Frederick A. Tallmadge

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Frederick A. Tallmadge
Frederick A. Tallmadge.jpg
Clerk of the Court of Appeals
In office
January 1, 1863 – December 31, 1865
Preceded by Charles Hughes
Succeeded by Patrick H. Jones
Member of the United States House of Representatives from New York's 5th District
In office
March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849
Preceded by Thomas M. Woodruff
Succeeded by George Briggs
Recorder of New York City
In office
January 1, 1849 – December 31, 1851
Preceded by John B. Scott
Succeeded by Francis R. Tillou
In office
1841 – 1846
Preceded by Robert H. Morris
Succeeded by John B. Scott
Member of the New York State Senate
In office
January 1, 1837– December 31, 1840
Preceded by Myndert Van Schaick
Succeeded by John B. Scott
Personal details
Born Frederick Augustus Tallmadge
(1792-08-29)August 29, 1792
Litchfield, Connecticut
Died September 17, 1869(1869-09-17) (aged 77)
Litchfield, Connecticut
Political party Whig
Spouse(s) Elizabeth "Eliza" H. Canfield
Parents Benjamin Tallmadge
Alma mater Yale College
Litchfield Law School
Military service
Allegiance  United States of America
Rank Captain
Battles/wars War of 1812

Frederick Augustus Tallmadge (August 29, 1792 – September 17, 1869) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.

Life[edit]

He was born on August 29, 1792, in Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of Benjamin Tallmadge (1754–1835). William Floyd (1734–1821) was his grandfather. He graduated from Yale College in 1811. Then he studied law at Litchfield Law School, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in New York City in 1813.

Career[edit]

Tallmadge fought as a captain in the War of 1812.

He was a member of the Board of Aldermen in 1834 and, under the new city charter, of the Common Council in 1836. He was a member of the New York State Senate (1st D.) from 1837 to 1840, sitting in the 60th, 61st, 62nd and 63rd New York State Legislatures. He was Recorder of New York City from 1841 to 1846, and from 1848 to 1851.

He was elected as a Whig to the 30th United States Congress, holding office from March 4, 1847, to March 3, 1849. He was Superintendent of the Metropolitan Police from 1857 to 1862. In 1861, he ran on the "Independent People's" ticket for Canal Commissioner but was defeated by Democrat William W. Wright. He was Clerk of the New York Court of Appeals from 1863 to 1865, elected in 1862 on the Democratic/Constitutional Union ticket. Afterwards he resumed the practice of law in New York City.

Personal life[edit]

He married Elizabeth "Eliza" H. Canfield (1793–1878) and together they had:

  • Frederick Samuel Tallmadge (c.1823–1904), who was president of the New York Society of the Sons of the Revolution from 1884 until his death in 1904.[1]

He died on September 17, 1869, at the home of his daughter in Litchfield, Connecticut;[2] and was buried at the East Cemetery there.

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ DIED; TALLMADGE in the New York Times on June 22, 1904
  2. ^ OBITUARY; Hon. Frederick A. Talimadge in the New York Times on September 18, 1869

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Charles Hughes
Clerk of the Court of Appeals
January 1, 1863 – December 31, 1865
Succeeded by
Patrick H. Jones
Preceded by
John B. Scott
Recorder of New York City
January 1, 1849 – December 31, 1851
Succeeded by
Francis R. Tillou
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas M. Woodruff
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 5th congressional district

March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849
Succeeded by
George Briggs
Legal offices
Preceded by
Robert H. Morris
Recorder of New York City
1841–1846
Succeeded by
John B. Scott
New York State Senate
Preceded by
Myndert Van Schaick
New York State Senate
First District (Class 2)

January 1, 1837– December 31, 1840
Succeeded by
John B. Scott