Foss (band)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Foss
A black-and-white photograph of three young men looking into the camera. Beto O'Rourke, at left, is wearing a floral-pattern dress and sports a shoulder-length hairdo and facial hair.
Foss on the cover of the 7-inch record The El Paso Pussycats (1993). Beto O'Rourke, at left, is wearing a dress. The photo was later used by the Republican Party of Texas, in an attempt to mock O'Rourke.[1]

Left to right: O'Rourke, Klahr, and Stevens (Bixler-Zavala not pictured, but a photo of him can be seen on the record's back cover.)[2]
Background information
OriginEl Paso, Texas, U.S.
Genres
Years active1993–1995
Websitemyspace.com/fossband (defunct; archival link via the Internet Archive)
Past members

Foss was an American rock band formed in El Paso, Texas in the early 1990s. While the band was short-lived and obscure in its own time, it garnered renewed attention when one of its former members, Beto O'Rourke, campaigned in the 2018 US Senate election in Texas as the Democratic candidate against incumbent Republican Ted Cruz. Another of Foss's members, Cedric Bixler-Zavala, went on to become the singer for post-hardcore band At the Drive-In and progressive rock band the Mars Volta, and a member of numerous other musical projects.

Foss, described as a post-hardcore band, incorporated elements of punk rock, emo, and indie rock styles of the period into its sound. Influenced by music from the independent label Dischord Records and punk zines like Maximumrocknroll, the members of Foss espoused the DIY ("Do-It-Yourself") ethic. The band released a handful of recordings and embarked on two tours, spanning parts of the United States and Canada. Foss appeared on Let's Get Real With Bill Lowrey, an evangelical show on El Paso public-access television, after tricking the show's producers into believing they were a Christian rock band. The band's performance has since surfaced on YouTube.

The DIY ethos O'Rourke had first encountered in the punk scene informed some of his later political decisions, such as his Senate campaign's pledge not to accept financial contributions from PACs (political action committees). During the campaign, the press often remarked on Foss and O'Rourke's connection to Bixler-Zavala, who was by then a well-known musician. Several commentators said the fact that O'Rourke had once been a member of a punk band boosted his credibility, image, and political appeal, particularly among younger voters. The Republican Party of Texas, intending to mock O'Rourke, tweeted the cover of Foss's record The El Paso Pussycats, which depicts O'Rourke wearing a dress.

History[edit]

Background[edit]

Stanton Street in El Paso, Texas, 1972—the same year O'Rourke was born. As an alienated teen, O'Rourke found a sense of community in El Paso's small punk scene.[3]

Beto O'Rourke had been a fan of rock music since childhood, when he listened to bands like The Beatles with his sister. In eight grade, O'Rourke was introduced to punk rock through The Clash's 1979 album London Calling, which he later called "a revelation".[4] By the time he was 14 or 15 years old, he started going to local punk shows. He soon discovered Dischord Records, a Washington, D.C.-based independent label with a catalog of punk music, and began reading punk zines like Maximumrocknroll and Flipside.[5]

Born and raised in El Paso, O'Rourke felt alienated from the city as an adolescent in the 1980s. He told The Texas Observer that, in the El Paso of his youth, "There was nothing dangerous. There was no energy. There was no risk."[3] In a profile of O'Rourke for The Washington Post, Ben Terris wrote that the young O'Rourke "wanted nothing more than to get out of town", and that the band Foss was formed "with the hopes of traveling the world".[6] El Paso's punk scene, though small, helped O'Rourke find a sense of community in the city.[3]

O'Rourke left El Paso High School and began attending an all-male boarding school in Virginia, but during breaks he returned to El Paso and continued immersing himself in its punk scene. He frequented DIY shows at the local venue Campus Queen, where shows were organized by Ed Ivey of the punk band Rhythm Pigs. O'Rourke met Cedric Bixler-Zavala when the latter played a show at the Campus Queen in a Misfits cover band.[4] Bixler-Zavala later said "[b]eing with [O'Rourke] is what turned me into the kind of musician I am today" and "[t]he way I make art, I learned it from Beto. He was learning as he went along, too, but he was sort of my older brother/mentor."[7][8]

O'Rourke joined his first band, called Swipe, after he left El Paso to attend Columbia University in New York. Swipe played shows at bars and clubs in New York and once opened for the Olympia, Washington-based punk band Fitz of Depression.[9]

Recordings, tours, and public-access television appearance[edit]

Cedric Bixler-Zavala, a founding member of Foss, is better known as the singer of At the Drive-In and the Mars Volta (pictured performing with At the Drive-In in 2012).

