Fred Brathwaite

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Fred Brathwaite
Fred Brathwaite 2015.jpg
Born (1972-11-24) November 24, 1972 (age 45)
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Height 5 ft 7 in (170 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Goaltender
Caught Left
Played for Edmonton Oilers
Calgary Flames
St. Louis Blues
Columbus Blue Jackets
Ak Bars Kazan
Avangard Omsk
Adler Mannheim
National team  Canada
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 1993–2014

Fredrick Brathwaite (born November 24, 1972) is a Canadian ice hockey coach and former player. He serves as goaltending coach for the New York Islanders of the National Hockey League (NHL).

Brathwaite played as a goaltender, and spent his career with the Edmonton Oilers, Calgary Flames, St. Louis Blues and Columbus Blue Jackets in the NHL before finishing his career overseas with Ak Bars Kazan, Avangard Omsk and Adler Mannheim. Brathwaite was named Deutsche Eishockey Liga MVP in 2009.

Playing career[edit]

Following junior hockey with the Orillia Travelways/Orillia Laidlaw, Brathwaite played major junior for the Oshawa Generals, London Knights and Detroit Jr. Red Wings in the Ontario Hockey League (OHL). Undrafted, he was signed by the Edmonton Oilers in 1993. He played in the Oilers' system for three seasons between the NHL and Edmonton's American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Cape Breton Oilers.

In 1996–97, Brathwaite began a two-season stint with the Manitoba Moose of the International Hockey League (IHL). In his first season with the Moose, he scored a rare goal as a goaltender November 19, 1996.[1]

Brathwaite began the 1998–99 season on the Canadian National Team before being signed by the Calgary Flames. He appeared in 28 games, recording a 2.45 goals against average and .915 save percentage in what qualified as his NHL rookie season. He remained with the Flames for two more seasons until he was traded to the St. Louis Blues by general manager Craig Button as part of a deal for goaltender Roman Turek in the 2001 off-season.[2] He played with the Blues for two seasons as a backup before being signed by the Columbus Blue Jackets for the 2003–04. In his sole season with the Blue Jackets, he backed up Marc Denis while also spending time in the AHL with the Syracuse Crunch.[2]

Due to the 2004–05 NHL lockout, Brathwaite played overseas in the Russian Superleague for Ak-Bars Kazan. He remained there for two seasons until returning to North America to play in the AHL for the Chicago Wolves. After two seasons in Chicago, Brathwaite went back to Europe to join Adler Mannheim of the German Deutsche Eishockey Liga.[3] In his first season in Germany, Brathwaite reeled off a 2.37 GAA, .925 save percentage performance to be named the German league's 2009 MVP.[4]

Coaching career[edit]

After his playing career, he worked as goaltending coach of German team Adler Mannheim[5] and served as Hockey Canada's goaltending consultant.[6]

On July 10, 2017, the New York Islanders announced that Brathwaite was hired as goaltending coach.[7]

Personal life[edit]

Brathwaite was born in Ottawa, Ontario to parents who had emigrated to Canada from Barbados in 1964. He appeared in the Jermaine Dupri rap video "Welcome to Atlanta" with the rappers the St. Lunatics. The scene was shot at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Individual Records". Manitoba Moose. Archived from the original on 2009-11-06. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  2. ^ a b "Fred Brathwaite player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-01-24. 
  3. ^ "NHL dream burns bright in Brathwaite". Calgary Herald. 2008-11-09. Retrieved 2010-01-24. 
  4. ^ Klein, Jeff Z. (2009-02-27). "Special Day in Germany for McLlwain and Brathwaite". New York Times. Retrieved 2010-01-24. 
  5. ^ Douglas, William. "Ready for Freddy? Fred Brathwaite works toward becoming an NHL goalie coach". TheColorOfHockey. Retrieved 2016-02-20. 
  6. ^ "CHL Canada Russia Series". canadarussia.chl.ca. Retrieved 2016-02-20. 
  7. ^ "Islanders Name Fred Brathwaite Goaltending Coach". NHL.com. July 10, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 

External links[edit]