Francis Murphy (Irish politician)

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Francis Stack Murphy SL (1810? – 1860) was an Irish lawyer, scholar and Member of Parliament.

Life[edit]

Born in Cork, Murphy was the son of the merchant Jeremiah Murphy and the nephew of John Murphy, Bishop of Cork. He was educated at Clongowes Wood College and Trinity College, Dublin; he graduated B.A. in 1829 and M.A. in 1832.

He was called to the bar on 25 January 1833 at Lincoln's Inn.[1] In 1834, he became connected with Fraser's Magazine as an occasional contributor, assisting 'Father Prout' in his famous 'Reliques.' He was an excellent classical scholar, and was responsible for some of Mahony's Greek and Latin verses. Mahony introduces him in his 'Prout Papers' as 'Frank Cresswell of Furnival's Inn.' [2]

In 1841, he ran for election as a Member of Parliament for Cork City, which he won and took office on 5 July. He was made a Serjeant-at-law in February 1842,[3] and resigned as MP in January 1846, before running for office again in 1851 after the resignation of William Trant Fagan. On 1 August 1853, he was made a Commissioner for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors.[4]

He died on 17 June 1860. [2]

References[edit]

Attribution|

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainO'Donoghue, David James (1894). "Murphy, Francis Stack". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 39. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Francis Bernard Beamish
Daniel Callaghan
Member of Parliament for Cork City
1841–1846
With: Daniel Callaghan
Succeeded by
Alexander McCarthy
Daniel Callaghan
Preceded by
William Trant Fagan
James Charles Chatterton
Member of Parliament for Cork City
1851–1853
With: James Charles Chatterton to 1852
William Trant Fagan from 1852
Succeeded by
Francis Bernard Beamish
William Trant Fagan