Andrew Yang 2020 presidential campaign

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Freedom Dividend)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Andrew Yang 2020 presidential campaign
Andrew Yang 2020 logo.svg
Campaign2020 United States presidential election (Democratic Party primaries)
CandidateAndrew Yang
Entrepreneur
Founder of Venture for America
AffiliationDemocratic Party
LaunchedNovember 6, 2017
HeadquartersNew York City, New York[1]
Key peopleZach Graumann (Campaign Manager)[2]
Muhan Zhang (Chief Operating Officer)[2]
Nick Ryan (Campaign Chief)[2]
Jared Volz (Deputy Campaign Manager)[2]
Randy Jones (Political Director)[2]
Drew Corbitt (Director of Distributed Organizing)[2]
Shaun Looney (Director of Distributed Organizing)[2]
Zach Fang (Field Director)[2]
Matthew Shinners (Communications Director)[2]
Madalin Sammons (Communications Director)[2]
Rachel Barnhart (Deputy Press Secretary)[2]
Hilary Kinney (Deputy Press Secretary)[2]
SloganHumanity First
Not Left, Not Right, Forward
Make America Think Harder
A New Way Forward
Math button blue.png
Website
www.yang2020.com

The 2020 presidential campaign of Andrew Yang, an attorney, entrepreneur, and the founder of Venture for America, began on November 6, 2017, when Yang filed with the Federal Election Commission to participate in the Democratic primaries. In April 2018, he released The War on Normal People, a book discussing job displacement, automation, and universal basic income (UBI), which are central to his campaign.

Initially considered a longshot candidate, Yang gained significant support in early 2019 after appearing on the popular podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience. He has since appeared in numerous other podcasts, shows, and interviews. Yang participated in the first four Democratic primary debates, which took place in June, July, September and October 2019, and he qualified for the November debate. His campaign raised $10 million in the third quarter of 2019, up from $1.7 million and $2.8 million in the first and second quarters, respectively.

Yang's unorthodox campaign strategy and platform have attracted attention, especially for his heavy reliance upon Internet-based campaigning. Central to his campaign is the idea of a "Freedom Dividend", a UBI of $1,000 a month to every American adult. The other two pillars of Yang's campaign are "Medicare for All" and "Human-Centered Capitalism". The main focus of Yang's campaign is the issue of the displacement of American workers through automation, a problem Yang claims was a major reason Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election. More than 160 policy proposals are listed on Yang's website.

Background[edit]

Yang graduated from Brown University in 1996, concentrating in economics and political science.[3] He then attended Columbia Law School, earning a Juris Doctor in 1999.[4] In 2011, Yang founded Venture for America (VFA), a nonprofit organization that encourages entrepreneurship by matching recent college graduates with startups in various cities across the United States.[5] In 2012, President Barack Obama recognized Yang as a "Champion of Change" for his work with VFA.[6] In 2015, Obama further recognized Yang as a "Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship".[7] Yang stepped down as VFA's leader in March 2017.[8]

Yang has stated that he first took an interest in universal basic income (UBI) after reading Martin Ford's book Rise of the Robots. Andy Stern's book, Raising the Floor, further persuaded Yang to support UBI.[9][10]

Campaign[edit]

Yang is holding a microphone while gesturing and making a speech. His book, The War on Normal People, is displayed on a table in front of him.
Yang makes a speech in New Hampshire in January 2019. His book, The War on Normal People, is displayed.

Yang's candidacy began on November 6, 2017, when he filed with the Federal Election Commission to participate in the Democratic primaries.[1] The campaign began with a small initial staff working out of an apartment owned by Yang's mother.[11] He is running on the slogan "Humanity First".[12] According to BBC, Yang "is one of the first and most recognizable East Asian-Americans in history to run for president".[13] He has stated that he hopes his "campaign can inspire Asian Americans to be engaged in politics."[14] If nominated, he would become the first Asian American to serve as any major party's presidential candidate, and if elected, he would become the first Asian-American president.[15]

On April 3, 2018, Yang released The War on Normal People, a book discussing technological change, automation, job displacement, the economy, and the need for a UBI.[16] In a press release on April 19, 2018, he announced that he would be personally giving one resident of New Hampshire $1,000 per month in 2019 to show the effectiveness of his UBI policy, the "Freedom Dividend".[17] He announced that he would do the same thing in Iowa in 2019.[18] On August 10, 2018, Yang was a keynote speaker at the largest Democratic fundraiser in Iowa, the Iowa Democratic Wing Ding.[19] In 2018, he made seven trips to Iowa and six trips to New Hampshire, the first two states to vote in the primaries.[20][21][22][23]

2019[edit]

First and second quarters[edit]

In early 2019, Yang's campaign was called a "longshot" by several media outlets, including Fox News,[24] Washington Examiner,[25] and Vox;[26] Yang soon appeared on several noted outlets and podcasts, including The Joe Rogan Experience, The Breakfast Club,[27] The Ben Shapiro Show,[28] and Tucker Carlson Tonight.[29] Yang's appearance on The Joe Rogan Experience has been credited as a major turning point in his campaign.[30][31][32] Several media sources have also attributed Yang's rise in notability to his large group of online supporters, who informally refer to themselves as the Yang Gang and have made a large number of Internet memes about Yang and his campaign.[33][34]

Yang holding a microphone while making a speech.
Yang speaks with attendees at the 2019 Iowa Democratic Wing Ding at Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa.

Following his sudden rise in notability, Yang attracted the interest of some prominent alt-right figures and many users of /pol/, a forum on 4chan that is notorious for its alt-right politics.[35][36] Yang himself has denounced any support from the alt-right.[37] In an interview with The New York Times, Yang said that he is "getting support from quarters [he] wouldn't have expected"; regarding support from the alt-right in particular, he said "It's uncomfortable. They're antithetical to everything I stand for."[34] Yang has stated that he was confused by the support he has from the alt-right, because he doesn't "look much like a white nationalist".[38]

On March 8, Yang discussed his proposals, including the Freedom Dividend, Medicare for All, and "the American scorecard", at a rally in Austin, Texas.[39] On March 15, he spoke about the Freedom Dividend at a rally in San Francisco.[40] On April 10, Yang discussed the Freedom Dividend, automation, and a "new benchmark for economic health" at a rally in Boston.[41] On April 14, he appeared on a CNN town hall to talk about the Freedom Dividend, monitoring malicious speech, legalizing marijuana, and decriminalizing certain opiates.[42] On April 16, he spoke at a rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Business Insider noted that he was engaging with the audience throughout.[43] On April 18, Yang discussed topics including voter rights, election security, and abortion at a rally in Atlanta.[44] On April 22, he spoke about the Freedom Dividend in a rally in Los Angeles.[45] On April 23, he discussed the Freedom Dividend, environmental protection, and job displacement through automation at a rally in Las Vegas.[46]

