Frank Chickens

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Kazuko Hohki (with Tomoko Minamazaki and Ray Hogan) in rehearsal with Frank Chickens in 1998

Frank Chickens are a Japanese musical group based in London, who have performed songs mainly in English from 1982.[1]

They were nominated for the 1984 Edinburgh Comedy Award for their performance at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. In the same year, their single "Blue Canary" was number 42 in BBC DJ John Peel's Festive Fifty, a poll of his listeners' favourite tracks of the year.[2] The band recorded 28 songs over five sessions for Peel between 1983 and 1989.[3]

In 1989 they hosted a television chat show on Channel 4 entitled Kazuko's Karaoke Klub.[4]

One of the founders of the group, Kazuko Hohki performs as a theatre artist and performance artist. She also sang with the group Kahondo Style who released 'My Heart’s In Motion' (1985) and 'Green Tea and Crocodiles' (1987).

In 2010 the group won the Foster's Edinburgh Comedy God Award,[5] after the public responded to an e-mail sent in anger by comedian Stewart Lee to the organisers of the award.[6]

Discography[edit]

Singles

  • "We Are Ninja" / "Fujiyamamama", (Kaz 1984)
  • "We Are Ninja (Not Geisha)", (Kaz 1984)
  • "Blue Canary", (Kaz 1984)
  • "Blue Canary" (12"), (Kaz 1984)
  • "Yellow Toast", (Kaz 1987)
  • "Do the Karaoke" / "Jackie Chan", (Kaz 1989)
  • "Annabella" / "Different", (Eggy Pop 1996)
  • "We Are Ninja Remix Collection ", (Ninja Tune 2000)

Albums

Compilations

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Frank Chickens performance schedule". Frank Chickens. Retrieved July 26, 2010. [dead link]
  2. ^ "Keeping it Peel, John Peel, Peel, Festive 50, 1984". BBC. Retrieved July 21, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Keeping it Peel Artist A-Z (archived content)". BBC. Retrieved December 11, 2015. 
  4. ^ Guardian Media Monkey. Retrieved 23 November 2013
  5. ^ "Frank Chickens win 'Comedy God' award". BBC. August 30, 2010. Retrieved August 30, 2010. 
  6. ^ Lee, Stewart (3 August 2010). "Frank Chickens: Edinburgh gods". The Guardian. Retrieved 29 February 2016. 

External links[edit]