Fraenkel Gallery

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Fraenkel Gallery
Fraenkel Gallery logo.gif
Established11 September 1979 (1979-09-11)[1]
Location49 Geary Street, 4th Floor, San Francisco, CA 94108
Coordinates37°47′17″N 122°24′15″W / 37.788172°N 122.404278°W / 37.788172; -122.404278
FounderJeffrey Fraenkel
DirectorAmy Whiteside, Daphne Palmer, Delaney Kennedy
PresidentFrish Brandt
OwnerJeffrey Fraenkel, Frish Brandt
Public transit accessBay Area Rapid Transit Montgomery Street Station
Nearest car parkFifth & Mission Yerba Buena Garage and Ampco System Parking
Websitefraenkelgallery.com

Fraenkel Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in San Francisco[2][3] founded by Jeffrey Fraenkel in 1979. Frish Brandt, president of the gallery, joined in 1985.

Fraenkel Gallery has presented more than 350 exhibitions, with a focus on photography and its relation to other arts including painting, drawing, sculpture, and video. The gallery’s mission is to expand the conversation around photography by bringing together work by artists across all media. Fraenkel Gallery’s exhibitions have spanned photography's history while exploring the medium’s role in the evolution of art, highlighting links between early photographic pioneers and multi-disciplinary artists of today. The gallery works to build personal connections in diverse arts communities, and emphasizes its commitment to the pleasures and rewards of viewing art in person.[4]The gallery maintains a robust publishing program, producing more than 66 books and a wide range of posters to date, including titles that accompany specific exhibitions and coincide with anniversaries.[5]

History[edit]

Jeffrey Fraenkel opened Fraenkel Gallery on 11 September 1979 at 55 Grant Avenue, San Francisco. Frish Brandt joined Fraenkel Gallery in 1985, and became a partner in 1989.[4][6] In 2015, Brandt was named president of the gallery.

Fraenkel Gallery’s inaugural exhibition featured 19th-century photographs of California by Carleton Watkins. In the gallery’s first decade, it brought new attention to under-recognized photographs by seldom-exhibited 19th-century artists including Watkins, Timothy O’Sullivan, Anna Atkins, and Eadweard Muybridge. Fraenkel Gallery’s second exhibition featured Lee Friedlander, and the gallery soon began showing work by other significant 20th-century artists, including Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Helen Levitt, Diane Arbus, Robert Adams, Garry Winogrand, and Bruce Conner.[7]

Two years after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, Fraenkel Gallery moved to a larger space at 49 Geary Street, one block from their first location.[4][8][9] The gallery expanded the range of artworks and media featured in exhibitions and books, and presented solo shows by artists including Nan Goldin, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Sophie Calle, Richard Avedon, Sol LeWitt, Gilbert & George, Jay DeFeo, and Bernd and Hilla Becher, as well as group shows encompassing sculpture, drawing, and mixed media.

In the 2000s, Fraenkel Gallery began to feature more artists working outside of photography, and exhibitions during this decade included Edward Hopper & Company,[10] Nothing and Everything: Painting, Photography, Drawing & Sculpture 1896–2006, and Not Exactly Photographs.[11] The gallery also added Katy Grannan,[12] Peter Hujar, Christian Marclay, and Ralph Eugene Meatyard to its roster, and began participating in international art fairs including Art Basel and Paris Photo.[7]

In the 2010s, Fraenkel Gallery exhibited an increasingly wider swath of multi-disciplinary work, as well as video, sculpture, paintings, film posters, and record albums. The gallery added younger artists to its roster, including Alec Soth, Richard T. Walker, Wardell Milan, Elisheva Biernoff, and Richard Learoyd, as well as those working in a range of media, such as Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller and Mel Bochner. The satellite space FraenkelLAB, at 1632 Market Street in San Francisco, ran from 2016 through 2017 with a diverse and experimental program. The inaugural exhibition, Home Improvements,[13] was curated by John Waters, and subsequent exhibitions included the work of Richard T. Waker,[14] David Benjamin Sherry,[15]  Sophie Calle, Katy Grannan, Alec Soth and others.  