On May 3, Yang spoke about the Freedom Dividend and job displacement at a rally in Seattle.[47] On May 4, Yang discussed automation, the Freedom Dividend, Medicare for All, and "Human-Centered Capitalism" at a rally in Detroit.[48] On May 5, Yang spoke at a rally in Minneapolis.[49][50] The same day, he appeared on The Today Show, discussing the economy, automation, and the Freedom Dividend.[51] On May 14, he discussed the Freedom Dividend, automation, and Donald Trump voters at a rally in New York City.[52] On June 4, Yang spoke about his three main policies—the Freedom Dividend, Medicare for All, and Human-Centered Capitalism—in an interview with Bloomberg Politics.[53] On June 7, he appeared on Real Time with Bill Maher, discussing job displacement caused by automation and identity politics.[54] On June 17, Yang discussed issues affecting low-income Americans at the Poor People's Campaign Presidential Forum.[55][56] On June 18, he appeared on MSNBC's MTP Daily to discuss automation, the Freedom Dividend, the economy, and foreign policy.[57] On June 21 and 22,[58] Yang spoke at two forums in South Carolina—the South Carolina Democratic Party convention[59] and the "We Decide: 2020 Election Membership Forum".[60] He discussed various topics, including the Freedom Dividend, abortion, and reproductive health care.[58][61] On June 25, he went on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to talk about topics including the Freedom Dividend, automation, and free marriage counseling.[62][63]

Third quarter[edit]

Yang is holding a microphone while making a speech.
Yang speaking at an event in Des Moines, Iowa in August 2019

On July 8, Yang appeared on The View to discuss the retail and manufacturing industries, the Freedom Dividend, the economy, and various social subtopics.[64] On July 13, he discussed the Freedom Dividend at a rally in Portland, Oregon.[65] On July 19, Yang spoke at a forum in Iowa co-hosted by the AARP and The Des Moines Register.[66] He talked about issues affecting older voters in Iowa—including high drug prices, the lack of avenues for holistic treatments, low retirement savings, and age discrimination—as well as solutions, including the Freedom Dividend, improving financial literacy, and legalizing marijuana.[67] On July 25, Yang was interviewed by Trevor Noah on The Daily Show, discussing the Freedom Dividend, automation, and the economy.[68] On July 28, he spoke about his campaign and the Freedom Dividend on Fox News Sunday.[69]

Yang speaks with a media reporter. There are several people and camera crew around.
Yang speaking with the media at the 2019 Iowa State Fair in Des Moines

On August 2, Yang talked about the Freedom Dividend, automation, and climate change on Velshi & Ruhle.[70] Following two mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, he offered condolences and advocated for "common sense gun safety laws".[71] On August 7, he appeared on the H3 Podcast, discussing gun control, the Freedom Dividend, automation, and the economy.[72] On August 9, Yang spoke at the Des Moines Register Political Soapbox at the Iowa State Fair.[73] He discussed the Freedom Dividend, "highlighted the technological advances in Iowa", and proposed to make Tax Day a national holiday.[74][75] During the Presidential Gun Sense Forum hosted by Everytown for Gun Safety in Des Moines, Iowa on August 10, Yang "became visibly emotional when discussing gun violence prevention with a woman who said she lost her daughter to a stray bullet".[76] The story was reported by numerous media outlets, including The Independent,[77] The Hill,[78] and Washington Examiner.[79] Writing for CNN, Chris Cillizza praised Yang, saying that Yang's crying "is a good thing. I've long advocated that politicians showing emotion is something we need more of (not less of) in our politics and our culture."[80]

Yang is holding a microphone while making a speech. Two moderators are sitting nearby.
Yang making a speech at the Presidential Gun Sense Forum hosted by Everytown for Gun Safety and Moms Demand Action at the Iowa Events Center in Des Moines

On August 12, Yang appeared on Anderson Cooper 360°, discussing gun control, lobbying in the US government, and "democracy dollars"—Yang's proposal of an annual grant of $100 for every US adult that can only be spent on candidates and campaigns that would drown out corporate money from organizations, such as the NRA, by a factor of eight to one.[81] On August 15, he visited the South Carolina Lowcountry to speak about the Freedom Dividend, as well as "immigration, gun control, health care, and protecting American jobs".[82] On August 16, Yang visited Plaistow, New Hampshire to discuss topics including the Freedom Dividend, automation, the economy, and various subtopics.[83] On August 18, he appeared on Face the Nation to discuss foreign policy, automation, and the Freedom Dividend.[84][85] On August 19, Yang appeared on The NPR Politics Podcast to talk about a wide range of topics, including attracting Donald Trump voters, Asian identity, and climate change.[86] On August 23, he spoke at the summer meeting of the Democratic National Committee (DNC), discussing automation, job displacement, the economy, and the Freedom Dividend.[87][88] On August 26, Yang released his climate change plan, which involved nuclear power, zero-emission transportation, geoengineering, a carbon tax, and a renewable electric grid.[89][90] On August 29, he appeared on Cuomo Prime Time to discuss the Freedom Dividend, immigration, and automation.[91]

Yang making a speech
Yang making a speech at the New Hampshire Democratic Party Convention in September 2019

On September 4, Yang appeared on the CNN Climate Crisis Town Hall to discuss global warming and climate change. He proposed several solutions, including rejoining the Paris Agreement; adding environmental indicators to economic measurements; implementing democracy dollars, the Freedom Dividend, and a carbon tax; and funding thorium-based nuclear power plants.[92] On September 5, Yang appeared on CBS This Morning to talk about his campaign and debate performances, the American Dream, automation, and the Freedom Dividend.[93] On September 7, he spoke about automation, the economy, job displacement, and the Freedom Dividend at the New Hampshire Democratic Party Convention.[94] On September 8, Yang was one of only three Democratic candidates to speak at the AAPI Democratic Presidential Forum. He discussed issues affecting Asian Pacific Americans, including health care, "immigration, the economy and income inequality, as well as the rising influence of Asian Americans as a voting bloc".[95] On September 12 before the third Democratic debate, he appeared on The Daily to discuss automation and the Freedom Dividend.[96]

Yang is holding a microphone while gesturing and making a speech
Yang making a speech at "Youth Voice: The Iowa Caucus", a presidential candidate forum hosted in September 2019 at Roosevelt High School in Des Moines

