Franklin D. Roosevelt High School (Dallas, Texas)

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Franklin D. Roosevelt High School
FDR HS.JPG
Address
525 Bonnie View Road
Dallas, Texas 75216
United States
Coordinates 32°44′30″N 96°47′43″W / 32.74175°N 96.79532°W / 32.74175; -96.79532Coordinates: 32°44′30″N 96°47′43″W / 32.74175°N 96.79532°W / 32.74175; -96.79532
Information
School type Public, comprehensive high school
Motto Pride, Respect, Dignity, and Responsibility
Founded 1963
School district Dallas Independent School District
Superintendent Michael Hinojosa, Ed.D.
Area trustee Lew Blackburn, Ph.D. (District 5)
Principal Brian De Veaux
Grades 9-12
Enrollment 551 (2014-2015)
 • Grade 9 199
 • Grade 10 143
 • Grade 11 116
 • Grade 12 93
Language English
Color(s)           light medium blue & White
Mascot Mustang
Team name Mighty Mustangs, female(horse)Mustang
Communities served Southeast Oak Cliff
Feeder schools O.W.Holmes Middle School Academy
Students considered a racial minority 549 (99.6%)
Students not considered a racial minority 2 (0.4%)
Division 2
Website
[1]

Franklin D. Roosevelt High School is a public secondary school in the Oak Cliff area of Dallas, Texas (USA), serving grades 9 - 12. The school opened in 1963[2] and is part of the Dallas Independent School District.

The school serves communities, including Cadillac Heights South Dallas and some Oak Cliff area [3][4]

History[edit]

Construction of the school began in 1961 at 525 Bonnie View Road in the Oak Cliff area. Built before the school district integrated its high schools, the campus was the first new "Negro high school" built in Dallas since 1939 at the time it opened in January 1963.[2] The school was built to serve a maximum capacity of 2000 students and at its opening was expected to draw about 1200 students from the Oak Cliff area, most previously attending Madison High School — which had itself been converted to a "Negro school" in 1956 to relieve overcrowding at Booker T. Washington and Lincoln high schools.[5]

The school is named after former U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In honor of him passing and assisting lower class citizens opportunity for growth. School colors chosen. Light blue and white and red. Most recent colors used for FDR are navy blue, light blue and white.

In 2005, after the closure of Wilmer-Hutchins High School. Roosevelt absorbed some WHISD high school students.[6]

In 2011 the district re-opened Wilmer Hutchins High.[7] Some former WHISD zones covered by Roosevelt were rezoned to Wilmer-Hutchins.[8][9]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Texas Education Agency. "2008 Campus AEIS Report". Retrieved 20 December 2008. 
  2. ^ a b Carlos Conde. "School OK'd on condition," The Dallas Morning News, January 24, 1963, section 4, page 1.
  3. ^ "Dallas Floodway Extension Project." (Direct image link) Trinity River Corridor. Retrieved on July 17, 2010.
  4. ^ "Fall 2009 Franklin D. Roosevelt High School Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins (Grades 9-12)." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 17, 2010.
  5. ^ Sue Connally. "Forest assigned to Negro pupils: District added to Crozier's," The Dallas Morning News, June 14, 1956, section 1, pages 1 and 9. Note: At that time, "district" was used in Dallas to refer to the attendance zone of a specific school, rather than the system as a whole.
  6. ^ "Fall 2006 Franklin D. Roosevelt High School (9-12) Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  7. ^ Hobbs, Tawnell D. (2010-11-24). "Dallas school district to open 3 Wilmer-Hutchins campuses, close 2 others". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved 2011-07-15. 
  8. ^ "Roosevelt2010.pdf Fall 2010 Franklin D. Roosevelt High School Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins - Grades 9-12." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  9. ^ "Fall 2011 Wilmer-Hutchins High School Attendance Zone Grades 9-12." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  10. ^ "Waymond Bryant". databaseFootball.com. Retrieved November 10, 2012. 
  11. ^ Game of My Life: 25 Stories of Aggie Football. p. 175. 
  12. ^ "Lt Richmond Webb". CNN. 1994-09-05. Retrieved 2010-05-02.