Frederick E. Toy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Frederick E. Toy
Born 1866
Buffalo, New York, United States
Died August 5, 1933(1933-08-05) (aged 66–67)
Lewiston, New York
Place of burial Riverdale Cemetery
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1883–1910 ; 1917–1919
Rank
  • ordnance sergeant
  • captain
Unit
Battles/wars
Awards Medal of Honor ribbon.svg - Medal of Honor
Spouse(s)
  • Alice Morrow (m. 1893; her death 1927)
  • Margaret Hood Crawford (m. 1928; his death 1933)[citation needed]
Other work
  • employment manager
  • railroad police

Frederick Ernest Toy (1860s – August 5, 1933) was a soldier in the U.S. Army during the Indian and Spanish-American Wars; During his enlisted service, he was assigned to the 7th Cavalry Regiment until promoted to ordnance sergeant and served at a variety of posts. He received the Medal of Honor for bravery at the Battle of Wounded Knee against the Sioux Indians on December 29, 1890. Toy retired from the Army in 1910. He was recalled and commissioned as a captain during World War I. He worked as an employment manager and as a railroad police officer.

Early life[edit]

Toy was born in Buffalo, New York in the early– to mid–1860s to Ernst and Catherine Toy. The 1870 U.S. Census shows his given name as Fred and his estimated birth year as 1864–1865.[1] He was educated in the Buffalo public schools.[2] The 1880 U.S. Census shows his given name as Friedrich and his estimated birth year as 1865.[3] The record of his first enlistment shows his estimated year of birth as 1862.[4] The Hall of Valor shows his birth year as 1866.[5]

Enlisted Army career[edit]

Sergeant Toy (on the right) receiving the Medal of Honor at Fort Riley, Kansas, 1891.

Frederick Toy was a career enlisted soldier, serving from 1883 to 1910. All of his enlisted terms of service ended with the expiration of his term of service and with character evaluations of "excellent." All of Toy's service was with Troop G, 7th Cavalry Regiment until he was promoted to ordnance sergeant.[4][6][7][8][9][10][11]

Toy first enlisted on October 16, 1883 at Chicago, Illinois; his enlistment record reflects the given name of Frederick and his age as 21 (birth year 1861 or 1862).[4] In April 1888, Toy was promoted from corporal to sergeant while assigned to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.[12] On September 15, 1888, Toy was discharged as a sergeant at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.[4]

Toy reenlisted on October 16, 1888 at Fort Riley, Kansas.[6] He was among the cavalrymen ordered to capture Chief Big Foot. On December 29, 1890, troopers surrounded the Sioux camp on Wounded Knee Creek with the intention of arresting the Sioux chieftain and disarming his followers.[13] Toy, a sergeant on the day of the battle, was commanded by Captain Winfield Scott Edgerly.[13] Toy was one of twenty men awarded the Medal of Honor for their actions that day. Toy was cited for "bravery displayed while shooting hostile Indians;" It was changed on the final citation after being returned by the War Department. Captain Edgerly said Sergeant Toy did "deliberately aim at and hit two Indians who had run into the ravine." Toy was presented the medal in a public ceremony, which was featured in Harper's Weekly. He also attained the rank of first sergeant by the time his Medal of Honor was awarded on May 26, 1891. The appropriateness of the award of the Medal of Honor to Toy, as well as to the others awarded for Wounded Knee, was challenged more than 100 years later.[13] Toy was discharged at Fort Clark, Texas.[6]

In early November 1893, Toy and Alice Marrow (sic) were married in Junction City, Kansas; the Toys expected to proceed to Fort Clark, Texas.[14] First Sergeant Toy reenlisted on November 15, 1893 at Fort Riley. First Sergeant Toy was discharged at Camp Forse, Alabama.[7] On November 15, 1898, Toy reenlisted at Huntsville, Alabama. He was discharged at Columbia Barracks, Cuba.[8]

