Frédéric Lefebvre

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Frédéric Lefebvre
Frédéric Lefebvre.JPG
Member of the National Assembly for the First Overseas Constituency
In office
July 2007 (2007-July) – July 2009 (2009-July)
Preceded byCorinne Narassiguin
Succeeded byRoland Lescure
In office
June 2013 (2013-June) – June 2017 (2017-June)
Preceded byAndré Santini
Succeeded byAndré Santini
Personal details
Born (1963-10-14) 14 October 1963 (age 57)
Neuilly-sur-Seine, France
Political partyLa République En Marche! (2019-present)
Other political
affiliations
Agir (2017–19)
The Republicans (2015–17)
Union for a Popular Movement (2002–15)
Rally for the Republic (before 2002)
Spouse(s)Valérie Lefebvre
ChildrenQuentin and Alix
ProfessionAttorney

Frédéric Lefebvre (French pronunciation: ​[fʁedeʁik ləfɛvʁ]; born 14 October 1963 in Neuilly-sur-Seine) is a French politician who served as Secretary of State for Trade, Small and Medium Enterprises, Tourism, Services, Liberal professions and Consumption under the Minister of Economy, Finance and Industry, François Baroin, in the government of Prime Minister François Fillon. From 2008 to 2009 and from 2013 until 2017, he was a member of the National Assembly, representing the Hauts-de-Seine department.[1] He is also the founder of l'Ame Nord, a non-profit organization dedicated to serve the interests of French residents living in the US and Canada.

Political career[edit]

Lefebvre was first elected to the National Assembly in the 2007 elections. In parliament, he served on the Finance Committee from 2007 until 2009.[2] In 2008, he introduced an amendment to President Nicolas Sarkozy's immigration law to allow illegal foreign employees to apply for work permits if their employers can show they are important to the economy.[3]

Lefebvre was the UMP's candidate in the for First constituency for French residents overseas (for French expatriates in Canada and the United States) in the 2012 legislative election,[4][5] but lost against Corinne Narassiguin, who received 54.01% of the votes. On 15 February 2013, the Constitutional Council canceled the election and said Corinne Narassiguin ineligible.[6] He topped the first round of the early parliamentary elections, and after the second round, 9 June 2013, he was elected against the Socialist candidate, Frank Scemama, with 53.72% of the vote. He subsequently served on the Defence Committee from 2013 until 2017.[7]

Lefebvre was a candidate in the 2016 Republican presidential primary.[8]

In the 2017 elections, Lefebvre lost his re-election race against Roland Lescure, the candidate of La République En Marche! (LREM); Lescure won 80 percent of the vote, to Lefebvre's 20 percent.

In November 2017, Lefebvre was among the co-founders of Agir[9] and served as the party's vice-chairman.[10] In 2019, however, he joined LREM.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lefebvre, le député du président". Le Parisien. Retrieved April 10, 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Frédéric Lefebvre National Assembly.
  3. ^ Celestine Bohlen (May 27, 2008), French illegal workers' strike puts their value to test International Herald Tribune.
  4. ^ "Amérique du Nord : l'UMP désigne Lefebvre" Archived 2016-05-27 at the Wayback Machine, Le Journal du dimanche, 25 November 2011
  5. ^ Emily Brennan (June 8, 2012), In New York, French Politics Is Local New York Times.
  6. ^ Emily Brennan (February 22, 2013), Victory, Then Defeat New York Times.
  7. ^ Frédéric Lefebvre National Assembly.
  8. ^ http://www.france24.com/en/20160215-france-les-republicains-presidential-primary-cope-sarkozy-juppe
  9. ^ Marion Mourgue (November 26, 2017), «Agir, la droite constructive», une nouvelle force politique à droite Le Figaro.
  10. ^ Luke Baker (June 3, 2019), Exit of French center-right leader bolsters Macron's grip Reuters.
  11. ^ Albert Zennou (September 18, 2019), Frédéric Lefebvre: «J’ai décidé d’adhérer à En marche!» Le Figaro.

External links[edit]