O'Rourke and Bixler-Zavala formed Foss along with Mike Stevens and Arlo Klahr.[4] They took the name "Foss" from the Icelandic word for "waterfall".[10] The members of Foss formed their own label, Western Breed Records, and issued a 7-inch record The El Paso Pussycats.[11] Reportedly titled after a failed television pilot about crime-fighting women, The El Paso Pussycats shows O'Rourke wearing a floral-pattern dress on its cover.[1][12] The label Western Breed later issued some of the earliest releases by Bixler-Zavala's band At the Drive-In.[11]

Foss embarked on two tours of North America during O'Rourke's summer breaks following his sophomore and junior years in college.[13] O'Rourke and Klahr organized the tours with the help of Book Your Own Fucking Life, a DIY guide published by Maximumrocknroll that provided resources and contacts for touring bands.[12] While on tour, Foss met Feist, who was later a member of Broken Social Scene and solo artist.[4]

External video
"Foss on Let's Get Real TV show - El Paso, TX- 1994 Pt 3 - The Song" (9:59) – a 1994 Foss live performance on the public-access television show Let's Get Real, via YouTube.
"Beto O'Rourke with Foss - Live El Paso, Texas 1994" (2:52) — a second clip of Foss performing over the show's credit sequence, via YouTube.

In 1994, an El Paso public-access television show, Let's Get Real With Bill Lowrey, broadcast a Foss performance and interview. Because it was an evangelical program, Foss told the producers they played gospel and Christian rock in order to get on the show.[11][6] The band quickly wrote a new song for their television debut.[11] The host, Lowrey, later told The Washington Post: "Oh yeah, they kind of pulled a fast one on me. But we enjoyed it. Mostly I can't believe he grew up to be a functioning member of society."[6]

Clips of Foss's performance on Let's Get Real later surfaced on YouTube. Matt Miller of Esquire described Foss' performance as "absolute chaos with the band hopping around and people screaming—you can imagine elderly '90s Texans turning this on and being absolutely terrified".[14] Matthew Adams of Dallas News called the performance "complete chaos", noting that O'Rourke's musical skills had seemed to improve judging by musical performances during his 2018 Senate campaign.[15]

Style and influences[edit]

Andy Cush of Spin described Foss as a post-hardcore band.[5] Foss is also considered emo-punk, as first-wave emo was a significant influence on the band's sound.[9][16][17] O'Rourke, a fan of bands on Dischord Records like Minor Threat and Rites of Spring, took inspiration from the label's independence and commitment to the DIY ethic, as he told Cush in 2017:

"What I also really loved was the way that they did it. They were running this out of a house. They started their own label, they were booking their own tours, everybody wrote their own songs. There was an honest ethic to everything they did. ...

It was people instead of a machine in every way possible. And that, for me, could describe punk rock. It was people sharing their stories in a very honest, direct, powerful way. It was so completely at odds to corporate rock'n'roll, the overly produced, test-marketed, focus-grouped kind of music that was coming out over the radio. There were no intermediaries. It was you and the musician, physically at the show, or maybe buying their record through the pages of [Maximumrocknroll]. ... All of that stuff had a big impact on me."[5]

Bixler-Zavala recalled that O'Rourke introduced him to punk and indie bands like Rites of Spring and Dinosaur Jr., which shifted him away from his earlier musical interest in dub and rock bands like the Grateful Dead, The Black Crowes, and Blue Cheer.[7] Klahr, a fan of punk and indie music from Australia and New Zealand, introduced his Foss bandmates to bands like The Saints, The Clean, and The Scientists.[5]

