Franciszek Leja

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Franciszek Leja (January 27, 1885 in Grodzisko Górne near Leżajsk – October 11, 1979 in Kraków, Poland) was a Polish mathematician.

He was born to a poor peasant family in the southeastern Poland. After graduating from the University of Lwów he was a teacher of mathematics and physics in high schools from 1910 until 1923, among others in Kraków. From 1924 until 1926 he was a professor at the Warsaw University of Technology and from 1936 until 1960 in the Jagiellonian University.

During the Second World War he lectured on the underground universities in Łańcut and Leżajsk. But after the German invasion of Poland in 1939 life there became extremely difficult. There was a strategy by the Germans to wipe out the intellectual life of Poland. To achieve this Germans sent many academics to concentration camps and murdered others. In one of such actions he was sent to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp which he fortunately survived.

Since 1948 he worked for the Institute of Mathematics of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He was a co-founder of the Polish Mathematics Society in 1919 and from 1963 until 1965 the chairman. Since 1931, he was a member of the Warsaw Science Society (TNW).

His main scientific interests concentrated on analytic functions, in particular the method of extremal points and transfinite diameters.

Works[edit]

  • Rachunek różniczkowy i całkowy ze wstępem do równań różniczkowych (pub. 1947, pub. 16 1979)
  • Funkcje zespolone (pub. 1967, pub. 5 1979).

See also[edit]