Francis Bickerstaffe-Drew

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The Right Rev. Bickerstaffe-Drew.

Monsignor Francis Browning Bickerstaffe-Drew K.H.S., better known as John Ayscough,[1][2] (11 February 1858 – 3 July 1928) was an English writer[3] and Roman Catholic priest.

Biography[edit]

He was born in Headingley, Leeds, the son of Harry Lloyd Bickerstaffe, a Church of England Clergyman, and Elisabeth Mona Brougham Drew.[4] In 1878, he converted to Catholicism while an undergraduate at Pembroke College, Oxford.[5] Msgr. Drew was ordained as a Catholic priest in 1884 and served as a chaplain in the British army for more than thirty years. He was made a private Chamberlain by Pope Leo XIII in 1891 and by Pius X in 1903, was a member of the Pontifical Chamber of Malta and was a knight of the sacred military Order of the Holy Sepulchre.[6]

Francis Bickerstaffe-Drew died in Salisbury, England.

Honors[edit]

Msgr. Drew held honorary degrees from the University of Notre Dame and Marquette University. In 1901, he received the cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice.

Works[edit]

  • Oremus: or, Little Mildred (1880).
  • Dominus Vobiscum: or, The Sailor Boy (1880).
  • Veni Creator; or, Ulrich's Money (1881).
  • Pater Noster; or, An Orphan Boy (1881).
  • Per Jesum Christum: or, Two Good Fridays (1881).
  • Ave Maria; or, Catesby's Story (1882).
  • Credo; or, Justin's Martyrdom (1882).
  • Ora Pro Nobis (1883).
  • Marotz (1908).
  • Mr. Beke of the Blacks (1908).
  • Dromina (1909).
  • A Roman Tragedy and Others (1909).
  • San Celestino (1909).
  • Outsiders—and In (1910).
  • Mezzogiorno (1911).
  • Hurdcott (1911).
  • Faustula N. A.D. 340 (1912).
  • Gracechurch (1913).
  • Monksbridge (1914).
  • Prodigals and Sons (1914).
  • French Windows (1918).
  • Jacqueline (1918).
  • The Tideway (1918).
  • Fernando (1919).
  • Abbotscourt (1920).
  • First Impressions in America (1921).
  • Discourses and Essays (1922).
  • Mariquita (1922).
  • Pages from the Past (1922).
  • Dobachi (1923).

Selected articles

Short stories

References[edit]

  1. ^ Halkett, Samuel & John Laing (1956). Dictionary of Anonymous and Pseudonymous English Literature. New York: Haskell House Publishers, pp. 135, 169.
  2. ^ Room, Adrian (2010). Dictionary of Pseudonyms: 13,000 Assumed Names and Their Origins. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, Inc., p. 40.
  3. ^ Keller, Leo W. (1920). "John Ayscough, Novelist," The Catholic World, Vol. CXI, pp. 164–173.
  4. ^ Gorman, W. Gordon (1910). Converts to Rome. London: Sands & Co., pp. 23, 33.
  5. ^ "Bickerstaffe-Drew, Francis," New Catholic Dictionary.
  6. ^ "The Rt. Rev. Msgr. Count Francis Bickerstaffe-Drew, LL.D.," The Notre Dame Alumnus, Vol. VII, No. 1, September 1928, p. 16.

Further reading[edit]

  • Adams, J.R. (1922). "The Modern Catholic Novel," The American Catholic Quarterly Review, Vol. XLVII, pp. 130–135.
  • Bickerstaffe-Drew, F. (1919). John Ayscough's Letters to his Mother during 1914, 1915 and 1916. New York: P.J. Kenedy & Sons.
  • Braybrooke, Patrick (1931). "John Ayscough; Priest and Novelist." In: Some Catholic Novelists: Their Art and Outlook. London: Burns, Oats & Washbourne, Ltd.
  • Gerrard, Thomas J. (1911). "The Real Romance of Life," The Catholic World, Vol. XCIII, No. 553, pp. 1–16.
  • Martin, Arthur A. (1915). A Surgeon in Khaki. London: Edward Arnold.

External links[edit]