Fred E. Field

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Providence Home for Aged Men, Providence, RI. 1891–95.

Frederick E. Field (1861–1931) was an American architect who practiced in Providence, Rhode Island, and Orlando, Florida, in the period between 1883 and 1927.[1]

His professional training took place at Cornell University.[2]

In 1883, Field opened his practice in the city of Providence. In 1902, he took his head draftsman, Harry A. Slocomb, as partner in Field & Slocomb.[3] This firm was dissolved in January 1904, with both returning to independent practice.[4] In 1907, he joined noted architect Howard Hoppin (1856–1940) in the firm of Hoppin & Field. This, in turn, became Hoppin, Field & Peirce in 1922, when Thomas J. Hill Peirce joined the firm. This firm was soon dissolved, and the partners went their separate ways. By the mid-1920s, Field had moved to Orlando. He had opened his own practice there by 1926.[5] In 1927, Charles E. Choate, who had been in Orlando since 1925, took him as partner in Choate & Field.[6] This firm appears to have dissolved soon afterward, as Choate moved to Birmingham that same year.[7] By the time of his death in 1931, Field was once again practicing in Providence.[8]

Field was received into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects in 1889.[9]

Architectural work[edit]

In private practice, 1883–1902:

  • Valentine Gernershausen Duplex, 25–27 Adelaide Ave., Providence, RI (1884)[10]
  • Atwells Avenue Primary School, 235 Atwells Ave., Providence, RI (1887) – Demolished.[11]
  • Veazie Street Primary School, 287 Veazie St., Providence, RI (1887) – Demolished.[11]
  • George J. West House, 95 Roanoke St., Providence, RI (1889)[10]
  • Peace Street Grammar School, 49 Peace St., Providence, RI (1889) – Demolished.[12]
  • Waldo J. Slocomb House, 12 Brighton St., Providence, RI (1889)[13]
  • Academy Avenue Grammar School, 38 Academy Ave., Providence, RI (1890) – Demolished.[14]
  • Frederick E. Field House, 102 Melrose St., Providence, RI (1890) – The architect's own home.[15]
  • Police Station No. 6, 38 Chaffee St., Providence, RI (1890)[14]
  • Providence Home for Aged Men, 807 Broad St., Providence, RI (1891–95)[10]
  • River Avenue Primary School, 159 River Ave., Providence, RI (1891) – Demolished.[16]
  • Roger Williams Park Stable, Roger Williams Park, 1000 Elmwood Ave., Providence, RI (1891) – Now the zoo administration building.[17]
  • Valentine Gernershausen Duplex, 21–23 Adelaide Ave., Providence, RI (1891)[10]
  • Foster N. Gunnison House, 150 Lexington Ave., Providence, RI (1892)[18]
  • Manual Training High School, 119 Pond St., Providence, RI (1892) – Demolished.[19]
  • Messer Street Grammar School, 158 Messer St., Providence, RI (1892)[19]
  • John S. Whitehouse House, 195 Lexington Ave., Providence, RI (1894)[20]
  • Dutee Wilcox Building, 180 Washington St., Providence, RI (1895) – Demolished.[21]
  • Hendrick Street Primary School, 64 Hendrick St., Providence, RI (1895) – Demolished.[22]
  • Ruggles Street Primary School, 110 Ruggles St., Providence, RI (1895)[23]
  • Columbia Building, 15 Snow St., Providence, RI (1897)[24]
  • Masonic Temple, 127 Dorrance St., Providence, RI (1897)[10]
  • John H. Hambly House, 44 Oriole Ave., Providence, RI (1898)[25]
  • William R. Tillinghast House, 268 Angell St., Providence, RI (1898)[26]
  • John F. Allen House, 40 Oriole Ave., Providence, RI (1899)[25]
  • Albert J. Schmid House, 100 Elmgrove Ave., Providence, RI (1900)[10]
  • Edmund D. Chesebro House, 421 Elmwood Ave., Providence, RI (1900)[10]
  • Walter S. Hough House, 278 Olney St., Providence, RI (1901)[27]

Field & Slocomb, 1902–1904:

Private practice, 1904–1907:

  • America Street Primary School, 22 America St., Providence, RI (1904) – Demolished.[29]
  • Regent Avenue Primary School, 101 Regent Ave., Providence, RI (1904)[30]
  • Helen A. W. Hudson Duplex, 24–26 President Ave., Providence, RI (1905)[31]
  • Helen A. W. Hudson Duplex, 34–36 President Ave., Providence, RI (1907)[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ familysearch.org
  2. ^ Cornell University list of graduates
  3. ^ American Architect and Building News 18 Jan. 1902: x.
  4. ^ American Architect and Building News 9 Jan. 1904: x.
  5. ^ Orlando City Directories. 1926–1931.
  6. ^ American Architect 1927: 268.
  7. ^ American Architect 1929: 212.
  8. ^ Power 1931: 426.
  9. ^ American Art Directory. R. R. Bowker Company.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Woodward, Wm. McKenzie. Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources. 1986.
  11. ^ a b Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Buildings for 1887. 1888.
  12. ^ Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Buildings for 1889. 1890.
  13. ^ Engineering and Building Record 24 Aug. 1889.
  14. ^ a b Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Buildings for 1890. 1891.
  15. ^ Engineering and Building Record 16 Aug. 1890: 176.
  16. ^ Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Buildings for 1891. 1892.
  17. ^ Jordy, William H. and Christopher P. Monkhouse. Buildings on Paper: Rhode Island Architectural Drawings, 1825–1945. 1982.
  18. ^ Providence City Archives
  19. ^ a b Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Buildings for 1893. 1894.
  20. ^ Carpentry and Building Feb. 1895: 29.
  21. ^ Engineering Record 15 June 1895: ix.
  22. ^ Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Buildings for 1895. 1896.
  23. ^ Engineering Record 3 June 1895: ix.
  24. ^ American Architect and Building News 24 Oct. 1896: xv.
  25. ^ a b Blackstone Park Historic District NRHP Nomination. 1998.
  26. ^ American Architect and Building News 4 June 1898: 2.
  27. ^ Olney Street-Alumni Avenue Historic District NRHP Nomination. 1989.
  28. ^ American Architect and Building News 3 April 1903: 5.
  29. ^ America Street School NRHP Nomination. 1987.
  30. ^ Engineering News 7 July 1904: 4.
  31. ^ a b Wayland Historic District NRHP Nomination. 2005.