Freedom (Jimi Hendrix song)

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"Freedom"
Freedom single picture sleeve.jpg
Italian single picture sleeve
Single by Jimi Hendrix
from the album The Cry of Love
B-side"Angel"
ReleasedMarch 8, 1971 (1971-03-08)
Format7-inch 45 rpm record
RecordedJune–August 1970
StudioElectric Lady, New York City
GenreRock, funk
Length3:24
LabelReprise
Songwriter(s)Jimi Hendrix
Producer(s)
Hendrix US singles chronology
"Stepping Stone"
(1970)
"Freedom"
(1971)
"Dolly Dagger"
(1971)

"Freedom" is a funk-rock song by Jimi Hendrix that is often seen as one of the most fully realized pieces he wrote and recorded in the months before his death.[1] It incorporates several musical styles and the lyrics touch upon his relationship with Devon Wilson and her heroin addiction:[1]

You know you hooked my girlfriend,
You know the drugstore man
Well I don't need it now,
I'm just tryin' to slap it out of her hand!
Freedom! So I can live![2]

The song is one of the post-Band of Gypsys developed numbers that Hendrix regurlarly performed in concert.[3][4] In 1971, "Freedom" was used as the opening track on The Cry of Love. In the US, the song was also released as a single and was only one of two posthumous Hendrix singles to appear on the Billboard Hot 100, where it reached number 59.[5]

"Freedom" is now one of the more popular songs in the Hendrix collection and is included on several compilations. In 1997, it was used to lead off First Rays of the New Rising Sun, the most comprehensive attempt to present Hendrix's planned fourth studio album.[3]

Other releases of "Freedom" include:

Demos

Performances

Compilations

Notes[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ a b McDermott, Kramer & Cox 2009, p. 211.
  2. ^ Hendrix 2003, p. 62.
  3. ^ a b McDermott 1997, p. 5.
  4. ^ Others include "Dolly Dagger", "Hey Baby", "In from the Storm", and "Straight Ahead". McDermott, Kramer, Cox; 2009, pages 207–208, 211–215.
  5. ^ "Jimi Hendrix: Chart History – Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved April 21, 2019.
  6. ^ McDermott 2000.
  7. ^ McDermott 2010.
  8. ^ McDermott 2002.
  9. ^ Loder 2001.

References