Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville

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Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville
Alberta electoral district
FortSaskatchewanVegreville in Alberta.jpg
2010 boundaries
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Alberta
MLA
 
 
 
Jessica Littlewood
New Democratic
District created 2003
First contested 2004
Last contested 2015

Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville is a provincial electoral district in Alberta, Canada. The district is mandated to return a single member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta using the first-past-the-post method of voting.

The electoral district, which is located in rural east central Alberta just east of Edmonton, was created in the 2004 boundary redistribution. The current boundaries of the district comprise parts of Vegreville-Viking, Redwater and Clover Bar-Fort Saskatchewan. The district is named after the small city of Fort Saskatchewan and the town of Vegreville.

The current representative for this district is New Democrat Jessica Littlewood who was first elected in the 2015 provincial election. The district has also been represented by past Progressive Conservative Premier Ed Stelmach.

History[edit]

The electoral district was created in the 2003 boundary redistribution from the old electoral districts of Clover Bar-Fort Saskatchewan, Redwater and Vegreville-Viking.

The 2010 boundary redistribution saw significant changes made to the district with land residing in Beaver County south of Tofield being moved to Battle River-Wainwright and land in Strathcona County north of Alberta Highway 16 being transferred into the electoral district from the old Strathcona electoral district.[1]

Boundary history[edit]

Members of the Legislative Assembly for Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville[3]
Assembly Years Member Party
See Clover Bar-Fort Saskatchewan 1993–2004, Redwater 1993–2004
and Vegreville-Viking 1993–2004
26th 2004-2008 Ed Stelmach Progressive
Conservative
27th 2008-2012
28th 2012-2015 Jacquie Fenske
29th 2015–present Jessica Littlewood New Democrat

Electoral history[edit]

The electoral district of Fort Saskatchewan was created in the boundary redistribution of 2004. The first election held in the district saw longtime Vegreville—Viking incumbent Ed Stelmach win the new district of his party. He took just under half the popular vote, defeating four other candidates.

Stelmach became leader of the Progressive Conservatives and premier of the province in December 2006. He stood for re-election in 2008 winning a landslide of nearly 78% of the popular vote. Progressive Conservative Jacquie Fenske won the district in the 2012 provincial election.

In the 2015 election, NDP candidate Jessica Littlewood won with a majority of 2,870, defeating Jacquie Fenske who finished second.

Legislature results[edit]

2004 general election[edit]

Alberta general election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %[4]
Progressive Conservative Ed Stelmach 6,160 48.34%
Liberal Peter Schneider 3,160 24.80%
New Democratic Wes Buyarski 1,633 12.82%
Alberta Alliance Byron King 1,411 11.07%
Social Credit Mark Patterson 379 2.97%
Total valid votes 12,743 100.00%
Rejected, spoiled, and declined 47
Electors / turnout 24,831 51.49%
Progressive Conservative notional hold

2008 general election[edit]

Alberta general election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±%[5]
Progressive Conservative Ed Stelmach 11,169 78.13% +29.79%
Liberal Earl Woods 1,343 9.39% -15.41%
New Democratic Clayton Marsden 1,233 8.63% -4.19%
Greens Ryan Scheie 551 3.85%
Total valid votes 14,296 100.00%
Rejected, spoiled, and declined 63
Electors / turnout 29,513 48.65% -2.84%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing 22.61%

2012 general election[edit]

Alberta general election, 2012
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Jacquie Fenske 8,366 49.28% -28.85%
Wildrose Shannon Stubbs 5,800 34.17%
New Democratic Chris Fulmer 1,556 9.17% +0.54%
Liberal Spencer Dunn 845 4.98% -4.41%
Evergreen Matt Levicki 229 1.35% -2.5%
Independent Peter Schneider 180 1.06%
Total valid votes 16,976
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -31.51%

2015 general election[edit]

Alberta general election, 2015
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Jessica Littlewood 7,910 45.00% +35.83%
Progressive Conservative Jacquie Fenske 5,040 28.67% -20.61%
Wildrose Joe Gosselin 3,610 20.54% -13.63
Liberal Peter Schneider 448 2.55% -2.43%
Alberta Party Derek Christensen 301 1.71%
Green Allison Anderson 268 1.52% +0.17
Total valid votes 17,577 100.00%
New Democratic gain from Progressive Conservative Swing 28.22%

Senate nominee results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election results: Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville[6] Turnout 52.13%
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Votes % Ballots Rank
Progressive Conservative Betty Unger 4,823 14.45% 45.03% 2
Progressive Conservative Bert Brown 4,007 12.00% 37.41% 1
  Independent Link Byfield 3,805 11.40% 35.53% 4
Progressive Conservative Cliff Breitkreuz 3,693 11.05% 34.48% 3
Alberta Alliance Michael Roth 3,168 9.49% 29.58% 7
Alberta Alliance Gary Horan 2,984 8.94% 27.86% 10
Alberta Alliance Vance Gough 2,875 8.61% 26.84% 8
Progressive Conservative David Usherwood 2,873 8.60% 26.83% 6
  Independent Tom Sindlinger 2,597 7.78% 24.25% 9
Progressive Conservative Jim Silye 2,561 7.68% 23.91% 5
Total Votes 33,386 100%
Total Ballots 10,710 3.12 Votes Per Ballot
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 2,235

Voters had the option of selecting four candidates on the ballot

2012 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

Student Vote results[edit]

2004 election[edit]

Participating Schools[7]
Andrew School
Fort Saskatchewan Christian School
Holden School
John Paul II High School
Lamont Elementary School
Our Lady of the Angels
Rudolph Henning School
Ryley School
Tofield School
Vegreville Composite High School

On November 19, 2004, a student vote was conducted at participating Alberta schools to parallel the 2004 Alberta general election results. The vote was designed to educate students and simulate the electoral process for persons who have not yet reached the legal majority. The vote was conducted in 80 of the 83 provincial electoral districts with students voting for actual election candidates. Schools with a large student body that reside in another electoral district had the option to vote for candidates outside of the electoral district then where they were physically located.

2004 Alberta Student Vote results[8]
Affiliation Candidate Votes %
  Progressive Conservative Ed Stelmach 448 40.73%
  Liberal Peter Schneider 197 17.91%
  NDP Wes Buyarski 173 15.73%
Alberta Alliance Byron King 143 13.00%
  Social Credit Mark Patterson 139 12.63%
Total 1,100 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 134

2012 election[edit]

2012 Alberta Student Vote results
Affiliation Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative Jacquie Fenske %
Wildrose Shannon Stubbs
  Liberal Spencer Dunn %
  NDP Chris Fulmer %
Total ' 100%

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Proposed Electoral Division Areas, Boundaries, and Names for Alberta" (PDF). Alberta Electoral Boundaries Commission. June 2010. p. 20. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 27, 2011. Retrieved January 14, 2012. 
  2. ^ "E‑4.1". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 2003. pp. 41–43. 
  3. ^ "Members of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta 1905-2006" (PDF). Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 30, 2007. Retrieved February 27, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville Statement of Official Results 2004 Alberta general election" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Retrieved March 9, 2010. 
  5. ^ The Report on the March 3, 2008 Provincial General Election of the Twenty-seventh Legislative Assembly. Elections Alberta. July 28, 2008. pp. 418–423. 
  6. ^ "Senate Nominee Election 2004 Tabulation of Official Results" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 4, 2009. Retrieved February 28, 2010. 
  7. ^ "School by School results". Student Vote Canada. Archived from the original on October 5, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-27. 
  8. ^ "Riding by Riding Results - the Candidates". Student Vote Canada. Archived from the original on February 13, 2012. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 

External links[edit]