Fortnite Creative

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Fortnite Creative
Fortnite Creative Cover.png
Promotional artwork
Developer(s)Epic Games
Publisher(s)Epic Games
SeriesFortnite
EngineUnreal Engine 5
Platform(s)
ReleaseDecember 6, 2018
Genre(s)Sandbox
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Fortnite Creative is a sandbox game, developed and published by Epic Games, part of the video game Fortnite. It was released on December 6, 2018 for Microsoft Windows, macOS, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, iOS, Nintendo Switch, and Android.

Gameplay[edit]

In the Fortnite meta-game, players can create structures on a private island and share them with up to 16 players (including the owner) for various multiplayer game modes with customizable rules.[1][2]

Players can place, copy and paste, move and erase objects, including ground tiles, items, and game buildings.[3][4] There are limits to the amount of structures on an island.[1][3] Players place objects from a palette with items of their choosing. They can also choose to build from predetermined structures like buildings.[2][3]

Fortnite Creative loads into a hub island from which other islands can be accessed, most prominently those deemed popular by Epic Games and in the community.[2][4] Players have the option to play custom games where they can practice their skills, compete against friends, or play minigames. Each player can have up to four private islands that they can build on.[2] In the game, players can walk, jump and fly.[1][2] Players edit the world using a mobile phone that their character holds in the hand. After a minigame is played, the island is reset to its previous state before the game started.[3]

A player building in Creative

The islands could previously be nominated to appear in The Block, a 25 × 25 tile area in Fortnite Battle Royale, which replaced Risky Reels in the top right corner of the map in Chapter 1 Season 7.[1][5] In Chapter 1 Season 8 The Block was moved to the northwest of the map, replacing the motel.[6] After 4 years, Fortnite has announced The Block 2.0 during Fortnite Chapter 3 Season 2. This is replacing Tilted Towers; which in the center of the map. Players created their versions of "The Block 2.0" in Creative.[7]

Development[edit]

During the development of Creative mode, Epic Games prioritized completing quickly over creating a perfect mode upon release.[8] Because of this, there were several bugs upon release. Due to their focus on speed, Epic Games created the prefabs system, instead of the full selection of blocks seen in other creative mode games.[8] Epic Games was able to launch Fortnite Creative earlier than planned.[8] Epic has updated creative mode several times since it was launched, fixing bugs, adding new buildings, and new island types. A scoreboard was added during the 8.40 patch.[9]

While Epic has used Fortnite: Battle Royale to perform a number of promotional events, such as virtual concerts, Epic partnered with Time to create a special Fortnite Creative area dedicated to celebrating the 58th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech on August 28, 2021.[10]

Release[edit]

The game mode was announced on December 5, 2018. A trailer was released and Epic Games partnered with nine YouTubers to create demonstration videos of the meta-game.[11] Fortnite Battle Royale season 7 battle pass owners were able to play the game starting December 6.[1] Players without a battle pass could join islands created by players with a battle pass.[12] The meta-game was released for all players on December 13, 2018.[1]

Reception[edit]

Fortnite Creative has been compared to the 2011 sandbox game Minecraft. Henry St Leger of TechRadar wrote that this Fortnite installment shies away from taking inspiration from the battle royale game PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds towards taking inspiration from Minecraft. He called the meta-game "basically a blueprint" and wrote that it could become a "serious rival" to Minecraft due to Fortnite's infrastructure and player base.[1]

The meta-game was expected to keep a healthy player base for Fortnite. Polygon's Ben Kuchera wrote that the game is "a powerful new tool" and that "[sharing] your own maps and game modes, or just using the tools to create wild videos, is going to go a long way toward keeping Fortnite fresh for the foreseeable future."[11]

Players have recreated various structures in Fortnite Creative; these include the Star Wars starship Millennium Falcon and Castle Black from Game of Thrones. Others have used musical tiles (which can be found inside of the Creative Inventory) to perform songs popular as Internet memes.[13] Maps from other video games such as Counter-Strike and Call of Duty have also been recreated in the meta-game by players.[14][15] Locations and plots from TV shows and movies such as survival drama television series Squid Game have been recreated in the Creative gamemode.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g St Leger, Henry (December 13, 2018). "Fortnite Creative mode just launched for all players – here's why you should care". TechRadar. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e England, Rachel (December 5, 2018). "'Fortnite' is getting a big new Creative mode". Engadget. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d McWhertor, Michael (December 5, 2018). "Fortnite's new creative mode coming with season 7". Polygon. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  4. ^ a b Hoggins, Tom (December 5, 2018). "Fortnite Season 7: Creative mode confirmed by Epic following leak". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  5. ^ Davenport, James (December 7, 2018). "'The Block' will bring stuff from Fortnite's creative mode to battle royale". PC Gamer. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  6. ^ Ruppert, Liana (February 28, 2019). "All 'Fortnite' Season 8 Map Changes". comicbook. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  7. ^ Warby, Nathan (June 9, 2022). "All "How to enter 'Fortnite' The Block 2: Create your own POI at Tilted Towers"". Charlie Intel. Retrieved July 1, 2022.
  8. ^ a b c "state of development creative". Epic Games' Fortnite. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  9. ^ "v8.40 Patch Notes". Epic Games' Fortnite. Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  10. ^ Francis, Bryant (August 26, 2021). "Epic and Time Magazine debut interactive MLK Jr. exhibit in Fortnite". Game Developer. Retrieved August 26, 2021.
  11. ^ a b Kuchera, Ben (December 5, 2018). "Fortnite Creative to launch tomorrow for Battle Pass owners". Polygon. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  12. ^ Reynolds, Matthew (December 5, 2018). "Fortnite Creative Mode release date, Private Island early access explained". Eurogamer. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  13. ^ Jones, Ali (February 1, 2019). "Fortnite players are making music, from Undertale to Smash Mouth". PCGamesN. Retrieved February 8, 2019.
  14. ^ Doster, S. E. (December 11, 2018). "Fortnite Players Are Recreating Classic Call of Duty Levels". Kotaku. Retrieved February 8, 2019.
  15. ^ Davenport, James (December 17, 2018). "How to play de_dust2 in Fortnite". PC Gamer. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  16. ^ Gökhan Çakır (October 22, 2021). "Best Fortnite Squid Game Map Codes". Dot Esports.

External links[edit]