Fotografiska

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Fotografiska 2010a.jpg

Fotografiska (The Swedish Museum of Photography) is a centre for contemporary photography in Stockholm, Sweden that opened on 21 May 2010.

Despite its name, it is not a museum because it has no collections, does not conduct research and is for-profit.[1] It is not a member of either Swedish ICOM[2] or Riksförbundet Sveriges museer.[3]

Details[edit]

Fotografiska has 5500 m2 of exhibition spaces,[citation needed] an academy, bistro, café, bar, conference rooms, museum shop, gallery, and event spaces.

Fotografiska is housed at Stadsgården, in a former customs house[4] in the Art Nouveau style[citation needed] dating from 1906. Designed by Ferdinand Boberg, the building is listed as of cultural interest. The original brick facade is intact, while the interiors have been renovated to house the centre. The city of Stockholm has funded the 250 million SEK restoration costs.[citation needed]

Exhibitions[edit]

  • Annie Leibovitz, A Photographer's Life, May 21 – September 19, 2010[4]
  • Lennart Nilsson, A Child is Born, May 21 – September 5, 2010.
  • Joel-Peter Witkin, Bodies, May 21 – August 22, 2010.
  • Vee Speers, The Birthday Party, May 21 – September 5, 2010.[5]
  • Anders Petersen, From Back Home, June 10 – September 5, 2010.
  • Sandy Skoglund, The Artificial Mirror, September 10 – November 6, 2010.
  • Pieter ten Hoopen, Stockholm, September 10 – November 28, 2010.[6]
  • Fashion!, September 24, 2010 – January 9, 2011.[7]
  • Lars Tunbjörk, Wunder-baum, September 24 – November 8, 2010.
  • Hanna Ljung, How to Civilize a War, November 9 – December 7, 2010.
  • Gus Van Sant, One Step Big Shot, November 9 – December 5, 2010.
  • Nils Petter Löfstedt, The Pier, December 9, 2010 – January 9, 2011.
  • Nils Olof Hedenskog & Joakim Brolin, Creeping in Circles, January 14 – March 3, 2011.
  • Jean-Marie Simon, Guatemala. Eternal Spring - Eternal Tyranny, February 10 – March 6, 2011.
  • Christopher Makos, Lady Warhol, December 9, 2010 – March 20, 2011.
  • Sarah Moon, 12345, January 14 – April 17, 2011.[8]
  • Jonathan Torgovnik, Intended Consequences, March 8 – May 1, 2011.
  • VII Photo Agency, Starved for Attention, May 4–29, 2011
  • Albert Watson, Retrospective, March 25 – June 12, 2011.
  • Edward Burtynsky, Burtynsky/Oil, April 22 – June 26, 2011.[9]
  • Eleanor Coppola, Circle of Memory, June 18 – August 21, 2011
  • Jacob Felländer, I Want to Live Close to You, May 6 – August 28, 2011
  • Jacqueline Hellmann, The Unbearable Lightness of Being, May 31 – August 21, 2011
  • Liu Bolin, The Invisible Man, July 2 – September 18, 2011
  • Peter Farago & Ingela Klemetz-Farago, Northern Women in Chanel, July 1 – September 18, 2011
  • Robert Mapplethorpe, Retrospective, June 17 – October 3, 2011
  • Klara Källström, Black Drop Island, September 2 – October 9, 2011
  • Aichi Hirano, ROLLS Tohoku March 31 – April 3, July 8 – October 9, 2011
  • Guy Bourdin, Nature Magique, November 27 – February 21, 2015

Other[edit]

Earlier museum[edit]

Fotografiska museet (sv), a separate Stockholm museum of photography, operated from 1971 to 1998, when it was integrated into Moderna museet.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sara Kristoffersson in "Kulturnyheterna" (at 2 min 30 sek) 18.10 Sveriges Television den 28 juni 2016.
  2. ^ "Institutionella medlemmar", icomsweden.se. Retrieved 1 July 2016.
  3. ^ "Medlemsförteckning", sverigesmuseer.se. Retrieved 1 July 2016.
  4. ^ a b "New Stockholm photography museum opens with Leibovitz show", The Independent, 4 May 2010.
  5. ^ "Vee Speers", Fotografiska.
  6. ^ "Pieter ten Hoopen", Fotografiska.
  7. ^ "[1]", Fotografiska. Archived March 28, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ "Sarah Moon", Fotografiska.
  9. ^ "Edward Burtynsky", Fotografiska.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 10°29′57.48″N 104°17′29.40″E / 10.4993000°N 104.2915000°E / 10.4993000; 104.2915000