Rolling Stone posted the Foss song "Rise"—courtesy of O'Rourke—in 2018, making the band's music widely available for the first time. Rolling Stone's Tessa Stuart said the song was "lo-fi slacker rock" stylistically indebted to Fugazi and Guided by Voices.[4] According to Eric Grubbs of the Dallas Observer, "Rise" was akin to "13 Songs-era Fugazi by way of Pavement's lo-fi masterpiece Slanted and Enchanted".[7] Eduardo Cepeda of Remezcla detected the influence of Rites of Spring and Government Issue.[12] Michael Roffman at Consequence of Sound said "Rise" was a "chalky slice of alternative rock that wouldn't be out of place on a compilation album alongside Sunny Day Real Estate".[18]

After Foss[edit]

Foss disbanded in part because O'Rourke realized he "wasn't that good at" playing music. In addition, O'Rourke said, his father pressured him about the student loans he had taken out to attend Columbia.[6]

After leaving Foss, O'Rourke performed with several other bands, including Fragile Gang,[7] the Swedes,[19] and the Sheeps.[20] Between 1999 and 2002, O'Rourke ran an alt-weekly newspaper, Stanton Street, with his former Foss bandmate Stevens as the managing editor.[21] When O'Rourke was a member of the El Paso City Council, he said his former Foss bandmates had "all gone on to successful musical careers, confirming their talent and my lack thereof".[22]

Bixler-Zavala later gained notice as the singer of post-hardcore band At the Drive-In and Grammy Award-winning progressive rock band the Mars Volta, in addition to numerous other musical endeavors.[14][16] The first published mention of Foss came in the webzine Buddyhead, in a post published shortly before the release of At the Drive-In's third album Relationship of Command (2000), when Bixler-Zavala noted his time in the band.[7]

Impact on Beto O'Rourke's political career[edit]

Foss became the subject of renewed attention when Beto O'Rourke campaigned in the in the 2018 US Senate election in Texas.

In March 2017, when O'Rourke announced he was running in the 2018 US Senate election in Texas, numerous publications commented on O'Rourke's musical past. Music news outlets like Spin,[23] Pitchfork,[24] Alternative Press,[25] and Consequence of Sound[26] reported on O'Rourke's campaign by noting his connection with Bixler-Zavala, who had by then become a notable figure in rock music. The news service Reuters described O'Rourke as an "ex-punk rocker" in a headline and detailed his time with Foss.[27] By March 2018, Dan Solomon of Texas Monthly remarked that O'Rourke "seemingly can't escape a single profile without the words 'punk rock Democrat' appearing in the headline".[28]

O'Rourke's campaign pledged not to accept PAC contributions in his Senate campaign, a move he said was partially influenced by the DIY ethic of Dischord Records.[29][30] He told Vox:

"When you're putting out your own records and booking your own tours and writing your own songs, you get to control what you say. The campaign is the same thing."[29]

O'Rourke often highlighted his punk days with Foss in interviews.[31] Political observers and journalists commented that O'Rourke's punk past became an important element of his image and political outlook.[32][33][34][35][36][37] In an op-ed for the New York Times, Mimi Swartz said the fact that O'Rourke "once played in a punk band called Foss" boosted his appeal with millennials.[38]

O'Rourke's former Foss bandmates supported his campaign. Stevens played with his band 83 Skiddoo for an O'Rourke fundraiser in Springfield, Missouri.[39] Bixler-Zavala expressed his support for O'Rourke several times and, after O'Rourke lost the election, tweeted "I can only hope you run for president".[40]

O'Rourke—whose full legal name is Robert Francis O'Rourke, and who is not Hispanic or Latino—has been accused of adopting the Spanish nickname "Beto" to pander to Hispanic and Latino voters. ("Beto" is a diminutive of Spanish first names that end in "-berto" such as Alberto, Roberto, etc.) However, O'Rourke went by the nickname well before he planned a political career—as early as elementary school—and his supporters have pointed to the credits for Foss's recordings, for which he used the name "Beto" rather than "Robert", as further evidence that he had adopted the nickname before he had political aspirations.[41]

Texas GOP tweet[edit]

On August 28, 2018, after O'Rourke had declined a debate against the incumbent Ted Cruz, the Republican Party of Texas's Twitter account tweeted "Maybe Beto can't debate Ted Cruz because he already had plans", attaching the cover of Foss's record The El Paso Pussycats with the caption "Sorry, can't debate. We have a gig." Though the tweet was intended to mock O'Rourke, it was widely perceived as backfiring, inadvertently making the candidate look attractive and appealing.[1][42][43][44][45][46][47][48][49][50] Madeleine Aggeler of New York magazine's The Cut said the tweet had "only served to make O'Rourke look even hotter and cooler",[42] while Kevin Diaz of the Houston Chronicle said the photo, meant to "embarrass" O'Rourke, had actually "somewhat bolster[ed] his skateboarding hip quotient".[43] At Rolling Stone, Ryan Reed described the social media reaction:

