Frank Windsor

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Frank Windsor
Born Frank W. Higgins
(1927-07-12) 12 July 1927 (age 90)
Walsall, Staffordshire, England, UK
Occupation Actor
Years active 1959-present
Spouse(s) Mary Corbett

Frank Windsor (born Frank W. Higgins; 12 July 1927) is a British actor, mainly on television.

Biography[edit]

Windsor attended Queen Mary's Grammar School, Walsall, and studied speech training and drama at the Central School of Speech and Drama, then based at the Royal Albert Hall, London.[1] He played Detective Sergeant John Watt in Z-Cars from 1962 to 1965, and thereafter its spin-offs Softly, Softly and Softly, Softly: Taskforce from 1966 to 1976. He appeared as 'Tobin' in Series 6, Episode 9 of The Avengers. From 1987 to 1989 he starred in the comedy drama Flying Lady written by Brian Finch.[2] He starred as a rather old-fashioned headmaster grappling with problems in education in Headmaster, which started as a single play in Play for Today in 1974 and was well received, being expanded into a six-part series in 1977. In 1969 he appeared in the pilot episode of Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) in the episode "My Late Lamented Friend and Partner" as Sorrensen, a wealthy businessman with a murderous streak. His lighter side was demonstrated in the pilot episode of the situation comedy The Dustbinmen in 1968, and as Scoutfinder General in an episode of The Goodies.[3]

He had regular roles in the BBC drama Casualty; the ITV drama Peak Practice; he played Major Charlie Grace in EastEnders (1992); appeared twice in Doctor Who; had various stage roles, and in his later years appeared in a number of television commercials advertising life-assurance policies for people over-50.[3] He was the subject of This Is Your Life on 3 December 1975 when he was surprised by Eamonn Andrews at the Metropolitan Police Sports Club in East Molesey.[4]

Partial filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ‘Fogie – The Life (1865-1945) of Elsie Fogerty Pioneer of speech training for the theatre and everyday life’, Marion Cole (Peter Davis, London, 1967)
  2. ^ "Obituary: Brian Finch". theguardian.com. 2014. Retrieved 5 December 2014. 
  3. ^ a b Frank Windsor on IMDb
  4. ^ "Frank Windsor". Bigredbook.info. Retrieved 17 May 2017.