On September 15, Yang appeared on State of the Union, talking about his proposal during the third debate to give Freedom Dividends to 10 American families, and racism against Asian Americans.[97] The same day, he appeared on Ryan Higa's Off the Pill podcast to discuss the Freedom Dividend, democracy dollars, climate change, and foreign policy.[98] On September 16, Yang spoke about the economy and the Freedom Dividend at a rally in Boston.[99] On September 17, he discussed union workers and "key labor issues" at the Workers’ Presidential Summit hosted by the Philadelphia Council AFL–CIO.[100] The same day, he made a general-election pitch at a rally in Philadelphia.[101] On September 19, Yang appeared on the FiveThirtyEight Politics podcast to discuss "his campaign strategy, internal polling", and the Freedom Dividend.[102] The same day, he spoke about solutions to climate change during MSNBC's Climate Forum.[103] On September 20, Yang appeared on Late Night with Seth Meyers to discuss his campaign, the Freedom Dividend, and Human-Centered Capitalism.[104] The same day, he appeared on Firing Line with Margaret Hoover to discuss automation, the economy, the Freedom Dividend, and Human-Centered Capitalism.[105] On September 21, Yang attended the Iowa steak fry,[106] and spoke about the Freedom Dividend and access to health care during an interview with NowThis News.[107] The same day, he appeared on The Van Jones Show, discussing topics including the Freedom Dividend, Donald Trump, and racial identity.[108]

Yang is in the middle of giving a volunteer a high-five.
Yang giving a volunteer a high five at "Youth Voice: The Iowa Caucus" in September 2019 at Roosevelt High School in Des Moines

On September 22, Yang spoke about "issues important to students and young voters" at "Youth Voice: The Iowa Caucus" in Iowa.[109] The same day, his campaign opened two campaign offices in Des Moines and Davenport, Iowa.[110] He also joined Krystal Ball on Rising (hosted by The Hill), discussing topics including his campaign, the Freedom Dividend, Human-Centered Capitalism, drug decriminalization, and labor union rights.[111] On September 24, Yang appeared on The Rachel Maddow Show to discuss the potential impeachment of Donald Trump, campaign polling, and the issues that got Trump elected.[112] On September 26, he again appeared on The View,[113] and also visited Peterborough, New Hampshire to discuss job displacement through automation and the Freedom Dividend.[114] On September 30, he spoke about automation and the Freedom Dividend at a rally in Los Angeles.[115]

Fourth quarter[edit]

On October 1, Yang appeared on The Real to discuss the Freedom Dividend, health care, and job displacement.[a] On October 2, he appeared on Speakeasy with John Harwood to discuss his campaign, the economy, capitalism, and the Freedom Dividend.[119] The same day, he spoke at MSNBC's Gun Safety Forum in Las Vegas and offered several solutions: democracy dollars to counter gun lobby influence, the Freedom Dividend to "reduce gun violence by reducing economic pressure on households", and "divesting from policing and prisons and reinvesting in communities hit by gun violence".[120] On October 5, Yang attended the Blue Jamboree rally in North Charleston, South Carolina, "speaking to voters on a number of issues affecting the state".[121] On October 7, he was interviewed by Alyssa Milano on her podcast Sorry Not Sorry to discuss topics including education, Freedom Dividend, Human-Centered Capitalism, infrastructure, and health care.[122] On October 9, Yang talked with Eric Weinstein on his podcast, The Portal.[123] On October 11, he appeared on The Dr. Oz Show to discuss his campaign, mental health issues, health care, and the Freedom Dividend.[124] On October 13, Yang appeared on CBS News Sunday Morning to talk about job displacement, the economy, and the Freedom Dividend.[125] The same day, he spoke about automation, the economy, and the Freedom Dividend at the Ohio Democratic Party's State Dinner fundraiser.[126][127]

A crowd of Yang supporters, many of whom are holding signs and banners
Supporters form a crowd at the Liberty and Justice Celebration in Des Moines. Yang is visible in the background.

On October 16, Yang appeared in a post-debate interview on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer.[128] On October 17, he appeared on The Rachel Maddow Show to discuss impeachment, foreign policy, and UBI.[129][130] On October 18, he conducted a ten-hour Q&A session through several online platforms, including a live stream, Reddit, and Twitter.[131] On October 19, he discussed the Freedom Dividend and climate change in an interview with NPR.[132][133] On October 21, Yang spoke about his "Humanity First" platform, as well as the Freedom Dividend, Human-Centered Capitalism, and "his views on the mounting crisis of the automation of labor", at a National Press Club event.[134][135] The same day, he was interviewed by Robert Costa of The Washington Post, talking about his campaign, the Freedom Dividend, Medicare for All, foreign policy, and various subtopics.[136] On October 23, Yang spoke at a town hall in New Hampshire.[137] On October 24, he appeared in a town hall hosted by WGBH News.[138] On October 26, he discussed issues facing Nevada voters at the Nevada Presidential People's Forum.[139] On October 27, he spoke at a rally in San Francisco.[140] On October 29, Yang was interviewed by CNN's Don Lemon, discussing impeachment and his campaign.[141] On October 31, he appeared on WQHT ("HOT 97") to discuss his views on recent events and clarify policy positions.[142]

On November 1, Yang hosted a campaign rally in Des Moines, during which Rivers Cuomo and Scott Shriner of Weezer performed several songs.[143] The same day, he spoke at the Liberty and Justice Celebration in Des Moines.[144] On November 2, he opened a new office in Iowa City,[145] and spoke at an NAACP forum in Des Moines and a disability forum in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.[146][147] On November 3, Yang and his wife, Evelyn, appeared in a joint interview on State of the Union.[148] The same day, he discussed the Freedom Dividend, health care, and impeachment on Meet the Press.[149] On November 4, Yang spoke at a rally at George Mason University in Virginia.[150] On November 7, he appeared on a forum hosted by New Hampshire Public Radio.[151] On November 8, he appeared on CNN's New Day to discuss Michael Bloomberg's potential entry into the 2020 race.[152] On November 14, Yang wrote an opinion piece on The New York Times discussing job displacement and the effects of automation. He offers the Freedom Dividend and Human-Centered Capitalism as solutions to automation.[153] On November 16, he spoke at the California Democratic Party State Convention.[154]

Fundraising[edit]

Yang holding a microphone while making a speech.
Yang speaks with attendees at a fundraiser hosted by the Iowa Asian and Latino Coalition at Jasper Winery in Des Moines, Iowa.