"It was obviously meant to be a way to detract from the politician's bona fides, especially because he's shown wearing a dress. Rather than detract, it only proved to many of those who were feeling Betomania how cool their candidate was."[44]

The Texas GOP account responded to the backlash with another tweet, which read: "Based on the reaction to our tweets we can confirm that Beto is in fact going to receive 100% of the vote from Buzzfeed [sic] contributors, out of state liberals, and people who use the word 'rad.' We feel very owned :'(."[45] Others had taken the Texas GOP tweet's message as intended: Jeff Roe, a Republican political consultant, tweeted to express his distaste and amusement to see O'Rourke crossdressing, comparing the photo to Bill Clinton's saxophone performance on The Arsenio Hall Show.[1] Columnist Paul Waldman cited the tweet, and the various reactions to it, as a quintessential example of post-1960s American culture war.[10] In response to the Texas GOP tweet, O'Rourke supporters posted a high school photo of Cruz dressed as a mime, performing in the role of Adam for a biblical play based on the Book of Genesis. Like the photo of Foss, the photo of Cruz as a mime also went viral.[45][51]

Personnel[edit]

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

  • Fewel Street (1995)

EPs[edit]

  • The El Paso Pussycats (1993)
  • Foss (1993)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Stanley-Becker, Isaac (August 30, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke's rock-star status is cemented by Texas GOP, handing Dems an icon they desperately need". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  2. ^ Flegenheimer, Matt (February 6, 2019). "Beto O'Rourke Was Once Adrift in New York City. Now He's Searching Again". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 6, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c Hooks, Christopher (October 3, 2017). "Beto Testing". The Texas Observer. Archived from the original on February 4, 2019. Retrieved February 8, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e Stuart, Tessa (August 30, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke Shares the Story of His Old Band, Foss — and a Single". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on October 3, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d Cush, Andy (October 4, 2017). "A Chat With Beto O'Rourke, the Ex-Punk Bassist Running for Ted Cruz's Senate Seat". Spin. Archived from the original on November 30, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d Terris, Ben (February 21, 2017). "Beto O'Rourke is a Mexico-loving liberal in Texas. Can he really beat Ted Cruz?". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e Grubbs, Eric (August 31, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke's Former Bandmate Calls O'Rourke 'A Cool Motherfucker'". Dallas Observer. Archived from the original on September 1, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  8. ^ Grubbs, Eric (June 5, 2017). "At the Drive-In's Frontman Opens Up About His Former Mentor, U.S. Senate Candidate Beto O'Rourke". Dallas Observer. Archived from the original on November 30, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  9. ^ a b Lambrecht, Bill (March 15, 2017). "Border congressman on verge of U.S. Senate run". San Antonio Express-News. Hearst Communications. Archived from the original on February 8, 2019. Retrieved February 8, 2019.
  10. ^ a b Waldman, Paul (August 31, 2018). "Photo of young Beto O'Rourke activates the never-ending culture wars [Opinion]". Houston Chronicle (syndicated from The Washington Post). Hearst Communications. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  11. ^ a b c d Sanders, Sam (February 6, 2018). "Congressman Beto O'Rourke [transcript]". It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders (Podcast). National Public Radio. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  12. ^ a b c Cepeda, Eduardo (August 31, 2018). "What It Was Like to Be in a Punk Band With Beto O'Rourke, According to Cedric Bixler-Zavala". Remezcla. Archived from the original on November 25, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  13. ^ Benson, Eric (January 2018). "Does Beto O'Rourke Stand a Chance Against Ted Cruz?". Texas Monthly. Archived from the original on November 21, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Miller, Matt (August 29, 2018). "I Would Absolutely Mosh for Beto O'Rourke's Old Punk Band". Esquire. Archived from the original on January 28, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  15. ^ Adams, Matthew (August 31, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke faces new questions about 1998 DWI arrest, and his punk rock phase". Dallas News. A. H. Belo Corporation. