Frederic William Howay

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Frederic William Howay
Born (1867-11-25)November 25, 1867
London, Ontario, Canada
Died October 4, 1943(1943-10-04) (aged 75)
New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
Nationality Canadian
Known for Historian

Frederic William Howay, FRSC (November 25, 1867 – October 4, 1943), also spelled Frederick, was a Canadian historian, lawyer, and jurist.

Born in London, Ontario, Howay moved to British Columbia as a child. After attending school in New Westminster, Howay wrote his Provincial Teachers' exam in 1884 in Victoria, British Columbia. He spent three years teaching at schools in Canoe Pass and Boundary Bay. In 1887, he studied law at Dalhousie University and received a Bachelor of Law degree in 1890. He was called to the British Columbia bar in 1891. In 1907, he was appointed a Judge of County Court of New Westminster. He retired in 1937.[1]

In 1933, he was awarded the Royal Society of Canada's J. B. Tyrrell Historical Medal. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the Royal Geographical Society and the Royal Historical Society.[2] In 1932, he was elected to the American Antiquarian Society.[3] From 1922 to 1926, he was president of the British Columbia Historical Federation. From 1941 to 1942, he was president of the Royal Society of Canada. He also served as a member of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, briefly serving as its interim chairman.[4]

In 1933, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of British Columbia.[5] Mount Judge Howay, north of Stave Lake, is named in his honour.[6]

He died in 1943 in New Westminster, British Columbia.

Selected works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Frederic William Howay Map Collection". University of British Columbia. 
  2. ^ "J. B. Tyrrell Historical Medal citation". Royal Society of Canada. 
  3. ^ "Member Directory". American Antiquarian Society. 
  4. ^ Recognizing Canadian History: The Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. Ottawa: Parks Canada. 1979. p. 62, 130. ISBN 0-662-50533-6. 
  5. ^ "UBC Honorary Degree Citations". University of British Columbia. 
  6. ^ Helen B. Akrigg (1997). British Columbia Place Names. UBC Press. ISBN 0-7748-0637-0. 
Professional and academic associations
Preceded by
Robert Charles Wallace
President of the Royal Society of Canada
1941–1942
Succeeded by
James Collip