Fox Factory

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Fox Factory Holding Corp.
TypePublic company
FoundedCalifornia, 1977; 45 years ago (1977)[1]
HeadquartersDuluth, Georgia, U.S.
Key people
  • Mike Dennison (CEO)
  • Scott Humphrey (CFO)
  • Chris Tutton (President, Sport Specialty Group)
  • Rich Winters (President, Powered Vehicle Group)[2]
RevenueUS$803 million (2020)[3]
Number of employees
2,600 (2019)
Websiteridefox.com

Fox Factory Holding Corp. is an American company best known for their Fox Racing Shox brand of off-road racing suspension components.[4]

History[edit]

In 1974, Bob Fox ran a small business distributing suspension components for motocross bikes with his brother Geoff. In 1977,[1] the company split into what became Fox Racing (later Fox Head Inc.) under Geoff Fox, and Bob Fox's Fox Racing Shox parts production company, Fox Factory. A holding company, Fox Factory Holding, was established in 1978.[3] Fox Factory produces suspension components for motorcycles, automobiles, all-terrain vehicles, snowmobiles, and mountain bikes.[1]

Fox Factory was acquired by Compass Diversified Holdings, a private equity firm, in 2008.[5] It went public in 2013.[6]

Acquisitions[edit]

From 2014 through 2021, Fox Factory acquired several groups spanning mountain bike, truck suspension, turn-key truck upfitting, performance car suspension, and custom designed adventure van categories.  

Timeline[edit]

2014[edit]

Sport Truck USA, Coldwater, MI [7]

Fox Acquired several brands under the "Sport Truck USA" umbrella, including;

  • BDS Suspension: Premium suspension kits
  • Zone Offroad: Entry-level suspension kits
  • JKS Manufacturing: Jeep specific suspension kits

Race Face, Vancouver, B.C.[8]

Manufactures and distributes high performance cycling components, apparel, and protection.

Easton[9]

Manufactures and distributes bike components and apparel.

2015[edit]

Marzocchi (Bicycles)[10]

Fox acquired certain assets of Marzocchi dedicated to mountain bike suspension.

2017[edit]

Tuscany Motors, Elkhart, IN[11]

Vehicle upfitter focused on full-size trucks on Ford, Ram, and Chevrolet platforms.

2019[edit]

RideTech, Jasper, IN[12]

Manufacturer of traditional, coilover, and air suspension systems for muscle cars, trucks, and hot rods.

2020[edit]

SCA Performance, Trussville, AL[13]

Vehicle upfitter focused on full-size trucks on the Chevrolet, Ford, and RAM platforms. Brands brought to market under the SCA Performance umbrella include Black Widow, Rocky Ridge Trucks, and Rocky Mountain Truckworks.

2021[edit]

Outside Van, Portland OR[14]

Custom converter of adventure vans on the Mercedes Sprinter platform.

Products[edit]

Mountain Bike Suspensions[edit]

Merida Big Seven mountain bike with Fox front suspension

In 2016, sales of mountain bike related equipment (primarily suspension products) accounted for 56% of the company's total revenue.[3]

Forks[edit]

As of 2016, all available in 26", 27.5", & 29" wheel sizes (except where noted) and tapered steerer tubes, with straight 1-1/8" tubes on select models. Talas springs are externally adjustable down by 20-30mm.

(stanchion size in mm, air spring type, travel range in mm)[15]

Cross Country[edit]
  • 32 Float 100-150
  • 32 Talas 120-150 (discontinued)

(1-1/8" steerer available)

Trail[edit]
  • 34 Float 120-150
  • 34 Talas 140-150 (discontinued)

(27.5"+ replaces 26" wheel option)

All Mountain[edit]
  • 36 factory (grip2 and fit 4 dampers) 150-160 mm of travel
  • 36 performance elite (grip, grip 2, and fit 4 dampers) 150-160 mm of travel
  • 36e factory (ebike ready) (grip2 damper) 140 and 160 mm of travel
  • 36e performance elite (ebike ready) (grip and grip2 dampers) 160 mm of travel
  • 36 Talas 150-180 (discontinued)

(1-1/8" steerer available)

Dirt Jump[edit]
  • 32 831 100 (discontinued)

(26" wheel only, 1-1/8" steerer available)

Downhill[edit]
  • 40 Float 203, for wheels: 27.5” & 29” (called the "40", for a short period the 29” variant was called a “49” but was latter reverted back to “40” to avoid confusion).

