Frederick II, Margrave of Meissen

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Frederick II
Dresden Fürstenzug 084.JPG
Frederick I, Margrave of Meissen (1307–1324), Frederick II, Margrave of Meissen (1324–1349), and Frederick III, Landgrave of Thuringia (1349–1381); Fürstenzug, Dresden, Germany
Margrave of Meissen
Landgrave of Thuringia
Reign 1323-1349
Predecessor Frederick I
Successor Frederick III
Born (1310-11-30)30 November 1310
Gotha, Duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg, Holy Roman Empire
Died 18 November 1349(1349-11-18) (aged 38)
Wartburg, Duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg, Holy Roman Empire
Spouse Mathilde of Bavaria
Issue
Detail
Elisabeth, Burgravine of Nuremberg
Frederick III, Landgrave of Thuringia
Balthasar, Landgrave of Thuringia
William I, Margrave of Meissen
Full name
Frederick the Serious
House House of Wettin
Father Frederick I, Margrave of Meissen
Mother Elisabeth von Lobdeburg-Arnshaugk

Frederick II, the Serious (German: Friedrich II. der Ernsthafte) (30 November 1310 in Gotha – 18 November 1349 at the Wartburg), Margrave of Meissen, son of Frederick I, Margrave of Meissen and Elisabeth von Lobdeburg-Arnshaugk.

Biography[edit]

In 1323 he started as a sole heir under guardianship of his mother the succession of his late father in the Margraviate of Meissen and the Thuringia. After he had become mature in 1329, he had to pass long-term fights with the vassals and neighbours. These conflicts mainly rose due to Frederick's declaration of peace in 1338, which drastically diminished the rights and influence of the small landlords and the local rulers, and which goal was the subjugation of the latter two groups.[1] In 1342, dissatisfied nobles, whose concerns were their rights and independence, banded together in Arnstadt (southwest of Erfurt) against Frederick II, in what would be known as the Thuringian Count's War.[1] The conflict would last up to 1346. After the death of emperor Ludwig IV, the Bavarian party tried to move him to the acceptance of the German crown, however, he mistrusted the inconstancy of his voters and rejected such strange request in favour of Charles IV of Luxembourg. Friedrich II limited himself to consolidate his rule and to defend against the danger going out from Charles IV. At a meeting 1348 in Bautzen both recognized the existing possession states.

Family[edit]

Frederick II married May 1323 in Nürnberg Mathilde of Bavaria, daughter of Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor and had 9 children:

  1. Elisabeth (22 November 1329 – 21 April 1375), married to Frederick V of Nuremberg.
  2. Frederick (born and died 1330)
  3. Frederick III, Landgrave of Thuringia
  4. Balthasar (1336-1406)
  5. Beatrice (1 September 1339 – 15 July 1399), nun in Weißenfels
  6. Louis (25 February 1340 – 17 February 1382), (Bishop of Bamberg)
  7. William the One-eyed
  8. Anne (7 August 1345 – 22 March 1363), nun in Seußlitz
  9. Clara (born 7 August 1345)

Ancestors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rogers 2010, p. 190.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

Frederick II, Margrave of Meissen
Born: 30 November 1310 Died: 18 November 1349
Preceded by
Frederick I
Margrave of Meissen
1323–1349
Succeeded by
Frederick III