Franck Passi

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Franck Passi
Valais Cup 2013 OM -FC Porto-Franck Passi crop.jpg
Personal information
Full name Franck Passi
Date of birth (1966-03-28) 28 March 1966 (age 54)
Place of birth Bergerac, France
Playing position(s) Midfielder
Youth career
1980–1982 AS Béziers
1982–1983 Montpellier HSC
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1983–1986 Montpellier 87 (1)
1986–1988 Marseille 61 (3)
1988–1990 Toulouse 74 (2)
1990–1993 Toulon 84 (3)
1993–1994 Monaco 19 (0)
1994–1999 Compostela 179 (6)
1999–2001 Bolton Wanderers 38 (0)
Total 542 (15)
National team
1988 France U21
Teams managed
2004 Compostela (caretaker)
2012–2016 Marseille (assistant)
2015 Marseille (caretaker)
2016 Marseille (caretaker)
2017 Lille (interim)
2019 Monaco (caretaker)
2020– Chamois Niortais
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Franck Passi (born 28 March 1966) is a French retired footballer and coach. As of January 2020, he is the manager of Ligue 2 club Chamois Niortais. Passi is the brother of fellow footballer, Gérald Passi, and the father of Bryan Passi.

Coaching career[edit]

Passi worked in a player recruitment role for one of his old clubs, Olympique Marseille, between 2007 and 2010 before becoming Reserve Team Coach at the club in May 2010. In 2012, he was promoted again, this time as assistant coach to Elie Baup. After the departure of Baup in December 2013, Passi continued his duties as assistant coach under Jose Anigo, as well as under Argentine coach Marcelo Bielsa.

After Bielsa's shock exit in August 2015, Passi was appointed caretaker boss in the interim for the club's next few games as Marseille searched for Bielsa's replacement. He was promoted to caretaker boss in April 2016 once more after the departure of Bielsa's successor Míchel. Passi led his side to the 2016 Coupe de France Final, losing 4–2 to rivals Paris Saint-Germain He led Marseille for exactly six months until October 2016, when the club appointed Rudi Garcia as Míchel's replacement.

Passi was interim coach at Lille for the last few months of the 2016–2017 season. On 24 January 2019, Passi was named caretaker coach of Monaco, following the suspension of Thierry Henry.[1] He oversaw the team for just one match, a 2–0 defeat to Dijon, before Leonardo Jardim was installed as permanent coach.

In January 2020, Passi was appointed as manager of Ligue 2 club Chamois Niortais until the end of the 2019–20 season following the departure of Pascal Plancque.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Passi comes from a family of footballers. His father, Camille Passi, was a Congolese former footballer, and coach in his later career.[3] His son, Bryan Passi, is a professional footballer who also played for Montpellier.[4] His brother, Gérald Passi, was also a professional footballer who played for the France national football team.[5]

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 20 May 2017
Managerial record by team and tenure
Team Nat From To Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Compostela (caretaker)[6] Spain 6 January 2004 12 January 2004 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 000.00
Marseille (caretaker) France 10 August 2015 18 August 2015 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 000.00
Marseille (caretaker) France 19 April 2016 19 October 2016 15 6 5 4 18 16 +2 040.00
Lille (interim) France 14 February 2017 24 May 2017 15 7 2 6 20 18 +2 046.67
AS Monaco (caretaker)[7] France 24 January 2019 27 January 2019 1 0 0 1 0 2 –2 0.00
Total 33 13 7 13 39 39 +0 039.39

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Communiqué officiel". AS Monaco (in French). 2019-01-24. Retrieved 2019-01-24.
  2. ^ Laurent Pruneta (13 January 2020). "Ligue 2: Franck Passi nommé entraîneur de Niort". Le Parisien. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  3. ^ "Franck Passi raconté par son frère Gérald: "Être numéro deux, pour Franck, c'était contre-nature"". www.20minutes.fr.
  4. ^ Rédaction. "Bryan Passi, fils de Franck, passe professionnel à Montpellier".
  5. ^ "Un spectateur nommé Passi". 31 July 2012. Archived from the original on 10 August 2018. Retrieved 22 June 2017.
  6. ^ "Passi: Franck Passi: Matches 2003–04". BDFutbol. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  7. ^ "Communiqué officiel". AS Monaco (in French). 2019-01-24. Retrieved 2019-01-24.

External links[edit]