Frank Bergin

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Frank Bergin
Biographical details
Born(1886-07-05)July 5, 1886
New Haven, Connecticut
DiedNovember 11, 1971(1971-11-11) (aged 85)
New Haven, Connecticut
Playing career
1907–1909Princeton
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1910–1912Bowdoin
1913Middlebury
Head coaching record
Overall12–14–3
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 Maine Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1910)

Frank S. Bergin (July 5, 1886 – November 11, 1971) was an American football player, coach, and official. He played college football as a quarterback at Princeton University from 1907 to 1909. Bergin was the head football coach at Bowdoin College from 1910 to 1912 and Middlebury College in 1913, compiling a career college football coaching record of 12–14–3. He refereed college football games for several years after World War I. Bergin was served in the Connecticut Senate, representing the 10th district in New Haven, and was the chairman of Connecticut Liquor Control Commission. He died on November 11, 1971, at the age of 85.[1]

Bergin was born on July 5, 1886, in New Haven, Connecticut. He graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1906, Princeton in 1910, and Columbia Law School in 1913.[2]

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Bowdoin Polar Bears (Maine Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1910–1912)
1910 Bowdoin 6–1–2 1st
1911 Bowdoin 2–3–1
1912 Bowdoin 2–6
Bowdoin: 10–10–3
Middlebury Panthers (Independent) (1913)
1913 Middlebury 2–4
Middlebury: 12–14–3
Total: 12–14–3
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Frank Bergin, Football Ref, Dies At 85". Naugatuck Daily News. Naugatuck, Connecticut. United Press International. November 13, 1971. p. 10. Retrieved March 3, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  2. ^ "Frank S. Bergin, Football Coach". The New York Times. November 13, 1971. Retrieved March 3, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.