Fouta towel

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Tunisian fouta

The fouta is a piece of thin patterned cotton or linen fabric used in many Mediterranean countries, originally Tunisian. Among other uses, they were worn, by both men and women, wrapped around the body while at the public baths in 19th-century Syria.[1] In Algeria, conservative women wore the fouta draped over their sarouel garment.[2] Similarly, in some parts of southern Saudi Arabia, men would wear the fouta as a loincloth beneath their thawb robes, or just by itself while relaxing at home.[3]

Foutas are widely used today in the occidental world as Turkish bath towels (hammam towels) or even beach towels.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Alexander Russell (1794). The Natural History of Aleppo and Parts Adjacent ... pp. 379–. Retrieved 3 September 2013. 
  2. ^ Laurence Benaïm (2001). Le Pantalon: Une Histoire en Marche. Vilo International. ISBN 978-2-84576-035-6. Retrieved 3 September 2013. 
  3. ^ Sherifa Zuhur (31 October 2011). Saudi Arabia. ABC-CLIO. pp. 339–. ISBN 978-1-59884-571-6. Retrieved 3 September 2013. 

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