Paco Alcácer

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Paco Alcácer
Ukr-Spain2015 (12) - копия.jpg
Alcácer playing with Spain in 2015
Personal information
Full name Francisco Alcácer García
Date of birth (1993-08-30) 30 August 1993 (age 22)
Place of birth Torrent, Spain
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Valencia
Number 9
Youth career
1993–2003 Monte-Sión
2003–2005 Torrent
2005–2009 Valencia
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2009–2012 Valencia B 64 (42)
2010– Valencia 92 (30)
2012–2013 Getafe (loan) 21 (3)
National team
2009 Spain U16 3 (0)
2009–2010 Spain U17 11 (14)
2011 Spain U18 3 (5)
2011–2012 Spain U19 16 (7)
2013 Spain U20 7 (3)
2013 Spain U21 1 (0)
2014– Spain 13 (6)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15 May 2016.
† Appearances (goals)

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 27 March 2016
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Alcácer and the second or maternal family name is García.

Francisco "Paco" Alcácer García (Spanish pronunciation: ['pako al'kaθer]; born 30 August 1993) is a Spanish footballer who plays for Valencia CF and the Spain national team as a striker.

Having come through the Valencia youth ranks, he started playing with the first team in 2010, and became a regular following a loan at Getafe.

Alcácer won the European Championship twice with Spain's under-19 side, and made his senior international debut in 2014.

Club career[edit]

Born in Torrent, Valencian Community, Alcácer is a product of Valencia CF's youth system. He made his senior debut in the 2009–10 season aged only 16, scoring three goals in 15 games with the reserve side and suffering relegation from Segunda División B. On 11 November 2010 he appeared in his first match with the first team, playing the full 90 minutes in a 4–1 home win against UD Logroñés (7–1 on aggregate) in the Copa del Rey.[1]

On 12 August 2011, after Alcácer had netted the third and final goal in a 3–0 friendly win over A.S. Roma and was leaving the Mestalla Stadium accompanied by his parents, his father fell to the ground after suffering a heart attack. Despite 30 minutes of efforts by medics to revive him, the 44-year-old died,[2] and the player returned to training less than one week after, for "therapy purposes".[3] On 14 January 2012 he made his La Liga debut, coming on as a substitute for Sofiane Feghouli for the last 20 minutes of a 0–1 away loss against Real Sociedad.[4]

Alcácer in action for Getafe in 2013

For 2012–13 Alcácer went on loan to Getafe CF, his first official game being against Deportivo de La Coruña where he played 20 minutes in an eventual 1–1 away draw. He scored his first goal in the top division on 7 January 2013 at Rayo Vallecano, in a 1–3 loss.[5] After returning to Valencia, he scored first goal for his parent club on 3 October, during an away game against FC Kuban Krasnodar in the 2013–14 UEFA Europa League campaign.[6]

Alcácer scored his first league goal for Los Che on 25 January 2014, in a 2–2 home draw against RCD Espanyol.[7] He grabbed another the following matchday, scoring the 3–2 winner at the Camp Nou against FC Barcelona.[8]

On 10 April 2014, Alcácer scored the first hat-trick of his professional career, helping Valencia overturn a 0–3 first-leg deficit to beat FC Basel 5–0 at home and qualify for the semifinals of the Europa League.[9][10] It was his 14th competitive goal of the season, and his seventh in continental competition;[11][12] this European haul made him the edition's second-highest scorer after compatriot Jonathan Soriano, who netted eight for FC Red Bull Salzburg.[13]

On 17 August 2014, Alcácer scored the first goal in a 2–1 home win over A.C. Milan for the Orange Trophy, through a long-range shot.[14] He was assigned the number ′9′ jersey for 2014–15, previously worn by Hélder Postiga. On 9 December, near the end of a 1–1 draw at Granada CF, he was given a straight red card for striking Juan Carlos;[15] on 27 January 2015, it was revealed that he extended his contract until 2020 and his buy-out clause had been raised to €80 million.[16]

On 7 November 2015, Alcácer and Daniel Parejo scored twice each in a 5–1 win away to third-place Celta de Vigo.[17] The following 21 January, the former was stripped of his captaincy in favour of the latter by manager Gary Neville, after a poor run of results.[18]

After three months without a goal, Alcácer broke his barren spell with a hat-trick in a 4–0 home win over SD Eibar on 20 April 2016.[19] He finished the campaign with 15 across all competitions, in an eventual 12th-place finish.