( 1-1/8" steerer available)

  • 40 Van (coil spring)(discontinued)

Shocks[edit]

Air Spring[edit]
  • Float [DPS]
  • Float X2
  • Float DPX2
  • Float x
Coil Spring[edit]
  • DHX2
  • DHX

Off-Road Division[edit]

In 2014 Fox introduced the Performance Series line of Off-Road shocks and rebranded their existing shocks as Factory Series.[16] The differences between the two lines of shocks are extensive, nearly every part has been redesigned.

Air Bump Product Lines:

  • 2.0 Factory Series Pinch Mount Air Bump
  • 2.5 Factory Series Stud Mount Air Bump
  • 2.5 Factory Series Pinch Mount Air Bump

Air Shock Product Lines:

  • 2.0 Factory Series Air Shock
  • 2.5 Factory Series Air Shock

Bypass Product Lines:

  • 2.0 Factory Series Bypass
  • 2.5 Factory Series Bypass
  • 3.0 Factory Series Bypass
  • 3.5 Factory Series Bypass
  • 4.0 Factory Series Bypass
  • 4.4 Factory Series Bypass

Coilover Product Lines:

  • 2.0 Factory Series Coilover
  • 2.5 Factory Series Coilover
  • 2.5 Performance Series Coilover
  • 3.0 Factory Series Coilover

Smoothie Product Lines:

  • 2.0 Factory Series Smoothie
  • 2.5 Factory Series Smoothie
  • 2.5 Performance Series Smoothie
  • 3.0 Factory Series Smoothie

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The History of Fox Air Shotcks" (PDF). Moto Cross History Museum. p. 2. Retrieved May 20, 2018.
  2. ^ "Fox Racing Shox - Management". www.ridefox.com. Fox Factory. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  3. ^ a b c "Fox Factory Holding Corp. -". SEC Edgar. SEC.gov.
  4. ^ Fox Racing [1] Fox Racing Shocks - Redefining Limits retrieved 10/2/2013
  5. ^ http://reviews.mtbr.com/fox-racing-shox-announces-financial-partnership-with-compass-diversified-holdings
  6. ^ Fox raises $128M in public debut, ends day up 24%
  7. ^ Reed, Carter (2014-04-02). "Sport Truck USA Acquired by Fox Factory Holding Company". Sport Truck USA | a Division of Fox Factory Inc. (in American English). Retrieved 2021-09-22.
  8. ^ "Fox acquires Raceface and Easton". BIKE Magazine (in American English). 2014-12-05. Retrieved 2021-09-22.
  9. ^ "Fox acquires Raceface and Easton". BIKE Magazine (in American English). 2014-12-05. Retrieved 2021-09-22.
  10. ^ "Fox Racing Shox Acquires Marzocchi". Pinkbike. 2015-10-19. Retrieved 2021-09-22.
  11. ^ "Fox Factory buys majority share in Tuscany Motor Company". Bicycle Retailer and Industry News. Retrieved 2021-09-22.
  12. ^ "Ridetech Acquired by Fox Factory Holding Corp. (FOXF)". Ridetech (in American English). 2019-05-07. Retrieved 2021-09-22.
  13. ^ Staff, THE SHOP. "Fox Factory Agrees to SCA Performance Acquisition". THE SHOP Magazine (in American English). Retrieved 2021-09-22.
  14. ^ Aug 5, SGB Media |; Outdoor, 2021 |; Updates, S. G. B.; Update (2021-08-05). "Fox Factory's Sales Vault 79 Percent | SGB Media Online". sgbonline.com. Retrieved 2021-09-22.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  15. ^ http://www.ridefox.com/2016/filter.php?m=bike&t=forks&ref=topnav#configurator
  16. ^ "Fox 2.5 Performance Series vs Factory Series | AccuTune". AccuTune Off-Road (in American English). Retrieved 2015-10-21.

External links[edit]