France women's national rugby union team

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France
UnionFrench Rugby Federation
Head coachAnnick Hayraud
CaptainGaëlle Hermet
First colours
Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current3 (as of 18 April 2022)
Highest2 (2005–2006, 2015–2016)
Lowest6 (2008–2009)
First international
 France 4-0 Netherlands 
(Utrecht, Netherlands 13 April 1982)
Biggest win
 France 99-0 Japan 
(Edinburgh, Scotland 17 April 1994)
Biggest defeat
 New Zealand 109-3 France 
(Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 14 September 1996)
World Cup
Appearances7 (First in 1991)
Best result3rd place, 1991, 1994, 2002, 2006, 2014 and 2017
Top 20 rankings as of 18 April 2022[1]
Rank Change* Team Points
1 Steady  England 096.26
2 Steady  New Zealand 088.58
3 Steady  France 088.43
4 Steady  Canada 088.15
5 Steady  Australia 078.68
6 Steady  United States 076.63
7 Increase1  Ireland 076.00
8 Decrease1  Italy 075.12
9 Steady  Wales 073.63
10 Steady  Scotland 072.72
11 Steady  Spain 072.10
12 Steady  Japan 065.49
13 Steady  South Africa 063.39
14 Steady  Russia 061.10
15 Steady  Samoa 059.72
16 Steady  Kazakhstan 058.45
17 Steady  Netherlands 058.27
18 Steady  Hong Kong 057.89
19 Steady  Sweden 057.73
20 Steady  Germany 057.72
*Change from the previous week

The France women's national rugby union team represents France in women's international rugby union. They played their first international in 1982 against the Netherlands.

History[edit]

Source: "Des Filles en Ovalie", Éditions Atlantica (2005), Written by Jacques Corte / Yaneth Pinilla B. Foreword by Serge Betsen.

There are records of women's rugby being played in France as early as the mid-1890s, and in the 1920s a form of the game called "barette" was very popular, with national championships. However, after the 1930s the game had all but disappeared and was not revived until 1965 when groups of students in Lyon and Toulouse decided to take part in the great charitable campaign against world hunger. Most of them had brothers and friends who played rugby, so they decided to organise a charity game at Bourg-en-Bresse.

So successful was this that a regular series of games began, with clubs being formed as students graduated, initially mainly in the south. In 1969 a national association – the ARF [Women's Rugby Association] – was formed. Despite initial opposition to the game from both the government and the FFR (who briefly banned any FFR officials from officiating at women's games) by 1976 12 clubs were taking part in national competitions.

In 1982, by which time the number of clubs had more than doubled, the ARF signed a memorandum of understanding was agreed with the FFR which finally gave their official backing – and in the same year France took part in the first ever women's rugby international.

Current squad[edit]

On 14 March 2022 France Head Coach Annick Hayraud named a 35-player squad for the 2022 Women's Six Nations Championship.[2][3] On 29 March Céline Ferer, Maïlys Traoré and Safi N'Diaye were all added to the squad to face Ireland.[4]

Player Position Caps Club/Province
Julie Annery Flanker 9 Stade Français Paris
Cyrielle Banet Wing 20 Montpellier RC
Rose Bernadou Prop 6 Montpellier RC
Axelle Berthoumeu Flanker 6 Blagnac Rugby Féminin
Camille Boudaud Centre 12 Stade Toulousain Rugby
Emilie Boulard Fullback 6 RC Chilly Mazarin
Yllana Brosseau Prop 4 Stade Bordelais
Marie-Aurélie Castel Wing 4 Stade Rennais Rugby
Alexandra Chambon Scrumhalf 1 FC Grenoble Amazones
Annaëlle Deshaye Prop 19 Lyon Olympique Universitaire
Coumba Diallo Flanker 17 Stade Français Paris
Célia Domain Prop 4 Blagnac Rugby Féminin
Caroline Drouin Flyhalf 13 Stade Rennais Rugby
Charlotte Escudero Number 8 0 Blagnac Rugby Féminin
Madoussou Fall Lock 11 Stade Bordelais
Manae Feleu Lock 1 FC Grenoble Amazones
Céline Ferer Flanker 28 Stade Toulousain Rugby
Maëlle Filopon Wing 11 Stade Toulousain Rugby
Audrey Forlani Lock 23 Blagnac Rugby Féminin
Emeline Gros Number 8 5 Montpellier RC
Gaëlle Hermet (c) Flanker 33 Stade Toulousain Rugby
Chloé Jacquet Fullback 3 Lyon Olympique Universitaire
Clara Joyeux Prop 25 Blagnac Rugby Féminin
Assia Khalfaoui Prop 0 Stade Bordelais
Coco Lindelauf Prop 3 Blagnac Rugby Féminin
Mélissande Llorens Wing 1 Blagnac Rugby Féminin
Marjorie Mayans Flanker 12 Blagnac Rugby Féminin
Marine Menager Wing 22 Montpellier RC
Romane Menager Flanker 23 Montpellier RC
Léa Murie Wing 5 Stade Toulousain Rugby
Safi N'Diaye Flanker 27 Montpellier RC
Morgane Peyronnet Centre 17 Montpellier RC
Laure Sansus Scrumhalf 17 Stade Toulousain Rugby
Agathe Sochat Hooker 17 Stade Bordelais
Laure Touye Hooker 15 Montpellier RC
Maïlys Traoré Prop 24 Stade Toulousain Rugby
Jessy Trémoulière Fullback 22 ASM Romagnat Rugby Féminin
Gabrielle Vernier Centre 22 Blagnac Rugby Féminin