On March 11, 2019, Yang announced on Twitter that he surpassed the fundraising threshold of 65,000 donors, which qualified him to participate in the first round of Democratic primary debates.[155] On June 28, Yang announced that he reached 130,000 donors,[156] which met the fundraising criterion for the third round of Democratic primary debates.[157]

In the first quarter of 2019, Yang raised $1.7 million, of which more than $250,000 came from "the last four days of the quarter".[158] According to Yang's campaign, "the average donation was $17.92", and "99% of the donations were less than $200".[158] In the second quarter, Yang raised $2.8M, an increase of $1.1M from the first quarter.[159] The campaign stated that 99.6% "of its donors were small-dollar donors [who] gave less than $200".[159] On August 6, Yang's third-quarter fundraising reached $2M,[160] which increased to $2.8M on August 13, matching his total second-quarter fundraising.[161] On August 15, he reached 200,000 unique donors.[162] On August 17, Yang announced that among his campaign donors, "the most common jobs are software engineers, teachers, drivers, retail workers and warehouse workers" and the "biggest employer is the US Army".[163] On September 1, he announced that the average donation was $25, and that the campaign had received no corporate political action committee (PAC) money.[164] In the 72 hours after the third debate (held in mid-September), Yang's campaign raised $1 million, suggesting that it "is on track to raise significantly more in the third quarter" than in the second quarter, according to Politico.[165]

In the third quarter, Yang's campaign raised $10M, representing a 257% quarterly increase—the largest growth rate among the fundraising numbers of all candidates.[166] The average donation was around $30, and 99% of the donations were $200 or less.[167] According to The Washington Post, the campaign has raised a total of $15.2M and ranks first among all candidates "in percent of money coming from small-dollar donations".[168]

In mid-October 2019, the creators of a new super PAC, called Math PAC, announced that they would be spending over $1 million to back Yang's campaign "so that a first-time candidate's voice isn't drowned out". Vox notes that it will be "a test for the candidate, who says he wants to eliminate super PACs".[169]

Yang Gang[edit]

Supporters of Yang's campaign.
Supporters of Yang's campaign are collectively known as the Yang Gang or #YangGang.[170]

Followers of Yang's campaign are collectively known as the Yang Gang or #YangGang.[170] They have brought attention to his campaign on Reddit, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and other social media platforms, through the use of Internet memes and viral campaigning.[171][172][173] Media outlets have noted that much of the content circulated through these platforms—including memes, GIFs, podcasts, and Twitter tweets—have been instrumental to the campaign.[174][175] According to Mother Jones, Yang's supporters have coordinated on platforms such as Discord and Reddit in order to boost Yang on online surveys hosted by various websites, including the Drudge Report and Washington Examiner.[176] According to Iowa Starting Line, Yang has been able to attract former Republicans, Independents, and Libertarians, and Yang believes that "he could build a much broader coalition to beat Trump in 2020 than anyone else in the field".[177]

On October 26, 2019, a march for UBI took place in New York City, and many of Yang's supporters attended.[178][179] In South Carolina, there are more than 30 organized supporter groups, according to CBS News.[180] In California, students and alumni from San Diego State University and the University of California, San Diego have participated in canvassing events for Yang's campaign.[181]

Criticism of media coverage[edit]

Supporters of Yang's campaign raising signs that say "Andrew Yang for President".
Yang supporters in New Hampshire

On multiple occasions, Yang's campaign and supporters have criticized media outlets, such as MSNBC and CNN, for their coverage of Yang. Incidents include cases of news outlets excluding Yang from lists of 2020 Democratic candidates or failing to mention Yang completely.[182][183][184] On August 29, 2019, Yang supporters prompted the hashtag #YangMediaBlackout to trend on Twitter after a CNN infographic displaying the results of a poll included Democratic candidate Beto O'Rourke but not Yang, even though the poll showed Yang polling three times higher than O'Rourke. Yang supporters have also criticized media outlets for providing disproportionately low coverage of Yang, pointing out that according to The New York Times, he has received some of the least coverage in cable news among the candidates, even though he was polling better than most of the field.[185][186][187]

On September 5, Yang tweeted that "Sometimes honest mistakes happen. But NBC and MSNBC seem to omit me on the regular." He also provided several examples of omissions.[188] In an evening broadcast on September 9, MSNBC misidentified him as "John Yang". The next day, Yang responded on Twitter, saying "John Yang? That's a new one."[189] The incident prompted the hashtag #WhoIsJohnYang to trend on Twitter.[190] In early October, Yang called out CNN and MSNBC for excluding him in two fundraising graphics.[191]

Yang posing for a selfie with two supporters.
Yang poses for a selfie with supporters in September 2019 at Roosevelt High School in Des Moines

In early September, Yang's media coverage discrepancy was reported by several media outlets, including CNN.[192] Axios noted that while Yang polling in the top six of the Democratic primary and "getting plenty of online attention", he was "being treated by the media like a bottom-tier candidate".[193] Krystal Ball of The Hill observed that there was "a persistent pattern of ignoring Yang's candidacy" among media outlets such as CNN. Ball further noted that Scott Santens, one of Yang's supporters, "has been keeping track of the apparent slights via Twitter".[194] On October 23, 2019, Santens released an article compiling the mainstream media's exclusions of Yang.[195] In November 2019, Yang's campaign manager dismissed an apology by MSNBC for leaving Yang off of an infographic, which according to Santens's compilation, was the 15th time in the campaign cycle MSNBC or its related networks had wrongfully excluded Yang.[196][197]

Democratic primary debates[edit]

First debate[edit]

A blue button with the capital letters, "MATH".
"MATH", which stands for Make America Think Harder, is one of Yang's campaign slogans.

In qualifying for the first Democratic primary debate, Yang met the 65,000 donor criterion on March 11, 2019.[198] He also met the polling criterion, with 18 polls at 1% or higher.[199]

The Democratic National Committee determined at random that Yang would participate in the second night of the first debate, which took place in Miami on June 27.[200][201] During the debate, Yang was asked only two questions. He had the least airtime of any candidate on both nights, speaking for a total of only two minutes and 56 seconds, which was less than one-fourth that of former vice president Joe Biden.[202][203]

After the debate, Yang, along with fellow candidates Marianne Williamson and Eric Swalwell, complained of microphone issues not allowing them to speak unless called upon when other candidates seemed to be able to freely interject at all times, though NBC denied the claim.[204] The issues spurred frustration from Yang supporters and prompted #LetYangSpeak to trend on Twitter much of the following day.[205] An NBC spokesperson said, "At no point during the debate was any candidate's microphone turned off or muted",[206][207] but Yang and his supporters have provided video evidence they claim shows Yang speaking up but not being heard.[208]

Second debate[edit]

The criteria for qualifying for the second debates were the same as for the first debates.[209] Yang was assigned to participate in the second night of the second debate, which took place in Detroit on July 31.[210][211]

During the debate, Yang answered questions on topics including civil rights, health care, immigration, party strategy, climate, and the economy.[212] Yang spoke for a total of 8.7 minutes, which was again the least time of any candidate on both nights.[213] He was the only second-night candidate who did not spend any time in "back-and-forths" with other candidates.[213] Yang drew attention for his decision to not wear a necktie in either debate.[214][215] In his closing statement, Yang called out the media and the debate format, saying:[216][217][218]

You know what the talking heads couldn't stop talking about after the last debate? It's not the fact that I'm somehow number four on the stage in national polling. It was the fact that I wasn't wearing a tie. Instead of talking about automation and our future, including the fact that we automated away 4 million manufacturing jobs—hundreds of thousands right here in Michigan—we're up here with makeup on our faces and our rehearsed attack lines, playing roles in this reality TV show. It's one reason why we elected a reality TV star as our president! We need to be laser-focused on solving the real challenges of today, like the fact that the most common jobs in America may not exist in a decade, or that most Americans cannot pay their bills. My flagship proposal, the Freedom Dividend, would put one thousand dollars into the hands of every American adult. It would be a game-changer for millions of American families. If you care more about your family and your kids more than my neckwear, enter your zip code at yang2020.com and see what a thousand dollars would mean to your community! I have done the math. It's not left, it's not right, it's forward—and that is how we're going to beat Donald Trump in 2020.