Toy reenlisted on November 15, 1901 at Columbia Barracks.[9] On June 4, 1903, Toy, who had been promoted from first sergeant to ordnance sergeant on June 2, 1903, was ordered to proceed from Camp George H. Thomas, Georgia to Fort Sheridan, Illinois.[15] He was discharged as an ordnance sergeant while assigned to Fort Sheridan.[9] Toy immediately reenlisted at Fort Sheridan on November 15, 1904. He was discharged, again as an ordnance sergeant, at Madison Barracks, New York.[10] Toy reenlisted on November 15, 1907 as an ordnance sergeant at Madison Barracks.[11] On October 13, 1908, the War Department ordered Toy, then at Madison Barracks, to report to Fort Niagara, New York for duty.[16] In the 1910 U.S. Census, Toy is shown to be living at Fort Niagara while serving as an "O.S." in the U.S. Army.[17] He retired from the Army on October 15, 1910 as an ordnance sergeant by authority of War Department Special Orders 239 dated October 12, 1910.[11]

During his career, Toy served as an orderly to President Theodore Roosevelt.[18][dubious ]

Commissioned Army career[edit]

During World War I, Toy was among retired Regular Army personnel who were recalled to serve as trainers; he was commissioned as a captain in the Quartermaster Corps and assigned to the 303d Stevedore Regiment; he returned to his Niagara Falls, New York home on July 18, 1919 and anticipated mustering out of the U.S. Army during August 1919.[19] He had served as a transportation quartermaster in Brest, France.[2]He reverted to the rank of master sergeant after the war; a special act of Congress restored him to the rank of captain without increasing his retired pay.[20][21] In the 1920 U.S. Census, his occupation is reflected as "Captain, U.S. Army."[22] Toy, identified as a major, commanded the Special Troops, 98th Infantry Division (part of the Organized Reserve of New York State) from March 26, 1922 to November 10, 1924.[23] Toy, again identified as a major, was ordered to attend training camp from July 15 through August 2, 1922.[24]

Later life and death[edit]

After his military service, Toy was employed as the employment manager of the Aluminum Company of America and later as a lieutenant for the New York Central Railroad Company police.[2] In December 1921, Toy was a candidate for chief of police of Niagara Falls.[25] Toy was a member of Camp number 7 of the United Spanish War Veterans [26] He also joined the Niagara Frontier Chapter of the Military Order of the World War.[27] He died on August 5, 1933, and is buried at Riverdale Cemetery in Lewiston, New York. Toy's grave marker identifies him as a captain.[2][28]

Awards[edit]

Medal of Honor[5]
Indian Campaign Medal[29]:70–71
Spanish War Service Medal[29]:71
Army of Cuban Occupation Medal[29]:71
World War I Victory Medal[29]:70

Medal of Honor citation[edit]

Rank and organization: First Sergeant, Troop G, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at:--. Birth: Buffalo, N.Y. Date of issue: 26 May 1891.

Citation

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to First Sergeant Frederick Ernest Toy, United States Army, for bravery on 29 December 1890, while serving with Company G, 7th U.S. Cavalry, in action at Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota.[5]

Honors[edit]

