Frank Lowe (advertiser)

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Sir Frank Lowe
Born Frank Budge Lowe
August 1941 (age 76–77)
Nationality British
Known for advertising agency pioneer
Spouse(s) Dawn Lowe
Pat Booth (2008-09, her death)
50 Glebe Place, 2008

Sir Frank Budge Lowe (born August 1941)[1] is a pioneer of the advertising agency.

Career[edit]

He first rose to fame running Collett Dickenson Pearce, which he built into one of the best known agencies in the United Kingdom. In 1981, he started Lowe Howard-Spink, which eventually became Lowe & Partners Worldwide. In 1979 Lowe arranged sponsorship of the Queen's Club Championships which became known as the Stella Artois tournament, an arrangement that lasted almost 30 years. He became founder and president.

Lowe built 50 Glebe Place in Chelsea between 1985 and 1987.[2][3][4]

In the 2001 Queen's Birthday Honours Lowe was knighted for services to charity and advertising, allegedly less than a year after donating £2m to the country's first City Academy, Capital City Academy, in North West London.[5]

He quit his eponymous agency in 2003, becoming its chairman emeritus, after falling out with parent Interpublic[6] who had acquired Lowe Worldwide in 1990.

After fulfilling a two-year non-compete clause, Lowe founded the Red Brick Road integrated agency, taking its name from the route that Dorothy didn't follow in the Wizard of Oz.[7] He launched by poaching Tesco's £50m advertising account from Lowe Worldwide. Other clients include Gala Coral, Sky One, Heineken and Olympus.[8] In 2010 Lowe announced that he was "stepping back from day-to-day involvement" [9]

Personal life[edit]

Lowe was married 5 times. His fourth wife was a US citizen, Dawn Lowe. They were married for 16 years and had a son, Sebastian.[10]

In 2008 Lowe married for the fifth time to sixties model Pat Booth.[5] She died of cancer in 2009, aged 66.

Legacy[edit]

Lowe is the only account manager to have won The President's Award from the Design and Art Directors Association of London.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "LOWE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED - Officers (free information from Companies House)". Beta.companieshouse.gov.uk. Retrieved 27 April 2017. 
  2. ^ Bridget Cherry; Nikolaus Pevsner (1 March 1991). London 3: North West. Yale University Press. p. 576. ISBN 978-0-300-09652-1. 
  3. ^ "Building 9842". UK Modern House Index. Retrieved 16 April 2016. 
  4. ^ Tim Bell; David Hopper (30 June 2015). Right Or Wrong: The Memoirs of Lord Bell. Bloomsbury USA. p. 102. ISBN 978-1-4729-0935-0. 
  5. ^ a b Walker, Tim (30 April 2008). "Daily Telegraph: Fifth time lucky for Sir Frank and his model". The Daily Telegraph. London. Retrieved 2 October 2008. 
  6. ^ "Guardian: Sir Frank Lowe". The Guardian. London. 17 July 2006. Retrieved 2 October 2008. 
  7. ^ Brook, Stephen (30 January 2006). "Guardian: Lowe follows Red Brick Road". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2 October 2008. 
  8. ^ "Red Brick Road Clients". Retrieved 2 October 2008. 
  9. ^ 'Adage: ORIGINAL MAD MAN FRANK LOWE LEAVES RED BRICK ROAD'
  10. ^ "Texas Dawn's love for her legal eagle | Daily Mail Online". Dailymail.co.uk. Retrieved 27 April 2017. 

External links[edit]