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  16. ^ a b Rojas, Warren (June 5, 2012). "From Rock God to Aspiring Lawmaker". Roll Call. Archived from the original on November 14, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  17. ^ Conde, Chris (April 27, 2017). "Beto O'Rourke, the Guy Who Wants to Unseat Ted Cruz, Actually Had a Pretty Awesome Band in the '90s". San Antonio Current. Archived from the original on August 6, 2017. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  18. ^ Roffman, Michael (August 30, 2018). "Ted Cruz kryptonite Beto O'Rourke shares old song featuring Cedric Bixler-Zavala: Stream". Consequence of Sound. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  19. ^ Arcand, Rob (August 30, 2018). "Hear Beto O'Rourke's 1993 Single with At The Drive-In's Cedric Bixler-Zavala". Spin. Archived from the original on November 21, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  20. ^ Murphy, Tim (January 23, 2019). "Here's Video of Beto O'Rourke Singing 'Blitzkrieg Bop' in a Sheep Mask and Onesie". Mother Jones. Archived from the original on February 3, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  21. ^ Murphy, Tim (January 28, 2019). "The Inside Story of Beto O'Rourke's Short-Lived Alt-Weekly". Mother Jones. Archived from the original on February 11, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  22. ^ Lambert, Dan (March 7, 2007). "Top 10: Beto O'Rourke". What's Up. El Paso Inc. Archived from the original on February 12, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  23. ^ Gordon, Jeremy (March 31, 2017). "Former Bandmate of At the Drive-In's Cedric Bixler-Zavala Challenging Ted Cruz for Texas Senate Seat". Spin. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  24. ^ Yoo, Noah (March 31, 2017). "Former Bandmate of At the Drive-In's Cedric Bixler-Zavala Challenging Ted Cruz for Texas Senate Seat". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  25. ^ Smith, Lindy (April 1, 2017). "Ex-Rocker Turned Politician Running for Ted Cruz's Senate Seat". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  26. ^ Colburn, Randall (April 1, 2017). "Former bandmate of Cedric Bixler-Zavala looking to take Ted Cruz's senate seat". Consequence of Sound. Archived from the original on April 1, 2017. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  27. ^ Herskovitz, Jon (March 31, 2017). "Ex-punk rocker challenges Ted Cruz for Senate". Reuters. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  28. ^ Solomon, Dan (March 10, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke's Campaign Strategy Isn't Changing". Texas Monthly. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  29. ^ a b Stein, Jeff (October 9, 2017). "'Sometimes a Hail Mary works': meet the Democrat trying to beat Ted Cruz in Texas". Vox. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  30. ^ Kofler, Shelley (September 27, 2017). "Beto O'Rourke Draws on Punk Rock Background in His Uphill Senate Campaign". Texas Standard. Moody College of Communication at the University of Texas at Austin. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  31. ^ Bailey, Holly (August 18, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke, on a 'suicide mission' against Ted Cruz, is having the time of his life—and might even come out of it alive". Yahoo! News. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  32. ^ Fernandez, Manny (November 26, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke Says He Isn't Ruling Out 2020 Presidential Bid". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 12, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019. Mr. O'Rourke stood out in the 2018 midterm campaign as an unusually charismatic figure and speaker—a former punk rock bassist who became a businessman and City Council member before entering Congress.
  33. ^ Shaw, Adam (December 15, 2018). "Biden advisers float Beto O'Rourke as possible 2020 running mate: report". Fox News. Archived from the original on January 26, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019. Last month, O'Rourke (whose birth name is Robert Francis) lost his bid to unseat Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, but nonetheless became a national Democratic figure who managed to pull in more than $80 million in donations—and was the subject of multiple media profiles that zeroed in on his skateboarding and punk rock background.
  34. ^ Rice, Andrew (November 7, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke and the Limits of Charisma". New York. Archived from the original on January 7, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019. O'Rourke, a former musician, started the campaign talking about his 'punk rock' campaign philosophy, vowing to refuse corporate donations and touring Texas by van, as likely to appear at a honky-tonk bar as the Rotary Club. By the end, he was playing arena shows ... In politics, any mildly compelling candidate is apt to be called a 'rock star,' but O'Rourke actually performed like one.
