Francis Scott Key Monument

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Key 5643438604 2072b935c8 o.jpg

The Francis Scott Key Monument is an outdoor sculpture to Francis Scott Key in Baltimore, Maryland.

History[edit]

Charles Marburg gave $25,000 to his brother Theodore Marburg to hire a sculptor to create a monument to Francis Scott Key. The French sculptor Antonin Mercié was selected. Mercié had previously created a bronze equestrian statue of Robert E. Lee in 1890 in Richmond, Virginia.[1]

The sculpture was restored and rededicated on September 11, 1999.[1]

Figure of Columbia with the American Flag

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Coordinates: 39°18′14″N 76°37′34″W / 39.30388°N 76.62605°W / 39.30388; -76.62605 (F.S. Key Monument)

  1. ^ a b "Restored Key Monument Rededicated". Heritage Preservation. Retrieved 2011-04-26. Charles Marburg gave $25,000 to his brother Theodore to commission a monument to his favorite poet, Francis Scott Key. The French sculptor Marius Jean Antonin Mercie was the selected artist. At the time, Mercié was known for European sculptures as well as the Robert E. Lee (1890) equestrian bronze in Richmond, Virginia, and collaboration on General Lafayette (1891) in the District of Columbia.