Freak Alley

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The Freak Alley parking lot, looking south from W. Bannock St.

Freak Alley is a notable venue for public art in the form of murals and graffiti[1] located in and adjacent to a service alley in downtown Boise, Idaho. The largest outdoor gallery in the Northwest,[2][3] and a Boise institution since 2002,[4] it began with a painting of a single alley doorway and now extends from the alley itself to a gravel parking lot.[5] Extant murals painted over and replaced by new murals (or incorporated into them) every two years;[6] collectively it is the work of more than 200 artists.[7] It has featured prominently in a survey of ten mid-sized American cities with thriving artistic communities in which Boise ranked second.[8] The site, along with the back of the Union Block, received a $500,000 renovation in 2018 from the city.[9]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.movoto.com/blog/opinions/boise-stereotypes/?src=fb
  2. ^ https://arbiteronline.com/2015/12/15/boise-freaks-paint-the-town/
  3. ^ "Freak Alley and Boise's Public Art | For 91 Days in Idaho – Travel Blog". Idaho.for91days.com. 2013-01-07. Retrieved 2014-02-27.
  4. ^ http://www.boiseweekly.com/boise/freaks-and-fish/Content?oid=2919580
  5. ^ "Freak Alley Gallery Breathes Life Into Boise's Art Scene". Boise State Public Radio. 2012-08-14. Retrieved 2014-02-27.
  6. ^ Gross, Josh (2012-08-12). "Slideshow: Freak Alley Gallery Debuts 76 New Murals | Cobweb". Boiseweekly.com. Retrieved 2014-02-27.
  7. ^ Ross, Winston (2018-03-25). "Freak Alley". Newsweek. Retrieved 2018-03-26.
  8. ^ https://www.gogobot.com/blog/2015/11/17/the-10-most-artistic-mid-sized-cities-in-america/
  9. ^ Webb, Anna (2017-09-13). "Will half a million dollars improve these 2 Downtown alleys, or wreck their cool factor?". Idaho Statesman. Retrieved 2017-09-13.


See also[edit]