Frederick Irving

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Frederick Irving
Frederick Irving.jpg
United States Ambassador to Jamaica
In office
July 18, 1977 – November 22, 1978
President Jimmy Carter
Preceded by Sumner Gerard
Succeeded by Loren E. Lawrence
Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs
In office
April 28, 1976 – March 26, 1977
President Gerald Ford
Preceded by Dixie Lee Ray
Succeeded by Patsy Mink
United States Ambassador to Iceland
In office
October 11, 1972 – April 21, 1976
President Richard Nixon
Preceded by Luther Repogle
Succeeded by James J. Blake
Personal details
Born May 2, 1921
Providence, Rhode Island, United States
Died November 13, 2016(2016-11-13) (aged 95)
Amherst, Massachusetts, United States
Resting place Arlington National Cemetery
Spouse(s) Dorothy Petrie
(m. 1946; d. 2010)
Alma mater Brown University (BA)
The Fletcher School (MA)
National War College
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch  United States Army
(Army Air Forces)
Years of service 1943–1945
Rank US-O3 insignia.svg First Lieutenant
Battles/wars World War II
Awards Purple Heart ribbon.svg Purple Heart

Frederick Irving (May 2, 1921 – November 13, 2016) was an American diplomat and civil servant. He was United States Ambassador to Iceland from 1972 to 1976, Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs from 1976 to 1977, and United States Ambassador to Jamaica from 1977 to 1978.

Biography[edit]

Frederick Irving was born in Providence, Rhode Island on May 2, 1921.[1][2] He studied at Classical High School, where he met his future wife, Dorothy.[3] He was educated at Brown University, receiving an A.B. in political science in 1943.[2]

After graduating from Brown, Irving served in the United States Army Air Corps for the remainder of World War II[3] as a navigator.[1] On his 37th bombing mission, his B-24 Liberator heavy bomber was shot down over Hungary as he was returning from bombing the Blechhammer oil refinery.[1][4] He spent the remainder of the war as a prisoner of war at Stalag Luft III.[2]

After the war, he attended Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and received an M.A. in international relations.[2] He then studied at the National War College.[2]

Irving then joined the United States Foreign Service and worked there for 32 years.[2] In September 1972, President of the United States Richard Nixon nominated Irving to be United States Ambassador to Iceland. He served there until 1976. In 1976, President Gerald Ford nominated Irving as Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs and he held this position until 1977. President Jimmy Carter then named him United States Ambassador to Jamaica.

Irving retired in 1978, and died on November 13, 2016.[1]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Irving, Frederick. "Mr. President, Do You Think I Have Rocks In My Head?" Experiences of Frederick Irving. ISBN 978-1937146900. 

References[edit]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Luther Replogle
United States Ambassador to Iceland
October 11, 1972 – April 21, 1976
Succeeded by
James J. Blake
Government offices
Preceded by
Dixy Lee Ray
Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs
April 28, 1976 – March 26, 1977
Succeeded by
Patsy Mink
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Sumner Gerard
United States Ambassador to Jamaica
July 18, 1977 – November 22, 1978
Succeeded by
Loren E. Lawrence

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