Fraternal Order of Real Bearded Santas

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Fraternal Order of Real Bearded Santas
Fraternal Order of Real Bearded Santas logo.jpg
TypeCA non-profit entity
HeadquartersGarden Grove, Orange County, California
Region served
National
Membership
850
Official language
English
Director and President Emeritus
Bob Callahan
Websiteforbssantas.com

The Fraternal Order of Real Bearded Santas (FORBS) is an American organization for men who look like Santa Claus and make a vow to promote a positive image of Santa.[1] All members, as the name states, must have real beards. The organization meets monthly and hosts seminars as well as classes. It has approximately 850 members in 16 chapters.[2] Membership dues are $25 per year.[3]

History[edit]

The Fraternal Order of Real Bearded Santas was formed as a splinter group of the Amalgamated Order of Real Bearded Santas after a disagreement over leadership and membership qualifications.[4] The Amalgamated Order of Real Bearded Santas was founded in 1994 by ten Santas hired for a TV commercial in Los Angeles.[5][6]

By 2007, the Order had around 700 paying members. As the organization grew, infighting and charges of bylaw violations and profiteering among the leadership led to the departure of several board members and the creation of splinter groups, including FORBS.[5][6]

Documentary film[edit]

The organization and its members are a main theme of the 2014 documentary film I Am Santa Claus featuring Mick Foley.

References[edit]

  1. ^ TRACY WOOD (23 December 2011). "Even Santa Claus Has an Association". Voice of OC.
  2. ^ Steven Lane (23 March 2012). "Bits 'n' Pieces: That's President Santa yo you". The Columbian.
  3. ^ "MD01 - MemberDues". santareunionstore.com.
  4. ^ "Unlocking the Secret Lives of Santa". Haddonfield-haddon Township, New Jersey Patch.
  5. ^ a b Leonard, Tom. "Santas plunged into civil war". www.telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved August 18, 2015.
  6. ^ a b Carlton, Jim (July 10, 2008). "These Santas are keeping a list, and not all have been nice". Wall Street Journal.