Francis Dutton

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The Honourable
Francis Dutton
CMG
Francis Dutton.jpg
7th Premier of South Australia
In office
4 July 1863 – 15 July 1863
MonarchVictoria
GovernorSir Dominick Daly
Preceded byGeorge Waterhouse
Succeeded bySir Henry Ayers
ConstituencyLight
In office
22 March 1865 – 20 September 1865
MonarchVictoria
GovernorSir Dominick Daly
Preceded bySir Arthur Blyth
Succeeded bySir Henry Ayers
Personal details
Born18 October 1818
Cuxhaven, Lower Saxony
Died25 January 1877(1877-01-25) (aged 58)
London, United Kingdom

Francis Stacker Dutton CMG (18 October 1818 – 25 January 1877) was the seventh Premier of South Australia, serving twice, firstly in 1863 and again in 1865.[1]

History[edit]

Dutton was born at Cuxhaven, Germany, where his father was British vice-consul, in 1818. He was educated at Hofwyl College, near Bern in Switzerland, and afterwards at the high school at Bremen in Germany. At 17, he went to Brazil as a junior clerk and was there for about five years, in Bahia and Rio de Janeiro.

In 1839, he joined his older brothers Hampden, Pelham and Frederick[2] in Sydney, went overland to Melbourne, and followed mercantile pursuits for about 18 months, He then joined his brother Frederick at Adelaide and in 1842 or early in 1843, discovered copper at Kapunda, 45 miles north of Adelaide. He showed the specimen he had found to Captain Charles Bagot, who produced a similar specimen that his son had found in the same locality. The land was purchased and samples were sent to England, which showed a high percentage of copper. Dutton visited England in 1845 and sold his interest in the mine for a large sum. While in London, he prepared for publication his South Australia and its Mines, a work of 360 pages, a valuable contemporary account of the new colony published in 1846.

Dutton returned to South Australia in 1847 and in 1849, became a member of the Adelaide board of city commissioners. He was elected a member of the Legislative Council for East Adelaide in 1851 and sat until 1857, when he was elected to the House of Assembly as member for City of Adelaide (9 March 1857 to 18 March 1860) and then for Light (19 March 1860 to 22 Apr 1862; and 17 November 1862 to 28 September 1865).[3] He was Commissioner of Crown Lands and Immigration in the Hanson government from 30 September 1857 to 2 June 1859, and was premier from 4 to 15 July 1863.[3] He formed his second cabinet on 22 March 1865 and was premier and commissioner of public works until 20 September of the same year,[3] when he became agent-general in London for South Australia. He was a good linguist, able to speak French, German and Portuguese, and had an excellent knowledge of business which enabled him to carry out his duties with success until his death on 25 January 1877.

Recognition[edit]

Dutton was made a Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (CMG) in 1872.[1]

Dutton's Bluff, later Dutton Bluff, a hill some 66 km north-west of Quorn, was named for him[4] and the Victorian government botanist named Eremophila duttonii in his honour.[5][6]

Family[edit]

Dutton married Caroline MacDermott (ca.1822 – 1 June 1855), a daughter of Marshall MacDermott on 7 November 1849; they had two sons and a daughter:[1]

  • Francis "Frank" MacDermott Dutton (1850 – c. 9 May 1932)[7]
  • Caroline Birch Dutton (15 August 1852 – 1950) married barrister Charles Thomas Mitchell in Norland, Middlesex on 17 August 1878. Her portrait was painted by Carlile Henry Hayes Macartney[8]
  • Sir Frederick Dutton (14 April 1855 – c. 10 October 1930), solicitor of Wilkins, Blyth, Dutton and Hartley, married Beatrice Aimee Bridger MBE (1863 – 1 August 1928) in 1883.[9]

William Hampden Dutton (1805–1849), pastoralist of Anlaby Station and miner at Kapunda, was a brother, as was pastoralist and parliamentarian Frederick Hansborough Dutton (1812–1890).

Note: William Dutton (1811–1878), sometimes referred to as "William Pelham Dutton", ship's captain, whaler and pioneer of Portland, Victoria, was not closely related. Author Geoffrey Dutton, great-grandson of W. H. Dutton, warned against this confusion in his article on F. S. Dutton in the Australian Dictionary of Biography.[1] For his relationship to other people prominent in the history of South Australia see separate article.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Dutton, Geoffrey. "Dutton, Francis Stacker (1818–1877)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  2. ^ "Mr. Franois S. Dutton". Australian Town and Country Journal. Sydney. 10 February 1877. p. 13. Retrieved 25 November 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ a b c "Mr Francis Dutton". Parliament of South Australia.
  4. ^ "Nomenclature of South Australia". The Register. Adelaide. 23 May 1908. p. 10. Retrieved 21 November 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ Chinnock, R.J. (Bob) (2007). Eremophila and allied genera : a monograph of the plant family Myoporaceae (1st ed.). Dural, NSW: Rosenberg. pp. 649–651. ISBN 9781877058165.
  6. ^ Brown, Andrew; Buirchell, Bevan (2011). A field guide to the eremophilas of Western Australia (1st ed.). Hamilton Hill, W.A.: Simon Nevill Publications. p. 91. ISBN 9780980348156.
  7. ^ "Rail Revenue Still Mounting". The Chronicle. Adelaide. 12 May 1932. p. 37. Retrieved 25 November 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Caroine Birch Mitchell nee Dutton". Art UK. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  9. ^ "Death of Sir Frederick Dutton". The Advertiser. Adelaide. 15 October 1930. p. 14. Retrieved 25 November 2015 – via National Library of Australia.

Sources[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Marshall MacDermott
Commissioner of Crown Lands and Immigration
30 Sep 1857 – 2 Jun 1859
Succeeded by
John Neales
Preceded by
Henry Strangways
Commissioner of Crown Lands and Immigration
4 Jul 1863 – 15 Jul 1863
Succeeded by
Lavington Glyde
Preceded by
George Waterhouse
Premier of South Australia
4 Jul 1863 – 15 Jul 1863
Succeeded by
Henry Ayers
Preceded by
Arthur Blyth
Premier of South Australia
22 Mar 1865 – 20 Sep 1865
Preceded by
William Milne
Commissioner of Public Works
22 Mar 1865 – 20 Sep 1865
Succeeded by
Philip Santo
Parliament of South Australia
Preceded by
New district
Member for City of Adelaide
1857–1860
Served alongside: Robert Torrens, Judah Solomon, Richard Hanson, Boyle Finniss, John Neales, William Burford, William Owen
Succeeded by
Matthew Moorhouse
Preceded by
David Shannon
Member for Light
1860–1862
Served alongside: John Bagot
Succeeded by
John Rowe
Preceded by
John Rowe
Member for Light
1862–1865
Served alongside: John Bagot
Succeeded by
John Rounsevell
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Gregory Walters
Agent-General for South Australia
1865–1877
Succeeded by
Arthur Blyth