In a September interview with Politico, Yang further clarified his stance on candidates attacking each other at the debates. According to Yang, there "is this sense of manufactured outrage and rehearsed attack lines", and as "a proxy for the American public", he finds "the process to be very false and somewhat misdirected".[219]

"It's not left, it's not right, it's forward" has been compared to a similar slogan used by the Green Party of Canada.[220]

Third debate[edit]

To qualify for the third round of debates, "candidates are required to both have 130,000 unique donors and register at least 2 percent support in four polls".[221] On June 28, Yang reached 130,000 donors, thus meeting the fundraising criterion.[156]

After Yang had received what he considered to be his fourth qualifying poll, the DNC revealed that qualifying polls conducted by different organizations would not be counted separately if they were sponsored by the same DNC-approved sponsor. The ruling was controversially disclosed by the DNC on July 30, less than one day after Yang had obtained 2% in four polls, rather than on July 19 when the second of these polls had been completed.[222] In spite of this, Yang qualified for the third debate after receiving 2% support in his fourth qualifying poll on August 8.[221]

The third debate was held in Houston on September 12.[223] In his opening statement, Yang promised to "give a Freedom Dividend of $1000 a month for an entire year to 10 American families".[224] During the debate, he addressed topics including health care, immigration, foreign relations, the War on Terror, corporate lobbying, and education and charter schools.[225][226] Yang spoke for a total of 7 minutes 54 seconds, which was again the least time of any candidate.[227]

Some campaign-finance experts have questioned using campaign funds for payments such as those Yang promised in his opening statement, on the grounds that federal law bars personal use of campaign funds.[228] However, Yang has said he has consulted lawyers about the proposal and that "he would not gain the same scrutiny if he gave money to a media company or consultants" instead of directly to Americans.[97] On September 12, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian announced on Twitter his support for Yang's proposal and offered to finance it.[229] On September 13, tech entrepreneur Justin Sun pledged to give $1.2 million to 100 Americans in 2020, saying that he wanted "Yang to help him select the recipients".[230] In the 72 hours after the debate, Yang's campaign raised $1 million and collected "more than 450,000 email addresses from people who entered the online raffle", of which over 90% were new email addresses.[165]

Fourth debate[edit]

The qualification requirements for the fourth debate mirrored those of the third debate, and Yang qualified before August 22.[231] The debate was held on October 15 in Westerville, Ohio.[232] During the debate, Yang said that he supports the potential impeachment of President Trump, but believes it may not be successful and will not solve the issues that got Trump elected, such as job displacement through automation. He also discussed the economy, taxation, foreign policy, the opioid crisis, big tech, and personal data as a property right.[233] Yang spoke for a total of eight and a half minutes, which was the fourth-least time of all candidates.[234]

During the debate, Yang proposed decriminalizing opioids, a stance that candidate Beto O'Rourke agreed with.[235] Candidates Julian Castro and Tulsi Gabbard said that Yang's Freedom Dividend policy "was a good idea, and something they would consider if elected president", while candidate Cory Booker argued for a $15 minimum wage over UBI.[236] Vox called UBI one of the winners of the debate, saying that Yang's campaign "has already elevated the idea in [American] policy discourse".[237] Chris Cillizza of CNN called Yang one of the winners of the debate, observing that Yang has had a "remarkable rise in this race" and "is already having a significant impact on the conversation within the Democratic Party".[238] The New York Post similarly labeled Yang a winner, saying that he "knows how to break through by speaking like a regular person".[239] On Twitter, Meghan McCain praised Yang for starting the conversation on automation, calling it "incredibly impressive".[240]

Future debates[edit]

The fifth debate, which will be held on November 20,[241] requires candidates to have 165,000 unique donors and reach 3% or more in four polls approved by the DNC.[242] Yang reached the donor requirement prior to August 15.[162] He met the polling requirement on October 8, becoming the eighth candidate to qualify.[243]

He had also met the donor requirement for the December debate by August 15, but must still meet the polling requirements.[162][244]

Policies[edit]

Slogan and logo of Yang's campaign
More than 160 policies are listed on Yang's campaign website.[90][245]

Yang's platform has three main proposals: UBI, "Medicare for All", and "Human-Centered Capitalism".[246] His platform also includes numerous other proposals; more than 160 policies are listed on his campaign website.[90][245] Equal Citizens has given Yang's democracy reform policies an "A+" rating, as well as ranking him first place among all candidates, tied with fellow candidate Tulsi Gabbard.[247]

Yang claims the problem of job displacement through automation is the main reason Donald Trump ended up winning the 2016 presidential election, stating that based on data, "There's a straight line up between the adoption of industrial robots in a community and the movement towards Donald Trump."[248] Many of his policies, including the Freedom Dividend, are structured as a response to this issue.[10]

Freedom Dividend (UBI)[edit]

Yang's signature policy is the "Freedom Dividend", a $1,000-per-month universal basic income to all US citizens age 18 or older, regardless of employment status.[249][250] Yang has stated that this will help compensate for the loss of jobs to automation and artificial intelligence[251] and that it will foster "healthier people, less stressed out people, better educated people, stronger communities, more volunteerism, [and] more civic participation".[10] Citing forecasting by the Roosevelt Institute, Yang stated that the dividend "would create up to 2 million new jobs" in the US.[119] The dividend is opt-in,[252] and would not be given to those who choose to remain in certain welfare programs, such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, WIC, and Supplemental Security Income. Other programs would stack on top of the dividend, including Social Security, unemployment insurance, housing assistance, and veteran's disability benefits.[253]