  35. ^ Svitek, Patrick (January 25, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke ran his 2018 campaign on his own terms. He's looking at 2020 the same way". The Texas Tribune. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019. But O'Rourke, in many ways, is following the playbook — or lack thereof — of his freewheeling Senate race, when he eschewed political norms for a do-it-yourself attitude inspired by his past campaigns and even earlier punk rock days. ... It was a style that led to a closer-than-expected loss to U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz...
  36. ^ Manrique, Jenny (October 29, 2018). "Dallas: Así son los últimos días de campaña de Beto O'Rourke" ["Dallas: These are the last days of Beto O'Rourke's campaign"]. Al Día (in Spanish). Archived from the original on November 7, 2018. Retrieved February 8, 2019. Sus facciones no disfrazan sus 46 años ... pero aún así O'Rourke tiene un aspecto juvenil que recuerda sus inicios como cantante en su banda de punk Foss, en sus años de preparatoria en El Paso. [Translation: 'His features do not disguise his 46 years ... but still O'Rourke has a youthful appearance that recalls his beginnings as a singer in his punk band Foss in his El Paso high school days.']
  37. ^ Zurcher, Anthony (April 4, 2018). "The place that tells you everything about US politics". BBC News. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved February 8, 2019. O'Rourke himself is a former punk rocker who cut a few albums and toured the US as the bass guitarist in the band Foss. He's still got a bit of that rocker edge, sprinkling some choice obscenities into his speeches and even media interviews.
  38. ^ Swartz, Mimi (May 19, 2017). "Opinion: Why Texas Democrats Are Betting on Beto O'Rourke". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 20, 2017. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  39. ^ Holman, Gregory J. (October 11, 2018). "Springfield friends of Beto O'Rourke are doing a fundraiser for Texas pol's Senate run". Springfield News-Leader. Gannett. Archived from the original on January 12, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  40. ^ Colburn, Randall (November 7, 2018). "Cedric Bixler-Zavala praises old bandmate Beto O'Rourke: 'I can only hope you run for president'". Consequence of Sound. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  41. ^ Garcia, Gilbert (August 31, 2018). "Why the GOP is obsessed with O'Rourke's nickname". San Antonio Express-News. Hearst Communications. Archived from the original on November 25, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  42. ^ a b Aggeler, Madeleine (January 23, 2019). "Of Course Beto O'Rourke's Band Was Called Fragile Gang". The Cut. New York Media, LLC. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  43. ^ a b Diaz, Kevin (October 10, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke's ties to his wealthy family draw scrutiny, and attack ads, in US Senate race". Houston Chronicle. Hearst Corporation. Archived from the original on February 3, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  44. ^ a b Reed, Ryan (November 7, 2018). "At the Drive-In's Cedric Bixler-Zavala to Beto O'Rourke: 'I Can Only Hope You Run for President'". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  45. ^ a b c Golshan, Tara (August 29, 2018). "Texas Republicans are trying to use Beto's punk rock days against him". Vox. Archived from the original on November 22, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  46. ^ O'Neil, Luke (August 30, 2018). "'A cool dude': Republican bid to insult Beto O'Rourke on Twitter backfires". The Guardian. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  47. ^ Willis, Jay (August 29, 2018). "Texas Republican Party Accidentally Creates Killer Campaign Ad for Beto O'Rourke". GQ. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  48. ^ Malone, Clare (September 20, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke Is Crafting His Own Mythology". FiveThirtyEight. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019. GOP attacks against him for ... his youthful embrace of the punk aesthetic have backfired among a younger, online set. Twitter users cooed that ... the floral dress he was ironically(?) rocking in a band photo suited him.
  49. ^ Serota, Maggie (August 29, 2018). "Texas GOP: Check Out These Pics of Beto O'Rourke Looking Hot and Cool". Spin. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  50. ^ Kelly, Kim (August 30, 2018). "Hey Right-Wing Jagoffs, Being a Punk Doesn't Make You a Bad Politician". Noisey. Vice Media. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  51. ^ Mazza, Ed (August 30, 2018). "GOP's Meme War Attempt Backfires as Old Ted Cruz Mime Pic Goes Viral". HuffPost. Archived from the original on December 2, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2019.

External links[edit]