 Billy Besson (FRA)
 Arnaud Jarlegan (FRA)
2008 Nigrán
 Spain
 Coen de Koning (NED)
 Jeroen van Leeuwen (NED)
 Franck Cammas (FRA)
 Jeremy Lagarrigue (FRA)
 Mischa Heemskerk (NED)
 Bastiaan Tentij (NED)
2009 Knokke
 Belgium
 Coen de Koning (NED)
 Thijs Visser (NED)
 Rob Wilson (GBR)
 Marcus Lynch (GBR)
 Hugh Styles (GBR)
 Ferdinand van West (NED)
2010 Erquy
 France
 Olivier Backes (FRA)
 Arnaud Jarlegan (FRA)
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 William Howden (GBR)
 Hugh Styles (GBR)
 Ferdinand van West (NED)
2011 Balatonfüred
 Hungary
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 Jeroen van Leeuwen (NED)
 Mischa Heemskerk (NED)
 Bastiaan Tentij (NED)
 Vittoro Bissaro (ITA)
 Lamberto Cesari (ITA)
2012 Long Beach  United States  Olivier Backes (FRA)
 Matthieu Vandame (FRA)
 Oscar Zeekant (NED)
 Karel Begemann (NED)
 Billy Besson (FRA)
 Jeremie Laguarrigue (FRA)
2013 Grosseto
 Italy
 Billy Besson (FRA)
 Jeremie Lagarrigue (FRA)
 Hugh Styles (GBR)
 Richard Mason (GBR)
 Mitch Booth (ESP)
 Jordi Booth (ESP)
2014 Bangor
 Northern Ireland
 Gunnar Larsen (NED)
 Ferdinand van West (NED)
 Gurvan Bontemps (FRA)
 Benjamin Amiot (FRA)
 Taylor Reiss (USA)
 Matthew Whitehead (USA)
2015 Kiel
 Germany
 Gunnar Larsen (NED)
 Ferdinand van West (NED)
 Oscar Zeekant (NED)
 Karel Begemann (NED)
 Glenn Ashby (AUS)
 Brett Goodall (AUS)
2016 Buenos Aires
 Argentina
 Pablo Völker (ARG)
 Juan Martín Benitez (ARG)
 Cruz Gonzalez Smith (ARG)
 Mariano Heuser (ARG)
 Jason Hess (GUA)
 Nicolás Schargorodsky (GUA)
2017 Vallensbæk
 Denmark
 Mischa Heemskerk (NED)
 Stephan Dekker (NED)
 Patrick Demesmaeker (BEL)
 Gilles Tas (BEL)
 Jolbert van Dijk (NED)
 Frank de Waard (NED)
2018 Sarasota
 United States
 Iordanis Paschalidis (GRE)
 Konstantinos Trigkonis (GRE)
 Michael Easton (USA)
 Tripp Burd (USA)
 Taylor Reiss (USA)
 Matthew Whitehead (USA)
2019
 Spain
AUS 888 - EXPLODER SCORPION
 Darren Bundock (AUS)
 Conor Nicholas (AUS)
GRE 7 - REDBULL
 Iordanis Paschalidis (GRE)
 Konstantinos Trigkonis (GRE)
ARG 11 - OH!
 Cruz GONZALEZ SMITH (ARG)
 Mariano HEUSER (ARG)

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Constitution". Formula 18. 2018-12-15. Retrieved 2018-12-15.
  2. ^ "Class Rules - Formula 18 Catamaran". sailing.org. Retrieved 2017-10-10.
  3. ^ "Formula 18". Formula 18. Retrieved 2017-10-10.
  4. ^ http://www.f18-international.org/hall-of-fame/