Yang proposes funding the dividend—estimated to cost $2.8 trillion a year—through several avenues, including a 10% value-added tax on business transactions, a 0.1% tax on financial transactions, taxing capital gains and carried interest at normal income rates, a $40/ton carbon tax, and removing the wage cap on Social Security payroll tax.[254][b] According to Yang, a value-added tax is necessary to combat tax avoidance by major technology companies like Amazon and Google, which routinely use accounting tricks to pay little in income tax.[251][255] Yang expects "hundreds of billions in new economic growth and value" to be generated through the dividend and that it would save billions of dollars on incarceration, homelessness services, and emergency room health care.[10] On the topic of whether the dividend should include the wealthiest citizens, Yang stated that it should be universalized "so it's seen as a true right of citizenship, instead of a transfer from rich to poor".[255] Yang does not support raising the federal minimum wage but supports each state's right to do so, citing his belief that the Freedom Dividend renders a federal minimum wage increase less necessary.[256]

Fellow 2020 Democratic candidates Elizabeth Warren, Tulsi Gabbard, and Julian Castro have stated their openness to UBI.[236][257] At a 2019 conference organized by the Peterson Institute for International Economics, economist and Harvard professor Greg Mankiw said of the Freedom Dividend:

I am attracted to something along the lines of the policy now being championed by Andrew Yang ... It's pretty easy to see how this idea would work. Value-added taxes are essentially sales taxes; they're used in a lot of European nations, and they've proven remarkably efficient ways to raise revenue, and because the dividend is universal, it would be simple to administer.[258]

Skeptics of UBI cite a decrease in the growth of automation and doubt that the impacts of new technology will be negative.[259] According to the National Review's Rich Lowry, "as technology makes some jobs obsolete, it creates the space for new ones".[260] Contrarily, Yang has cited studies demonstrating that the retraining of displaced manufacturing workers had success rates of 0–15%.[261] The National Bureau of Economic Research estimates that the dividend would cost over $3 trillion annually (more than three-fourths of the federal budget),[c] and The Hill reports sentiments that low-income citizens would be the most negatively effected by its implementation. Yang's campaign points out that the dividend would decrease the amount of time spent "interacting with an unwieldy bureaucracy" and clarifies that the cost of basic necessities would not increase significantly, while the cost of luxury goods would. The Hill also cites economics professor Melissa Kearney, who states that UBI would not significantly reduce inequality, and that she has found "no compelling evidence that ... giving people money will generally lead to any appreciable increase in work or successful business creation".[262]

Human-Centered Capitalism[edit]

Yang has criticized several commonly cited economic metrics as misleading; for instance, he prefers labor force participation rate to the unemployment rate and believes that median income and life expectancy are more accurate at measuring the health of the economy than GDP.[250][255] According to Yang, the economy "systematically tends to undervalue many things, activities, and people, many of which are core to the human experience". His proposal, Human-Centered Capitalism, will include "measurements like Median Income and Standard of Living, Health-adjusted Life Expectancy, Mental Health, Childhood Success Rates, Social and Economic Mobility, Absence of Substance Abuse, and others". The policy aims to make "the economy work for Americans, not the other way around", direct "capital to investments to improve human welfare", and create "measurements around people, not dollars".[263]

In response to GDP having little or no influence on each citizen's well-being, Yang has proposed to create an "American Scorecard" to capture "the actual economic/well-being of the American people". He has listed several measurable indicators of well-being, including "Quality of life and health-adjusted life expectancy", "Happiness/Well-Being and Mental Health", "Environmental quality", "Income Inequality", and "Access to education". According to Yang, the American Scorecard will help set "policy goals against measurable indicators of well-being" and "measure progress on these goals".[264]

Economy[edit]

Yang promotes equal pay for equal work and wants to alleviate the racial discrepancies in pay.[265] He has also proposed to implement a mandatory paid-leave policy, which includes a minimum-leave policy for full-time workers and paid time away from work for contract workers.[266] According to Yang, "Americans often want to move for better job prospects but can't afford the costs." He wants to make it easier to move for work, and has proposed for the IRS "to create a program to refund up to $1,000 of moving expenses for any American relocating for work".[267]

Yang has proposed for personal data to be treated as a property right, saying: "Data generated by each individual needs to be owned by them, with certain rights conveyed that will allow them to know how it's used and protect it."[268] He opposes the deregulation of Wall Street, supports regulating social media as a public utility, and promotes a ban on robocalls.[250][269][270] Yang has proposed a new type of credit system designed to incentivize traditionally unpaid caregiving contributions.[270] He supports free financial counseling, stating that "it's important to ensure Americans have the knowledge they need to save and invest properly".[271]

Electoral reform[edit]

Democracy dollars[edit]

Yang supports the implementation of democracy dollars, where voting age citizens receive a $100 "use it or lose it" democracy voucher each year to give to candidates. The policy aims to drown out corporate money resulting from political lobbying and the decision of Citizens United v. FEC.[272][273] According to Yang, democracy dollars would drown out corporate money from organizations, such as the NRA, by a factor of eight to one.[81]

Partisan gerrymandering[edit]

Yang proposes to end partisan gerrymandering. According to Yang, gerrymandering "undercuts the basis of our representative democracy, and it causes people to believe their vote doesn't count". He aims to promote the use of "the efficiency gap to measure partisan gerrymandering when evaluating and drawing district maps". He also wants to use independent redistricting commissions and appoint "Supreme Court justices who support the use of sociological tools such as the efficiency gap to help end partisan gerrymandering".[274]

Ranked-choice voting[edit]

Yang supports ranked-choice voting: "each voter ranks their top three candidates. ... If one candidate received over 50% of the vote, they win the election. If no candidate hit the majority threshold, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. Then, everyone who listed that eliminated candidate as their first choice has their second choice considered, a process which continues until someone breaks 50%." Yang claims that ranked-choice voting will lead to higher voter turnout, better capture voter preferences, allow for more moderate candidates, and lower levels of negative campaigning. His policy aims to adopt a voting system that combats partisanship and "better captures the will of the majority of voters".[275]

Voting age[edit]

On April 3, 2019, Yang came out in favor of lowering the national voting age to 16. While other candidates have expressed openness towards the idea, Yang was the first to make it an official part of his platform.[276] Through lowering the voting age, Yang aims to increase civic engagement and allow citizens "to influence policy that impacts their economic futures".[277]

Energy and climate change[edit]

On August 26, 2019, Yang released his climate change plan, which involved nuclear power, zero-emission transportation, geoengineering, a carbon tax, and a renewable electric grid.[89][90] Yang supports a Green New Deal and favors a reduction in carbon emissions with an emphasis on climate engineering. In addition to revitalizing the Environmental Protection Agency, his platform calls for a Global Geoengineering Institute to form inter-governmental partnerships. Yang is a proponent of bringing the United States back into the Paris Climate Agreement.[278]

Nuclear energy[edit]

