Francisco Vázquez Gómez

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Francisco Vásquez Gómez
Vasquez Gomez.jpg
Minister of Public Instruction
In office
26 May 1911 – 5 November 1911
President Francisco León de la Barra
Personal details
Born (1860-09-23)23 September 1860[1]
Tula, Tamaulipas, Mexico
Died 16 August 1933(1933-08-16) (aged 72)[1]
Mexico City, Mexico
Nationality Mexican
Spouse(s) Guadalupe Norma[citation needed]
Alma mater National School of Medicine (1889)
Profession Physician and politician

Francisco Vázquez Gómez (23 September 1860 – 16 August 1933) served as personal physician to Mexican president Porfirio Díaz,[2] as Minister of Public Instruction to President Francisco León de la Barra and as a running mate to Francisco I. Madero during the 1910 presidential elections. Prior to this Vázquez Gómez had been a supporter of Bernardo Reyes, another presidential hopeful with strong ties to Díaz' regime.[3]

Biography[edit]

Vázquez Gómez was born in Tula, Tamaulipas, into a rich Amerindian family. He studied Medicine in Mexico City and worked as a physician in Xalapa before returning to serve as the personal physician to long-time serving President Díaz. In 1909, he joined his brother Emilio in the anti-reelectionist movement but refused to join a national call to arms after the government illegally imprisoned former presidential candidate Francisco I. Madero, with whom he campaigned on a narrow, pro free-market and democratic government.[4]

After a short voluntary exile in El Paso, Texas, he returned to Mexico to assume the Ministry of Public Instruction in the presidential cabinet of Francisco León de la Barra (26 May - 5 November 1911).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Microsoft Encarta Online (2008). "Francisco Vázquez Gómez" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 2009-10-31. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  2. ^ McLynn, Frank. Villa and Zapata: A History of the Mexican Revolution. p. 30
  3. ^ McLynn. Villa and Zapata p. 30
  4. ^ Hart, John Mason. Revolutionary Mexico: The Coming and Progress of the Mexican Revolution p. 240

External links[edit]