Fred Curry (wrestler)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Fred Curry
Birth name Fred Thomas Koury Jr.
Born (1943-06-12) June 12, 1943 (age 73)[1]
Professional wrestling career
Ring name(s) Fred Curry
Billed height 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Billed weight 200 lb (91 kg)
Billed from Hartford, Connecticut
Trained by Bull Curry[2]
Debut 1960s[2]

Fred Thomas Koury Jr. (born June 12, 1943[1]) better known by his ring name ”Flying'” Fred Curry, was an American professional wrestler of Lebanese descent. The son of "Wild Bull" Curry, Fred Koury was one of the most popular stars in the Midwest United States and the rest of the world during the 1960s and 70s'. Flying Fred Curry had notable feuds with wrestling legend The Sheik. Flying Fred Was a sensational star in Texas in the sixties and teamed up with Fritz von Erich. Flying Fred Curry is noted as one of the greatest highflyers and dropkickers of all time. His most famous feat is throwing 15 to 20 dropkicks in a matter of 10 seconds, curry is also noted for being the most popular wrestler in the world in 1972.[3]

Career[edit]

In the 1960s, Koury, Jr. took up wrestling under the name "Flying'" Fred Curry. Unlike his father, Fred was a clean cut, high flying wrestler, and a fan favorite. The two Currys teamed up on a regular basis during the early part of the younger Curry’s career. The two won the NWA International Tag Team Championship in 1964 and held it until 1966,[4] as well as beating Nikolai and Boris Volkoff for the Ohio version of the NWA World Tag Team Championship.[2]

Later in his career Fred Curry struck out on his own trying to get away from his father’s legacy of rule-breaking. Fred’s attempts to get out of his father’s shadow never caused any problems between the two Currys.[4]

In December 1972, he defeated Kurt Von Hess and Karl Von Shotz along with Tony Marino to win the Detroit version of NWA World Tag Team Championship. On January 5, 1973, they lost the titles back to Kurt Von Hess and Karl Von Shotz. They received their second Detroit titles on February 2 and lost it back to Kurt Von Hess and Karl Von Shotz on February 18.

A family business[edit]

Curry's son Fred III is currently pursuing a career in pro-wrestling and was being trained by Dory Funk, Jr.. Fred III has taken the high-flying style similar to his father. He is currently wrestling in the independent circuit in the Northeastern United States.

In wrestling[edit]

Championships and accomplishments[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Fred Curry". wrestlingclassics.com/currys/.com. Retrieved 2008-09-28. 
  2. ^ a b c "Fred Curry's Profile at Online World of Wrestling". onlineworldofwrestling.com. Retrieved 2008-09-28. 
  3. ^ Conner, Floyd. Wrestling's Most Wanted: The Top 10 Book of Pro Wrestling's Outrageous Performers, Punishing Piledrivers and Other Oddities. Dulles, Virginia: Brassey's, 2001. ISBN 1-57488-308-9 (pg. 210)
  4. ^ a b Inside Wrestling (October 1972). "Fred Curry's Heartbreaking Decision: "I Had to Leave My Father to Restore our Good Name!"". London Publishing Co. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). Wrestling Title Histories (4th ed.). Archeus Communications. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  6. ^ "N.W.A. World Tag Team Title (Detroit)". Puroresu Dojo. 2003. 
  7. ^ "N.W.A. American Tag Team Title". Puroresu Dojo. 2003. 
  8. ^ "N.W.A. International Tag Team Title". Puroresu Dojo. 2003. 
  9. ^ "N.W.A. Texas Junior Heavyweight Title". Puroresu Dojo. 2003. 
  10. ^ "N.W.A. Hawaii Heavyweight Title". Puroresu Dojo. 2003. 

External links[edit]