Yang is a supporter of nuclear energy. He believes that the US should invest more in nuclear technologies like thorium-based nuclear power and generation-IV nuclear reactors since they are safer and produce less waste than uranium-based nuclear energy. In his plan for energy transition to low-carbon sources, he plans to invest $50 billion in research and development and expects the first reactors to be connected to the grid by 2027.[89] He has also stated that he wants to make it easier for nuclear power plants to open up and wants to increase the amount of nuclear energy used in the US.[279]

Health care[edit]

In addition to UBI, single-payer health care is a fundamental aspect of Yang's platform.[251] Yang has clarified that while he supports Medicare for All, he "would keep the option of private insurance". His goal is to "demonstrate to the American people that private insurance is not what [they] need" and that Medicare for All is "superior to [their] current insurance".[280] He believes that such an approach will make holistic and preventive care more feasible. Yang's support for free health care goes beyond conventional physical care; for example, he supports free marriage counseling.[255] He has stated that the doctor shortage can be attributed to inadequate investment in patient care technology and an overemphasis on medical careers that require individuals to go through medical school.[281]

Yang has proposed increasing funding for the suicide prevention efforts of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the Department of Veterans Affairs. He supports the creation and funding of mindfulness programs in schools and correctional facilities.[282] He opposes circumcision and believes that history will show the intactivist movement to have been right. However, he would not try to ban the procedure and believes that the decision should ultimately be up to the parents, including for cultural or religious reasons.[283][284]

Abortion[edit]

Yang is pro-choice.[285] He supports "the right to privacy of American women" and the right for women "to choose in every circumstance and provide resources for planning and contraception". He has said that he would nominate pro-choice judges who "support a woman's right to choose".[285] He also believes that UBI will reduce abortions being performed for financial reasons.[286]

Corruption and bureaucracy[edit]

In a New York Times article about his campaign, several of Yang's policies about corruption and the federal bureaucracy are detailed, such as the creation of a "Department of the Attention Economy" that would focus on regulating the addictive nature of social media, the hiring of a White House Psychologist to focus on mental health issues, making Tax Day a national holiday, and, to stem corruption, increasing the salaries of federal regulators but limiting their private work after they leave public service.[287]

Drug policy[edit]

Yang supports the legalization of cannabis and the decriminalization of opioids (including heroin) for personal use, but he does not support legalizing or decriminalizing cocaine. He cited the drug policy of Portugal as evidence of the potential effectiveness of his drug policy.[288] If elected, he plans to pardon all prisoners serving sentences for low-level, non-violent marijuana offenses, and "would high five them on their way out of jail."[289]

Gun control[edit]

Yang's campaign website contains a detailed explanation of his gun control plan. He supports "common sense licensing policy" for firearms,[290] the restriction of the ability of people with a history of violence, domestic abuse, or violent mental illness to acquire firearms, and the grandfathering of current gun owners and the offering of a one-time "Good Gun Owner" tax credit. He also supports the prohibition of the manufacture and sale of bump stocks, suppressors, incendiary and explosive ammunition, and grenade launcher attachments, the implementation of a perpetual voluntary federal buyback program, and a tax credit for gun owners to upgrade their guns to personalized guns so children and teenagers do not potentially harm themselves or others with the gun. Yang supports law enforcement training that emphasizes the de-escalation of situations involving firearms.[291]

Yang has advocated for gun companies to "pay a fine when their product is used to kill an American" in order to realign incentives to deal with the problem of arms manufacturers' stocks going up after mass shootings.[292] He supports "an increase in the availability of mental health resources".[290] Yang calls the act of buying a gun and using it in a mass shooting "the last two steps" for a mass shooter and says we must also tackle the various steps that cause a shooter to buy and use a gun in a mass shooting in the first place.[293]

Yang has proposed ending active shooter drills in U.S. schools, or making them optional. He has argued that "the trauma and anxiety the process causes far outweigh the likelihood of a real-life shooting", citing a statistic that "the likelihood of a public school student being killed by a gunman is 'less than 1 in 614 million'". He has also "criticized several school districts across the country which use theatrical recreations including firing blank rounds at students and using fake blood to imitate a real mass shooting".[294]

Foreign policy[edit]

Yang supports American international alliances such as NATO.[285] He has pledged to return the power to declare war to Congress if elected.[285] He would also create a position for secretary of cybersecurity.[285] In regard to the Israeli–Palestinian conflict, Yang wants a "two-state solution that allows both the Israeli and Palestinian people to have sovereign land and self-determination". He called Iran a "destabilizing force in the region", while also stating that leaving the JCPOA was a "strategic mistake", and he is opposed to engaging in an armed conflict with the country because it would have "no clear benefit for the American people".[295] Yang has backed a more aggressive policy toward Russia, saying that "Russia is our biggest geopolitical threat, because they've been hacking our democracy successfully."[296] He wrote to the Council on Foreign Relations:

Russian aggression is a destabilizing force, and we must work with our allies to project a strong and unified face against Russian expansionism ... we need to expand sanctions against Russia, and Putin and members of his government specifically through the Global Magnitsky Act, in order to pressure the country to play by international rules.[295]

Yang also wants a "reset of the relationship with Saudi Arabia" due to the country's actions in Yemen and the assassination of Jamal Khashoggi.[295]

Higher education[edit]

Regarding student loans, Yang has proposed reducing student loan burden, improving efficacy of funds invested in education, and increasing the accountability of educational institutions.[297] He supports affirmative action, believing that there has "never been a truly objective process" for college admissions, owing to "preference for legacies".[298] He has said that he views the rising cost of tuition as one of the greatest issues facing higher education today. He identifies an increase in administration staff as the cause of the rising cost, and supports tying federal fund access to affordability and accessibility to curb the excess.[299][300]

Additionally, he is in favor of promoting vocational education and technical training as an alternative for college, saying "College is being over-prescribed in this country. ... Georgetown has estimated that there are 30 million good-paying jobs out there that don't require a college degree. Most require some type of specialized training."[301]

Immigration[edit]

Yang is a supporter of the DREAM Act, a bill that would protect migrants who entered the United States illegally as minors.[285] He would create a new category of residency that would allow certain undocumented migrants to gain citizenship after 18 years in the country.[285] He would implement new technology to secure the Mexico–United States border, and increase financial support for ports of entry and environmental protections around the Rio Grande.[285] Yang claims that immigrants are being scapegoated for the problem of job displacement through automation, stating that "If you go to a factory here in Michigan, you will not find wall-to-wall immigrants, you will find wall to wall robots and machines."[302]

LGBT rights[edit]

Yang has promised to enact legislation that prevents discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.[285] He believes that "the protections of the Civil Rights Act should apply to LGBTQ+ Americans".[303]

Miscellaneous policies[edit]

