Frederick Winslow Hatch

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Frederick Winslow Hatch (August 1, 1789 – January 14, 1862) was an Episcopal clergyman who served as Chaplain of the Senate of the United States.

Early years[edit]

Frederick Winslow Hatch was born August 1, 1789, in Blandford, Massachusetts, the son of Lucretia Rockwell and Timothy Hatch.[1]

Ministry[edit]

Hatch was ordained a deacon by Bishop Thomas John Claggett in 1810. He served in St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Edenton, North Carolina, (1811–1815)[2] until he moved to All Saint’s Church, Fredericktown, Maryland.[3]

Hatch then served in Charlottesville, Virginia from 1820–1830, and while there, the original Christ Church was erected (1824-'25), this was the first denominational building in the village. The plan for the church was furnished, though not designed, by Thomas Jefferson, but it was demolished in 1895.[4] He also preached at Buck Mountain Episcopal Church and Walker’s during this time.[5] The Hatch’s home was about two miles down the road from Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. Family members recalled waving to General Lafayette, James Madison and other revolutionary figures on their way to see the former President.[6]

In 1830 Hatch became the rector of Washington Parish, District of Columbia.[7] While there, he served as Chaplain of the Senate from 1833 until 1835.

In 1836 he moved to St. Paul's Church, Poughkeepsie, New York.[8][9][10]

He was the first rector of St Matthew’s Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, (then called Southport) where he went with is family in 1843 and stayed till moving to California in 1856 to live near his son.[11]

He died in Sacramento, California, on January 14, 1862.[12] He is interred in the Sacramento Historic City Cemetery.[13]

Personal life[edit]

He married first, Frances Lowry Robertson in Baltimore in 1812; she died while they were in Edenton, North Carolina. He married secondly, Mary Ann Weatherburn[14] They had four children, two sons and two daughters.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thomas Hatch Descendants, rootsweb.com
  2. ^ The Episcopal Church in North Carolina, 1701-1959, by Lawrence Foushee London, Episcopal Church. Diocese of North Carolina p.89
  3. ^ History of Western Maryland: Being A History Of Frederick, Volume 1, by John Thomas Scharf, Helen Long, p. 507 & 508
  4. ^ The Albemarle of Old, by Jeffrey C. Weaver, Arlington, VA
  5. ^ Albemarle County in Virginia: Giving Some Account Of What It Was by Nature, by Edgar Woods p. 127-9
  6. ^ See: http://www.oldcitycemetery.com/FrederickWinslowHatch.htm
  7. ^ History of Western Maryland: Being A History Of Frederick, Volume 1, by John Thomas Scharf, Helen Long, p. 507
  8. ^ The Records of Christ Church, Poughkeepsie, New York: History] 1755-1910, by Christ Church (Poughkeepsie, N.Y.), Helen Wilkinson Reynolds p. 165
  9. ^ Journal of the Proceedings Of The Bishops, The Clergy And The Laity, by Episcopal Church. General Convention, p. 179
  10. ^ History of Western Maryland: Being A History Of Frederick, Volume 1, by John Thomas Scharf, Helen Long, p. 507
  11. ^ Hinsdale genealogy: descendants of Robert Hinsdale of Dedham, by Herbert Cornelius Andrews, Sanford Charles Hinsdale, p. 235
  12. ^ History of Western Maryland: Being A History Of Frederick, Volume 1, by John Thomas Scharf, Helen Long, p. 507
  13. ^ "Sacramento Historic City Cemetery Burial Index" (PDF). Old City Cemetery Committee. 2005. Retrieved January 3, 2013. 
  14. ^ Lineage book - National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Volume 36. by Daughters of the American Revolution, p. 240
  15. ^ Hinsdale genealogy: descendants of Robert Hinsdale of Dedham, by Herbert Cornelius Andrews, Sanford Charles Hinsdale, p. 235
Religious titles
Preceded by
Charles Constantine Pise
29th US Senate Chaplain
December 10, 1833 – December 23, 1835
Succeeded by
Edward Young Higbee