Forsinard railway station

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Forsinard National Rail
Forsinard Station - geograph.org.uk - 89107.jpg
Location
Place Forsinard
Local authority Highland
Coordinates 58°21′24″N 3°53′50″W / 58.3568°N 3.8971°W / 58.3568; -3.8971Coordinates: 58°21′24″N 3°53′50″W / 58.3568°N 3.8971°W / 58.3568; -3.8971
Grid reference NC891425
Operations
Station code FRS
Managed by Abellio ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2011/12 Increase 1,970
2012/13 Increase 2,088
2013/14 Decrease 1,718
2014/15 Decrease 1,456
2015/16 Increase 1,516
History
Original company Sutherland and Caithness Railway
Pre-grouping Highland Railway
Post-grouping London, Midland and Scottish Railway
28 July 1874 Opened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Forsinard from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal

Forsinard railway station is a railway station serving the village of Forsinard in the Highland council area in the north of Scotland. It is located on the Far North Line.

History[edit]

The Sutherland and Caithness Railway was authorised in 1871, and the single-track line, which connected Helmsdale with Wick and Thurso, opened on 28 July 1874. One of the original stations was that at Forsinard.[1][2][3] A crossing loop is located at the station to allow trains to pass each other.

From 1 January 1923 the station was owned by the London Midland and Scottish Railway. In September 1925, it was recorded as being 243 miles 34 chains (391.8 km) from Perth, measured via Carr Bridge and Inverness station.[4]

The station building is now used by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds for its Flow Country visitors' centre.

Services[edit]

There are four departures per day in each direction, southbound to Dingwall and Inverness and northbound to Wick via Thurso. One train per day each way calls on a Sunday.[5]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vallance, H.A.; Clinker, C.R.; Lambert, Anthony J. (1985) [1938]. The Highland Railway (4th ed.). Newton Abbot: David & Charles. p. 37. ISBN 0-946537-24-0. 
  2. ^ Butt, R.V.J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations. Yeovil: Patrick Stephens Ltd. p. 99. ISBN 1-85260-508-1. R508. 
  3. ^ "The Sunderland and Caithness Railway". The Scotsman. British Newspaper Archive. 27 July 1874. Retrieved 14 August 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive. (subscription required (help)). 
  4. ^ Vallance, Clinker & Lambert 1985, p. 183
  5. ^ Table 239 National Rail timetable, May 2016.

External links[edit]


Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Kinbrace   Abellio ScotRail
Far North Line
  Altnabreac