Frederick Toy's name is memorialized on side C of the Medal of Honor monument in Niagara Falls State Park.[30]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "United States Census, 1870," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8FB-TRL : 17 October 2014), Fred Toy in household of Ernst Toy, New York, United States; citing p. 259, family 2133, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,432.
  2. ^ a b c d "Captain F. E. Toy, Railroad Police Official, Passes". Niagara Falls Gazette. August 7, 1933. p. 1. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  3. ^ "United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MZZB-2T6 : 14 July 2016), Friedrich Toy in household of Ernst Toy, Buffalo, Erie, New York, United States; citing enumeration district ED 134, sheet 386B, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0829; FHL microfilm 1,254,829.
  4. ^ a b c d "United States Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDR-7F1C : 24 May 2014), Frederick E Toy, 16 Oct 1883; citing p. 37, volume 082, Chicago, , Illinois, United States, NARA microfilm publication M233 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 43; FHL microfilm 350,349.
  5. ^ a b c "Frederick Ernest Toy". Hall of Valor. Military Times. Retrieved 2 November 2015. The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to First Sergeant Frederick Ernest Toy, United States Army, for bravery on 29 December 1890, while serving with Troop G, 7th U.S. Cavalry, in action at Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota. 
  6. ^ a b c "United States Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJD5-LRXF : 24 May 2014), Fredk E Toy, 16 Oct 1888; citing p. 214, volume 086, Fort Riley, , Kansas, United States, NARA microfilm publication M233 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 45; FHL microfilm 1,319,378.
  7. ^ a b "United States Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDR-HW3F : 24 May 2014), Frederick E Toy, 15 Nov 1893; citing p. 202, volume 092, Fort Riley, , Kansas, United States, NARA microfilm publication M233 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 48; FHL microfilm 1,465,934.
  8. ^ a b "United States Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDR-Z8QQ : 24 May 2014), Frederick E Toy, 15 Nov 1898; citing p. 238, volume 096, Huntsville, , Alabama, United States, NARA microfilm publication M233 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 50; FHL microfilm 1,465,936.
  9. ^ a b c "United States Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDR-F911 : 24 May 2014), Frederick E Toy, 15 Nov 1901; citing p. 227, volume 108, Columbia Barracks, , Cuba, United States, NARA microfilm publication M233 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 56; FHL microfilm 1,465,942.
  10. ^ a b "United States Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDR-VPN5 : 24 May 2014), Frederick E Toy, 15 Nov 1904; citing p. 215, volume 116, Fort Sheridan, , Illinois, United States, NARA microfilm publication M233 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 60; FHL microfilm 1,465,946.
  11. ^ a b c "United States Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDR-2VXL : 24 May 2014), Frederick E Toy, 15 Nov 1907; citing p. 241, volume 120, Madison Barracks, , New York, United States, NARA microfilm publication M233 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 62; FHL microfilm 1,465,948.
  12. ^ "Promotion of Frederick E. Toy to Sergeant". The Leavenworth Times. Leavenworth, Kansas. April 4, 1888. p. 2.  free to read
  13. ^ a b c Green, Jerry (1994). "The Medals of Wounded Knee" (PDF). nebraskahistory.org. Nebraska State Historical Society. pp. 200–208. Retrieved 2 November 2015. 
  14. ^ "Toy Marries Marrow". Manhattan Mercury. Manhattan, Kansas. November 8, 1893. p. 5.  free to read
  15. ^ "Ordnance Department" (Vol XL, Number 41). The United States Army and Navy Journal. June 13, 1903. Retrieved 8 June 2017. 
  16. ^ "Ordnance Department–Brigadier General William Crozier". Army-Navy-Air Force Register and Defense Times (Volume 44). October 17, 1908. p. clxvi. 
  17. ^ "United States Census, 1910," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M5HJ-BKM : accessed 4 June 2017), Frederick Toy, Porter, Niagara, New York, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 130, sheet 8B, family 208, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 1049; FHL microfilm 1,375,062.
  18. ^ "Indian Fighter Quits Army; Sergt. Toy, Medal of Honor Man, Placed on the Retired List.". New York Times. January 15, 1911. 
  19. ^ "Capt. Toy Returns to Home at Falls". Buffalo Courier. July 19, 1919. p. 10. Retrieved 12 June 2017. 
  20. ^ "Orders for Army Officers". New York Herald. December 27, 1917. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  21. ^ "Retired as Captain" (PDF). The Niagara Falls Gazette. July 10, 1933. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  22. ^ "United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MVMG-SWB : accessed 2 June 2017), Frederick Toy, Niagara Falls Ward 10, Niagara, New York, United States; citing ED 124, sheet 34B, line 56, family 750, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 1242; FHL microfilm 1,821,242.
  23. ^ Clay, Steven E. US Army Order of Battle 1919–1941: Volume 3 The Services: Air Service, Engineers, and Special Troops, 1919–41 (pdf). Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: Combat Studies Institute Press, US Army Combined Arms Center. p. 1915. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  24. ^ "Maj. Toy Assigned" (PDF). The Niagara Falls Gazette. July 17, 1922. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  25. ^ "Tom Walters for Chief of Police" (PDF). The Niagara Falls Gazette. December 30, 1921. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  26. ^ "Addresses Vets". The Niagara Falls Gazette. July 18, 1928. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  27. ^ "Military Order of World War Elects". Buffalo Courier. September 7, 1923. p. 12. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  28. ^ Don Morfe. "Frederick E. Toy". Find a Grave. Retrieved June 30, 2010. 
  29. ^ a b c d "Military Awards" (PDF). Army Publishing Directorate. U.S. Army. Retrieved November 28, 2015. 
  30. ^ "Niagara Falls Medal of Honor Memorial Side C". The Memorial Day Foundation. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 

External links[edit]