Previous squads[edit]

Record[edit]

Note: Although the FFR list all of the following as full internationals or "test matches" in their publications (including their website), they do not award caps for all of the games. In particular, no caps have been officially awarded for appearances before 1989 (when the FFR became responsible for women's rugby), and most matches in FIRA tournaments after 2004 are uncapped. As a result, there can be a significant difference between the number of appearances players may have made for France and their official number of caps.

Overall[edit]

(Full internationals only)
Correct as of 21 November 2021

France internationals since 1982
Opponent First played Games played Won Drawn Lost Win rate (%)
 Australia 1998 5 4 0 1 80.00
 Belgium 1988 1 1 0 0 100.00
 Canada 1996 15 8 0 7 53.33
 England 1991 50 14 0 36 28.00
 Germany 1997 1 1 0 0 100.00
 Great Britain 1986 4 3 0 1 75.00
 Ireland 1994 29 25 1 3 86.21
 Italy 1985 23 19 1 3 82.61
 Japan 1988 3 3 0 0 100.00
 Kazakhstan 1998 3 3 0 0 100.00
 Netherlands 1982 12 11 0 1 91.67
 New Zealand 1996 9 4 0 5 44.44
 Scotland 1998 27 23 1 5 85.19
 South Africa 2009 4 3 1 0 75.00
 Spain 1989 19 14 0 5 73.68
 Sweden 1988 4 4 0 0 100.00
 United States 1996 13 10 1 2 76.92
 Wales 1994 27 23 0 4 85.19
Total 1982 246 168 5 73 68.29%

World Cup[edit]

Year Round Position GP W D L PF PA
Wales 1991 Semi-finals Bronze medal icon.svg 3 2 0 1 99 13
Scotland 1994 3rd Place Playoff Bronze medal icon.svg 5 4 0 1 240 26
Netherlands 1998 7th Place Playoff 8th 5 2 0 3 52 68
Spain 2002 3rd Place Playoff Bronze medal icon.svg 4 3 0 1 93 58
Canada 2006 3rd Place Playoff Bronze medal icon.svg 5 3 0 2 102 85
England 2010 3rd Place Playoff 4th 5 3 0 2 70 91
France 2014 3rd Place Playoff Bronze medal icon.svg 5 4 0 1 139 42
Ireland 2017 3rd Place Playoff Bronze medal icon.svg 5 4 0 1 175 62
New Zealand 2021 Qualified
Total 9/9 3rd 37 25 0 12 970 445

Notable players[edit]

Nathalie Amiel was inducted into the IRB Hall of Fame on 17 November 2014.[5][6] She made her international debut at 15 against Great Britain in London in 1986. She went on to win 56 caps for France by the time she retired in 2002.[5] She played at three Women’s Rugby World Cups in 1991, 1994 and 2002.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Women's World Rankings". World Rugby. Retrieved 4 April 2022.
  2. ^ "Le groupe pour le Tournoi des Six Nations". Fédération Française de Rugby (in French). Retrieved 2022-03-14.
  3. ^ "France name squad for TikTok Women's Six Nations". TikTok Women’s Six Nations. 2022-03-14. Retrieved 2022-03-16.
  4. ^ "Le groupe pour l'Irlande". Fédération Française de Rugby (in French). Retrieved 2022-03-31.
  5. ^ a b c World Rugby (18 November 2014). "2014 Inductee: Nathalie Amiel". Retrieved 6 January 2015.
  6. ^ AFP/de (channelnewsasia.com) (18 November 2014). "Rugby: Women enter IRB Hall of Fame for first time". Retrieved 18 November 2014.

External links[edit]