International career[edit]

Alcácer warming up for Spain U19 in 2012

Alcácer represented Spain at all youth levels. With the under-17 side, he reached the final at the 2010 UEFA European Championship, playing alongside Valencia teammate Juan Bernat and being crowned the competition's top scorer with six goals, his 14 including qualifiers setting a new record;[20] additionally, he won the European Under-19 Championship twice, in 2011 and 2012.

On 29 August 2014, Alcácer was named by full side manager Vicente del Bosque in a 23-man squad for matches against France and Macedonia in September,[21] making his debut on 4 September after replacing Diego Costa midway through the second half of an eventual 0–1 friendly loss to the former.[22] Profiting from Costa's injury, four days later he made his first start, against Macedonia at the Estadi Ciutat de València, scoring his team's second goal in a 5–1 victory for the UEFA Euro 2016 qualifiers and also providing the assist for Sergio Busquets' third;[23] in their next qualifier, away to Slovakia on 9 October, the substitute scored an 82nd-minute equaliser, although Spain went on to lose 1–2.[24]

A year to the day, as a first-half replacement for the injured Álvaro Morata, Alcácer scored twice in a 4–0 win over Luxembourg which sealed qualification,[25] and he finished the qualification campaign with five goals, the most by a Spanish player.[26] However, he was not selected for the final tournament in France.[27]

International goals[edit]

No. Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 9 September 2014 Ciutat de València, Valencia, Spain  Macedonia 2−0 5−1 UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying
2. 9 October 2014 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Slovakia 1−1 1−2 UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying
3. 12 October 2014 Josy Barthel, Luxembourg, Luxembourg  Luxembourg 2−0 4−0 UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying
4. 11 June 2015 Reino de León, León, Spain  Costa Rica 1−1 2−1 Friendly
5. 9 October 2015 Las Gaunas, Logroño, Spain  Luxembourg 2−0 4−0 UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying
6. 3−0

Statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

As of match played 15 May 2016[28][29]
Club Season League Cup Continental Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Valencia 2010–11 La Liga 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
2011–12 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
2013–14 23 6 3 1 11 7 37 14
2014–15 32 11 4 3 36 14
2015–16 34 13 3 2 9 0 40 15
Total 92 30 11 6 20 7 123 43
Getafe (loan) 2012–13 La Liga 21 3 3 1 24 4
Career total 113 33 14 7 20 7 147 47

International[edit]

As of 27 March 2016[30]
Spain
Year Apps Goals
2014 5 3
2015 6 3
2016 2 0
Total 13 6

Honours[edit]

Spain U19

References[edit]

