Frederick W. Houser

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Frederick Wilhelm Houser
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of California
In office
October 1, 1937 – October 12, 1942
Appointed by Governor Frank Merriam
Preceded by Ira F. Thompson
Succeeded by B. Rey Schauer
Presiding Justice of the California Court of Appeal, Second District, Division One
In office
1935 – September 30, 1937
Assemblyman from the 74th district in the California State Assembly
In office
January 1903 – March 1903
Personal details
Born (1871-04-15)April 15, 1871
Jones County, Iowa, U.S.
Died October 12, 1942(1942-10-12) (aged 71)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Spouse(s) Sara Wilde (m. 1902)
Alma mater University of Southern California (LL.B.)

Frederick Wilhelm Houser (April 15, 1871 – October 12, 1942) was an American attorney who served as an Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court from October 1, 1937 to October 12, 1942.

Biography[edit]

Houser was born to Justus Christian Houser and Martha Rodman in Jones County, Iowa.[1] He moved to Los Angeles to read law in the offices of Stephen M. White.[1] Houser continued his studies as one of the founding signatures to the University of Southern California Law School, and graduated in the first class of 1900.[2][3]

In November 1902, Houser was nominated by the Republican Party and was elected an Assemblyman from the 74th district in the California State Assembly.[4][5]

In November 1906, Houser ran as a Republican and was elected as a Judge in the Los Angeles County Superior Court.[6][7][8][9] In 1911, the Los Angeles trial bench included future Supreme Court justices Frank G. Finlayson, Nathaniel P. Conrey, and Curtis D. Wilbur.[10] In 1912, he was re-elected to a six-year term on the trial bench.[11][12][13] In 1916, he was presiding judge of the Superior Court.[14] In 1918, he won another election for a new term on the Superior Court.[15][16]

In 1923, he became an Associate Justice in the California Court of Appeal, Second District, Division One.[17] He held his seat until 1935 when he was named the Presiding Justice of that Court.[18]

In November 1926, he ran unsuccessfully for the California Supreme Court, losing to Jesse W. Curtis Sr. and William Langdon.[19][20] From 1935, Houser served as a member of the California Judicial Council.

In 1937, Governor Frank Merriman appointed Houser an Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court. In November 1938, he was retained in the election.[21][1][22] He remained on the high court until his death on October 12, 1942.[23] In December 1942, Governor Culbert Olson appointed B. Rey Schauer to the remainder of Houser's term.[24]

Personal life[edit]

At USC, he met his wife, Sara Isabel Wilde, who was also a founding signature for the school.[23] They had two children, Frederick F. Houser, who became Lt. Governor of California and a judge, and Rodman Wilde Houser.[23][25][26]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Justices Ask Vote for Re-Election". Madera Tribune (152). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 28 October 1938. p. 6. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  2. ^ "Law Students Organize". Los Angeles Herald (26 (256)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 13 June 1897. p. 12. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Law School Students" (25 (148)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 25 February 1898. p. 6. Retrieved August 11, 2017. Chairman of the evening, Frederick W. Houser 
  4. ^ "James Meredith Beaten, Flint-Otis Candidate Defeated in the Seventy-fourth". Los Angeles Herald (322). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 21 August 1902. p. 4. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  5. ^ "Republican Ticket Los Angeles County". Los Angeles Herald (18). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 20 October 1902. p. 7. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  6. ^ "Now What Do You Think of This". San Francisco Call (100 (84)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 23 August 1906. p. 3. Retrieved August 11, 2017. The nomination of five candidates for positions ' on the Superior bench was disposed of quickly and in one ballot and resulted in the selection of...former Assemblyman Frederick W. Houser 
  7. ^ "Law Alumni Indorse Houser". Los Angeles Herald (34 (36)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 6 November 1906. p. 4. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  8. ^ "Complete Official Election Returns". Sacramento Union (114). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 16 December 1906. p. 12. Retrieved August 12, 2017. 
  9. ^ "Challenges Vote of Soldiers' Home, Milton K. Young Believes Ballots Illegal, Files Suit, Alleging Election Frauds, and Recount May Show His Election as Superior Judge". Los Angeles Herald (34 (82)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 22 December 1906. p. 12. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  10. ^ "New Rules Adopted to Regulate Court". Los Angeles Herald (256). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 14 June 1911. p. 7. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  11. ^ "Judge Houser Files Renomination Petition". Los Angeles Herald (261). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 27 July 1912. p. 1. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  12. ^ "Records and Ability Give Five Judgeship Candidates Leading Place in Campaign" (27). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 1 November 1912. p. 13. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  13. ^ "Roosevelt is 18,000 in the Lead in LA County, Result of the Judicial Vote". Los Angeles Herald (32). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 7 November 1912. p. 2. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  14. ^ "Neglect of Duty Is Charged to 'Prosecutor in Liquor Confiscation". Sacramento Union (32). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 1 June 1916. p. 1. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  15. ^ "Frederick Houser in Race for Judge". Los Angeles Herald (208). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 2 July 1918. p. 5. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  16. ^ "List of Successful Candidates". Los Angeles Herald (4). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 6 November 1918. p. 1. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  17. ^ "318 Seek State and District Offices". Sacramento Union (26066). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 29 July 1922. p. 7. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  18. ^ Johnson, J. Edward (1966). History of the California Supreme Court: The Justices 1900-1950, vol 2 (PDF). San Francisco, CA: Bancroft-Whitney. pp. 157–160. Retrieved August 14, 2017. 
  19. ^ "Dissension Shown Over Labor's Endorsement of Robert M. Clarke, Curtis Again Has Opposition". San Bernardino Sun (58 (147)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 25 July 1926. p. 10. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  20. ^ "California's Republicans in a Landslide". San Bernardino Sun (59 (64)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 3 November 1926. p. 2. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  21. ^ In 1934, the state implemented the present system of gubernatorial appointment with retention elections, replacing the direct election of justices.
  22. ^ "60,625 Votes, a Record, Cast at Polls". San Bernardino Sun (45). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 30 November 1938. p. 19. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  23. ^ a b c "Death Claims Distinguished State Jurist". San Bernardino Sun (49). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 13 October 1942. p. 1. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  24. ^ "Named Justice". Madera Tribune (245). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 17 December 1942. p. 1. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  25. ^ "Houser and Hagerty Win G.O.P. Assembly Support". San Bernardino Sun (48). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 25 May 1942. p. 1. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 
  26. ^ "Lt. Gov. Fred Houser Announces His Candidacy for United States Senator". Desert Sun (12). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 19 October 1945. p. 16. Retrieved August 11, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Ira F. Thompson
Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court
1937–1942
Succeeded by
B. Rey Schauer
Preceded by
Presiding Justice of the California Court of Appeal, Second District, Division One
1935–1937
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Assemblyman from the 74th district in the California State Assembly
January 1903–March 1903
Succeeded by