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For other uses of the word Foxhound, see Foxhound (disambiguation).

A foxhound is a type of large hunting hound bred for strong hunting instincts, great energy, and, like all scent hounds, a keen sense of smell.[citation needed] In fox hunting, the foxhound's namesake, packs of foxhounds track quarry, followed—usually on horseback—by the hunters, sometimes for several miles at a stretch; moreover, foxhounds also sometimes guard sheep and houses.

There are different breeds of foxhound, each often called simply Foxhound in their native countries:

The American Masters of Foxhounds Association recognizes these breeds of foxhounds: American, Penn-Marydel, English, and Crossbred foxhounds.[1]


In 2005, the American Kennel Club reported that the English and American Foxhounds were their least and fourth least registered breeds in North America with 22 and 44 registrations, respectively; the top registered breed, the Labrador Retriever, had 137,867 registrations during the same year.[2]

Notable foxhounds[edit]

  • Old Drum - said to have been the inspiration for the phrase "Man's Best Friend" which arose from an 1870 court case regarding him.[3][4][5]
  • Mountain and Muse - In 1814 the Duke of Leeds gave two Irish foxhounds, Mountain and Muse, to a visiting guest, Bolton Jackson. This famous pair of hounds changed hands several times before going to Charles Carroll at his Homewood estate. Descendants of Mountain and Muse still hunt territories in Maryland that were once hunted by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Charles Carroll and the Marquis de Lafayette.[6]
  • Colonel - In 2011 Baron von Pfetten's Colonel was Champion of the World Dog Show in Paris and was the first ever English foxhound invited to compete in the final Champion of Champions competition in Bruxelles that same year.[7]

See also[edit]


External links[edit]