Fred J. Burrell

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Fred J. Burrell
Fred J. Burrell.png
Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts
In office
January 21, 1920 – September 3, 1920
Preceded by Charles L. Burrill
Succeeded by Albert P. Langtry
Henry A. Wyman
John R. Macomber (acting)
Delegate to the 1917 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention[2]
Representing the 26th Middlesex District of the Massachusetts House of Representatives[2]
In office
June 6, 1917[1] – April 6, 1918[3]
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives[4]
26th Middlesex District[5]
In office
1917[4] – 1919[4]
Personal details
Born March 12, 1889[4][5]
Medford, Massachusetts[4][5]
Political party Republican[4]
Occupation Publisher of textile textbooks,[5] Advertising agent[4][5]

Fred Jefferson Burrell (March 12, 1889 – October 15, 1955)[1] was a Massachusetts businessman and politician who served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives and as Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts from January 21, 1920 – September 3, 1920.

1917 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention[edit]

In 1916 the Massachusetts legislature and electorate approved a calling of a Constitutional Convention.[6] In May 1917,[1] Burell was elected to serve as a member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention of 1917, representing the 26th Middlesex District of the Massachusetts House of Representatives.[2]

Massachusetts Treasurer[edit]

Elected Treasurer in 1919, Burrell resigned from the position on September 3, 1920, following an investigation by a special legislative committee, which revealed that banks using the services of an advertising agency owned by Burrell received increased amounts of state money.[7] Burrell was also criticized for depositing $125,000 of state funds with Hanover Trust Company, a bank run by Charles Ponzi.[8]

Burrell denied any wrongdoing and ran for Treasurer four more times after his resignation, losing to Charles F. Hurley in 1930, John E. Hurley in 1944 and 1950, and to Roy C. Papalia in the 1952 Republican primary.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, p. 7
  2. ^ a b c Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, p. 11
  3. ^ Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, p. 626.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Richard T., Howard (1920), Public officials of Massachusetts (1920), Boston, MA: The Boston Review, p. 26
  5. ^ a b c d e Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1917), A Souvenir of Massachusetts legislators 1917, Volume XXVI, Stoughton, MA: A. M. Bridgman, p. 113.
  6. ^ Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, pp. 7–8
  7. ^ "BURRELL RESIGNS; DENIES WRONGDOING; State Treasurer Quits as Bank Officials Testify State Deposits Followed Advertising. Amounts within the Law but Institution Felt It Was "HeldUp" for Patronage of State Official's Agency" (PDF). The New York Times. September 4, 1920.
  8. ^ "COOLIDGE APPOINTS JACKSON TREASURER; Director of Red Cross Activities in Massachusetts During the War Succeeds Burrell. LATTER QUIT UNDER FIRE Auditor Finds His Accounts Correct and Legislative Inquiry Halts Until Wednesday" (PDF). New York Times. September 5, 1920. Retrieved 2010-02-15.
  9. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/CandidateDetail.html?CandidateID=222444