Francis Scott Street

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Francis Scott Street (1831-1883) obituary in the Brooklyn Eagle on April 16, 1883

Francis Scott Street (October 20, 1831 – April 15, 1883), with partner Francis Shubael Smith were the owners of Street & Smith publishing company in New York City.

New York Dispatch[edit]

He was born in New York City in 1831, but moved to New Brunswick, New Jersey in 1844 to work for a grocer. In 1849 he went to work as a bookkeeper for Amos J. Williamson, the publisher of the New York Dispatch, a weekly newspaper. Street teamed up with Francis Shubael Smith, then an editor at the Dispatch in 1855 when they bought a failing magazine together. They then bought the New York Dispatch Weekly in 1858 for $40,000. The sum was to be paid to Williamson over 5 years. Street and Smith were able to increase circulation, and at the time it became one of the most widely circulated New York City weekly newspapers.

Marriage[edit]

Francis married Susan E. Potts (1836-1883), daughter of Abram and Elizabeth Potts, around 1858 and they lived in Greenpoint in Brooklyn in 1860. Susan died on June 5, 1883, just 8 weeks after her husband died. Together they had two sons and two daughters.

Francis had a cousin: Jacob Street (c1790-?) from Pitminster, England who moved to Newfoundland, Canada around 1820. Jacob left Canada to travel back to England in 1858-1860, and then he went to New York City where he stayed with his cousin Francis Scott Street.

Death[edit]

He was suffering from liver disease for several years but died from a cerebral hemorrhage at his home at 137 Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. He was buried in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York in a coffin of red cedar with gold trimmings.

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