Artists or their estates represented by Fraenkel Gallery[edit]

[16]

Fraenkel Gallery has in the past represented the estate of Ansel Adams.[9]

Publications (selected)[edit]


  • Photography in Spain in the Nineteenth Century. Text by Lee Fontanella. San Francisco and London: Fraenkel and Delahunty Gallery, 1983
  • The Insistent Object: Photographs of 1845-1986. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1987
  • Carleton E. Watkins: Photographs 1861-1874.  San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1989
  • The Kiss of Apollo: Photography and Sculpture—1845 to the Present. Essay by Eugenia Parry Janis. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1991
  • Bill Dane’s History of the Universe. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1992
  • Henry Wessel: House Pictures. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1992
  • Under the Sun: Photographs by Christopher Bucklow, Susan Derges, Garry Fabian-Miller, and Adam Fuss. Essay by David Alan Melor. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1996
  • Open Secrets: Seventy Pictures on Paper 1815 to the Present. San Francisco: Fraenkel; Matthew Marks Gallery, 1997 (ISBN 978-1881337034)
  • Dust Breeding: Photographs, Sculpture & Film. Introduction by Steve Wolfe. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1998
  • David Smith: Photographs 1931-1965. Introduction by Rosalind E. Krauss, essay by Joan Pachner. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Matthew Marks, 1998
  • Lee Friedlander: Self Portrait. Afterword by John Szarkowski. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and D.A.P., 1998
  • San Francisco Album: George Robinson Fardon—Photographs 1854-1856. Essays by Peter E. Palmquist, Rodger C. Birt, and Joan M. Schwartz. Catalogue Raisonné by Marvin Nathan. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Hans P. Kraus, Jr., 1999
  • The Man in the Crowd. The Uneasy Streets of Garry Winogrand. Introduction by Fran Lebowitz, essay by Ben Lifson. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and D.A.P., 1999
  • Susan Derges: Woman Thinking River. Introduction by Mark Haworth-Booth, essay by Charlotte Cotton. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Danziger, 1999
  • California: Views by Robert Adams of the Los Angeles Basin, 1978-1983. Afterword by Robert Hass. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Matthew Marks, 2000
  • Lee Friedlander. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2000
  • Lee Friedlander: The Little Screens. Introduction by Walker Evans. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2001
  • Richard Avedon: Made in France. Essay by Judith Thurman. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2001
  • Lee Friedlander: Kitaj. Introduction by Maria Friedlander, with postscript by R.B. Kitaj. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2002
  • Diane Arbus: The Libraries. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2004
  • Lee Friedlander: Family. Introduction by Maria Friedlander. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2004
  • Lee Friedlander: Sticks and Stones. Essay by James Enyeart. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and D.A.P., 2004
  • Peter Hujar: Night. Essay by Bob Nickas. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Matthew Marks, 2005
  • Robert Adams: Turning Back. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Matthew Marks, 2005
  • Lee Friedlander: Apples and Olives. San Francisco and Göteborg: Fraenkel and Hasselblad Center, 2005
  • Richard Misrach: Chronologies. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2005
  • Lee Friedlander: Cherry Blossom Time in Japan. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2006
  • Eye of the Beholder: Photographs from the Collection of Richard Avedon. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2006
  • Nothing and Everything. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Peter Freeman, Inc., 2006
  • The Book of Shadows. San Francisco: Fraenkel Gallery, 2007 (ISBN 978-1933045665)
  • Katy Grannan: The Westerners. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel, Greenberg Van Doren Gallery and Salon 94 Freemans, 2007
  • 73 Photographs from David and Mary Robinson at the National Gallery of Art. Essays by David Robinson and Sarah Greenough, with an afterword by Jeffrey Fraenkel. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2007
  • Christian Marclay: Stereo. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2008
  • Edward Hopper & Company, San Francisco: Fraenkel Gallery, 2009 (ISBN 9781881337263)
  • Nicholas Nixon: Live Love Look Last. San Francisco, New York and Göttingen: Fraenkel, Pace/MacGill Gallery and Steidl, 2009
  • Lee Friedlander: America by Car. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and D.A.P., 2010
  • Mel Bochner: Photographs and Not Photographs. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2010
  • Katy Grannan: Boulevard. San Francisco & New York: Fraenkel Gallery & Salon 94, 2011 (ISBN 9781881337294)
  • Lee Friedlander: The New Cars 1964. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2011
  • Richard Learoyd: Presences. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2011
  • Robert Adams: Prairie. Essay by Eric Paddock. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2011
  • Lee Friedlander: Mannequin. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2012
  • Robert Adams: Light Balances & On Any Given Day in Spring. Text by Robert Adams. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Matthew Marks, 2012
  • The Unphotographable. Edited by Jeffrey Fraenkel. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2013. ISBN 978-1881337331
  • Christian Marclay: Things I’ve Heard. Interview with Christian Marclay. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Paula Cooper Gallery, 2013
  • Richard Misrach: 1.21.11 5:40pm. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2013
  • Peter Hujar: Love & Lust. Interview with Fran Lebowitz and essay by Vince Aletti. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2014
  • Katy Grannan: The Ninety Nine and The Nine. San Francisco and New York: Fraenkel and Salon 94, 2014
  • John Gossage: Who Do You Love. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2014
  • Robert Adams: A Road Through Shore Pine. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2014
  • Nicholas Nixon: About Forty Years. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2015
  • Silent Dialogues: Diane Arbus & Howard Nemerov. Text by Alexander Nemerov. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2015
  • Robert Adams: Around the House. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2016
  • Ralph Eugene Meatyard: American Mystic. Text by Alexander Nemerov. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2017
  • Elisheva Biernoff. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2017
  • Robert Adams: Tenancy. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2017
  • Art & Vinyl. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2018
  • Robert Adams: 27 Roads. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2018
  • Lee Friedlander: SIGNS. San Francisco: Fraenkel Gallery, 2019 (ISBN 9781881337485)

