Formula 1 98

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Formula 1 98
Formula 1 98
PAL region Cover art
Developer(s)Visual Science
Publisher(s)Psygnosis
Platform(s)PlayStation
Release
  • EU: 30 October 1998
  • NA: 30 November 1998
Genre(s)Racing simulation
Mode(s)Single Player, Multiplayer

Formula 1 98 is a racing video game and the sequel to the 1997 video game Formula 1 97. The game was first released in Europe on 30 October 1998 for the Sony PlayStation, and was developed by Psygnosis which held the official Formula 1 game licence at the time.

Jarno Trulli appears on the front cover of this edition, however some other versions (such as the British version) have the 1998 World Champion, Mika Häkkinen, on the front cover, and in the United States version, it has Eddie Irvine on the cover. The British version of the front cover also has the ITV logo, the official broadcasters of F1 in the UK at the time. The game is comparible to other racing games such as Need for Speed.

Overview[edit]

Following the departure of Bizarre Creations, Psygnosis offered Reflections Interactive the chance to develop Formula 1 98. However, they pulled out to make Driver. Visual Science were hired to make the game. The game was rushed for release to coincide with the final race of the 1998 Formula One season. As a result of this the game ended up being very poorly received by various gaming publications.[1]Despite this, the game was a bestseller in the UK.[2]

Circuits[edit]

The game features 16 official Formula One circuits based on the 1998 Formula One season plus 2 hidden tracks which can be accessed with cheat codes. One is based upon a Hippodrome although it says "Coloseum" in the selection screen and the other one is a Stunttrack.

Teams and drivers[edit]

The game features all of the official teams and drivers that competed in the 1998 Formula One season, although like with its predecessor, Formula 1 97, Jacques Villeneuve's name and image are not featured due to him copyrighting both. The game refers to him as 'Williams Driver 1'.

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
GameRankings70%[3]
Review scores
PublicationScore
CVG3/5 stars[4]
EGM6.5/10[5]
GamePro3.5/5 stars[6]
GameSpot7.5/10[7]
IGN7.3/10[8]

The game received "average" reviews according to the review aggregation website GameRankings.[3] PlayStation Power gave it a review of 69%, noting that "Psygnosis have managed to cock up the one uncockupable licence on the PlayStation" and that it was far worse than both F1 '97 and the original F1 game on the PlayStation.[9]

In February 1999, Formula 1 98 received a "Platinum" sales award from the Verband der Unterhaltungssoftware Deutschland (VUD),[10] indicating sales of at least 200,000 units across Germany, Austria and Switzerland.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Obvious Beta". TV Tropes. Retrieved 30 May 2017.
  2. ^ "UK PlayStation sales chart". Official UK PlayStation Magazine. No. 40. Future plc. 25 December 1998.
  3. ^ a b "Formula 1 98 for PlayStation". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  4. ^ Fulljames, Stephen (1998). "PlayStation Review: Formula One 98". Computer and Video Games. Future plc. Archived from the original on 29 May 2007. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  5. ^ EGM staff (January 1999). "Formula 1 98". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 114. Ziff Davis.
  6. ^ Air Hendrix (1999). "Formula 1 '98 Review for PlayStation on GamePro.com". GamePro. IDG Entertainment. Archived from the original on 28 September 2004. Retrieved 18 January 2019.
  7. ^ Smith, Josh (21 December 1998). "Formula 1 98 Review". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  8. ^ Perry, Douglass C. (14 December 1998). "Formula 1 '98". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  9. ^ "Formula 1 98". PlayStation Power. No. 33. December 1998. p. 106–8.
  10. ^ "Erste Doppel-Platin Auszeichnungen durch den VUD". Verband der Unterhaltungssoftware Deutschland (in German). Paderborn. 18 February 1999. Archived from the original on 12 March 2000.
  11. ^ "VUD Sales Awards: November 2002". Verband der Unterhaltungssoftware Deutschland (in German). Paderborn. Archived from the original on 10 January 2003.

External links[edit]