  1. ^ A octavos (4–1) (To the round-of-16 (4–1)); Valencia CF, 11 November 2010 (Spanish)
  2. ^ Fallece el padre de Paco Alcácer a las puertas de Mestalla (Paco Alcácer's father dies just outside Mestalla); Marca, 13 August 2011 (Spanish)
  3. ^ Alcácer vuelve a entrenarse como terapia para superar la pérdida (Alcácer returns to training as therapy to ovecome loss); Marca, 18 August 2011 (Spanish)
  4. ^ Griezmann guides Sociedad to victory; ESPN Soccernet, 14 January 2012
  5. ^ Rayo build momentum; ESPN FC, 7 January 2013
  6. ^ Patient Valencia claim Kuban success; UEFA.com, 3 October 2013
  7. ^ El 'Huracán Pizzi' se queda en temporal ('Hurricane Pizzi' reduced to a storm); Marca, 25 January 2014 (Spanish)
  8. ^ El Barça se pega un tiro en el pie (Barça shoots itself in the foot); Marca, 1 February 2014 (Spanish)
  9. ^ Ramírez, Delfín (10 April 2014). "Alcácer inspires historic Valencia comeback". UEFA.com. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  10. ^ "Alcácer: "Sin los compañeros los goles no los podríamos marcar"" [Alcácer: "Without the teammates we could not score goals"] (in Spanish). Marca. 11 April 2014. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  11. ^ "Paco Alcácer, el 'killer' del área" [Paco Alcácer, the 'killer' of the box] (in Spanish). Valencia CF. 11 April 2014. Retrieved 17 April 2014. 
  12. ^ "Paco Alcácer, el niño que soñaba con el fútbol en una cuna llena de balones" [Paco Alcácer, the boy who dreamed about football in ball-filled cradle] (in Spanish). El Confidencial. 12 April 2014. Retrieved 17 April 2014. 
  13. ^ "Eight-goal Soriano is Europa League top scorer". UEFA.com. 14 May 2014. Retrieved 23 March 2016. 
  14. ^ "El Valencia se lleva el Naranja" [Valencia wins Orange] (in Spanish). Super Deporte. 18 April 2014. Retrieved 18 April 2014. 
  15. ^ Liceras, Ángel (7 December 2014). "Success ordena el despropósito" [Success the father of all disarrays] (in Spanish). Marca. Retrieved 23 March 2016. 
  16. ^ "Paco Alcácer, renovado hasta 2020" [Paco Alcácer renewed his contract until 2020] (in Spanish). Super Deporte. 27 January 2015. Retrieved 27 January 2015. 
  17. ^ "Valencia’s Paco Alcácer and Dani Parejo on the double to beat Celta Vigo". The Guardian. 7 November 2015. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  18. ^ Maston, Tom (21 January 2016). "Neville replaces Valencia captain Parejo after poor results". Goal.com. Retrieved 23 March 2016. 
  19. ^ "Alcácer pone fin con tres goles a tres meses de sequía de cara a puerta" [Alcácer ends a three-month goal drought with three goals] (in Spanish). Eurosport. 20 April 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. 
  20. ^ Saffer, Paul (2010). "England end wait in style". UEFA.com. Retrieved 20 May 2015. 
  21. ^ "These are the players called up for the matches against France and Macedonia". Royal Spanish Football Federation. 29 August 2014. Retrieved 5 September 2014. 
  22. ^ "France 1–0 Spain". BBC Sport. 4 September 2014. Retrieved 5 September 2014. 
  23. ^ Jenson, Pete (8 September 2014). "Spain 5–1 Macedonia: David Silva stars as reigning champions get their Euro 2016 qualifying campaign off to a winning start". Daily Mail. Retrieved 8 September 2014. 
  24. ^ Hunter, Graham (9 October 2014). "Slovakia's Stoch strikes late to end Spain run". UEFA.com. Retrieved 9 October 2014. 
  25. ^ "Champions Spain through after Luxembourg stroll". UEFA.com. 9 October 2015. Retrieved 10 October 2015. 
  26. ^ "Euro 2016: Qualifiers for the tournament in France". BBC Sport. 12 October 2015. Retrieved 12 October 2015. 
  27. ^ "Diego Costa and Juan Mata left out of Spain’s provisional Euro 2016 squad". The Guardian. 17 May 2016. Retrieved 17 May 2016. 
  28. ^ "Paco Alcácer". Soccerway. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  29. ^ Paco Alcácer at ESPN FC
  30. ^ "Paco Alcácer". European Football. Retrieved 9 October 2014. 
  31. ^ "Crónica del República Checa-España, 2–3" [Czech Republic-Spain match report, 2–3] (in Spanish). Europa Press. 1 August 2011. Retrieved 10 September 2014. 
  32. ^ "La sub´19, campeona de Europa" [The U19, European champions] (in Spanish). La Nueva España. 15 July 2012. Retrieved 10 September 2014. 

External links[edit]