Anniversary publications[edit]

  • Seeing Things. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1995. ISBN 978-1881337003. Published to coincide with the gallery's fifteenth anniversary.
  • 20Twenty. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 1999. ISBN 9781881337423. Published to coincide with the gallery's twentieth anniversary.
  • The Eye Club. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2003. ISBN 978-1881337171. Edited by Jeffrey Fraenkel. Text by Jeffrey Fraenkel and Frish Brandt. Published to coincide with the gallery's twenty fifth anniversary.
  • Furthermore. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2009. ISBN 978-1881337270. Published to coincide with the gallery's thirtieth anniversary.
  • The Plot Thickens. San Francisco: Fraenkel, 2014. ISBN 978-1881337393. Edited and with an introduction by Jeffrey Fraenkel. Published to coincide with the gallery's thirty fifth anniversary.
  • Long Story Short, San Francisco, Fraenkel Gallery, 2019 (ISBN 9781881337492). Edited by Jeffrey Fraenkel and Frish Brandt. Published to coincide with the gallery's fortieth anniversary.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Whiting, Sam (29 November 2014). "Picture of success: Gallery owner Jeffrey Fraenkel marks 35 years". San Francisco: San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  2. ^ Stein, Suzanne (3 January 2011). "75 Reasons to Live: Jeffrey Fraenkel on Diane Arbus". San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  3. ^ Conway, Richard (5 February 2013). "The Unphotographable at Fraenkel". San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Whiting, Sam (3 September 1999). "A Photographic Memory / Fraenkel Gallery celebrates 20 years". SFGate.com. San Francisco: San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  5. ^ "Publications". Fraenkel Gallery. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  6. ^ "Frish Brandt Appointed President of Fraenkel Gallery". Fraenkel Gallery. 21 April 2015. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  7. ^ a b "40 Years". Fraenkel Gallery. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  8. ^ Baker, Kenneth (2014-11-30). "The best photo gallery ever, Fraenkel Gallery, turns 35". SFChronicle.com. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  9. ^ a b Baker, Kanneth (25 August 2003). "For 25 years, the Fraenkel Gallery has focused its lens on photography's emergence as an art form. A celebration is developing". SFGate.com. San Francisco: San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  10. ^ Finkel, Jori (2009-02-27). "San Francisco Exhibition Explores Edward Hopper's Influences". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  11. ^ Baker, Kenneth (2003-03-15). "Photography altered art; artists altered photographs". SFGate. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  12. ^ Baker, Kenneth (2015-06-13). "An antidote to irony at Fraenkel Gallery". SFChronicle.com. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  13. ^ "John Waters-curated show shines light on the humdrum". SFChronicle.com. 2016-04-15. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  14. ^ "Richard T. Walker: An Occasionally Related Occurrence 1 & 2". Fraenkel Gallery. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  15. ^ "David Benjamin Sherry". Fraenkel Gallery. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  16. ^ "Artists". Fraenkel Gallery. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  17. ^ Baker, Kanneth (30 November 2014). "The best photo gallery ever, Fraenkel Gallery, turns 35". San Francisco: San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  18. ^ Baker, Kanneth (7 January 2010). "Catching up with Jeffrey Fraenkel". SFGate.com. San Francisco: San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  19. ^ Baker, Kanneth (12 June 2015). "An antidote to irony at Fraenkel Gallery". San Francisco: San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 15 November 2015.

External links[edit]