Yang has proposed to eliminate the penny, reasoning that pennies "are expensive, environmentally damaging, and cost businesses time".[304] He also wants to extend daylight saving time all year, which, according to Yang, will decrease "traffic accidents, heart attacks, and crime" and increase "exercise and economic activity".[305] Yang also believes that NCAA athletes should be paid, which will enable "college athletes to participate in the massive wealth creation they enable for their institutions".[306] He supports legalizing online poker in all 50 states, the "first legitimate candidate" to do so according to Card Player.[307]

Endorsements[edit]

Yang has received endorsements or explicit expressions of support from officials such as Steve Marchand,[308] David Kim,[309] and Teresa Keng,[310] as well as individuals including Elon Musk,[311][312] Casey Neistat,[313] MC Jin,[314] Anita Baker,[315] Sam Altman,[316] Tony Hsieh,[317] James Felton Keith,[318] Eliot Horowitz,[316] China Mac,[319] Ethan Klein,[320] Kirsten Lepore,[321] Stephen Sean Ford,[322] Greg Ellis,[323] Marcellus Wiley,[324] Simu Liu,[325] Joe Wong,[326] Daniel Negreanu,[327] Faraz Jaka,[328] Andy Stern,[329] Tommy Chong,[330] Dominique Wilkins,[331] Eugene Gu,[332] Bobby Kim,[333] Mark Schultz,[334] Adam22,[335] Christina Hoff Sommers,[336] Peter Boghossian,[337] Lloyd Ahlquist,[338] and Hannibal Buress. [339]

Yang has received campaign donations from Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey, actors Nicolas Cage and Noah Centineo, Weezer frontman Rivers Cuomo,[340] and Internet personality Ryan Higa.[341]

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ The full interview was released on October 5, 2019, and divided into three videos.[116][117][118]
  2. ^ The Tax Foundation estimates that these five methods would generate $1.3 trillion annually (based on 66% of the GDP). According to Yang, approximately another trillion would be generated by taxes on new economic growth, as well as some people opting out of their current benefits in favor of the dividend.[254]
  3. ^ The Tax Foundation proposes that "A more realistic plan would require reducing the Freedom Dividend to $750 per month and raising the VAT to 22 percent."[254]

Citations

  1. ^ a b Yang, Andrew (November 6, 2017). "Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). U.S. Federal Election Commission. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 2, 2018. Retrieved March 2, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Organization of Friends of Andrew Yang - Staff, Advisors and Supporters". www.democracyinaction.us. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  3. ^ Davies, Emily (April 13, 2018). "Alum makes 2020 presidential bid". The Brown Daily Herald. Archived from the original on July 6, 2019. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  4. ^ "Andrew Yang Fast Facts". CNN. August 28, 2019. Archived from the original on August 29, 2019. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  5. ^ Seligson, Hannah (July 13, 2013). "No Six-Figure Pay, but Making a Difference". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 14, 2018. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  6. ^ Carson, Jon (April 27, 2012). "Celebrating a Year of Champions of Change – President Obama Meets with 12 Champions Who Are Making a Difference in Their Communities". Obama White House. Archived from the original on January 31, 2018. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  7. ^ Brayton, Jenna (May 11, 2015). "The White House Celebrates Entrepreneurs Around the World". Obama White House. Archived from the original on July 29, 2019. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  8. ^ Ballard, Julia (March 29, 2017). "Andrew Yang Steps Down as Venture for America CEO". Silicon Bayou News. Archived from the original on January 7, 2019. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  9. ^ Murphy, Jason Burke (July 16, 2018). "Interview: Presidential campaign brings 'new crowds' to basic income". Basic Income Earth Network. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  10. ^ a b c d "Andrew Yang: Being the free-money guy won't hurt me". USA Today. September 19, 2019. Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved September 21, 2019.
  11. ^ "Random Man Runs for President". Washington Post. Retrieved November 15, 2019.
  12. ^ "Andrew Yang for President – Humanity First". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on February 24, 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  13. ^ Feng, Zhaoyin (September 29, 2019). "The 'Asian math guy' trying to be next US president". BBC. Archived from the original on September 29, 2019. Retrieved September 29, 2019.
  14. ^ Shay, Miya (September 10, 2019). "Andrew Yang supporters looking for momentum in Houston". ABC13 Houston. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  15. ^ Yang, Andrew (March 7, 2019). "He Could Be the First Asian President of the United States". NextShark. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved March 11, 2019.
  16. ^ "Kirkus Review". Kirkus Reviews. February 5, 2018. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  17. ^ Clifford, Catherine (April 20, 2018). "This presidential hopeful will give away $1,000 a month to demonstrate the benefits of cash handouts". CNBC. Archived from the original on May 14, 2018. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  18. ^ "Andrew Yang on Twitter". Twitter. Archived from the original on April 21, 2019. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  19. ^ "Andrew Yang". Iowa Democratic Wing Ding. October 24, 2014. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  20. ^ Sexton, Adam (June 12, 2018). "In NH, presidential candidate Andrew Yang touts universal basic income". WMUR. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  21. ^ Steinhauser, Paul (April 25, 2018). "Presidential candidate Andrew Yang aims to prove it can pay to live in N.H." Concord Monitor. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019.
  22. ^ Sullivan, Adam. "Tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang pitches big ideas to Iowa". The Gazette. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  23. ^ Newman, Mark. "Labor Day event promotes worker unity". Ottumwa Courier. Archived from the original on August 31, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  24. ^ Steinhauser, Paul (January 21, 2019). "Meet the 2020 longshots: Confidence, and maybe some ego, keep these candidates in crowded race against all odds". Fox News. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  25. ^ Gage, John (March 14, 2019). "Yang gang: The memes powering one longshot Democrat's unlikely ascent to the debate stage". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  26. ^ Matthews, Dylan (March 11, 2019). "Andrew Yang, the 2020 long-shot candidate running on a universal basic income, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  27. ^ Andrew Yang Talks Universal Basic Income, Benefitting From Tech, His Run For President + More, archived from the original on July 3, 2019, retrieved August 3, 2019
  28. ^ Samson·April 8, Carl; Read, 2019·7 Min (April 8, 2019). "Andrew Yang Sat Down With Ben Shapiro and it Went… Surprisingly Well". NextShark. Archived from the original on August 3, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  29. ^ Wulfsohn, Joseph A. (March 2, 2019). "2020 candidate Andrew Yang tells Tucker Carlson: 'I'm running for president ... to save jobs from automation'". Fox. Archived from the original on March 9, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  30. ^ "Inside the Democrats' Podcast Presidential Primary". TheWrap. July 25, 2019. Archived from the original on August 3, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  31. ^ Brandom, Russell (April 17, 2019). "Andrew Yang is the candidate for the end of the world". The Verge. Archived from the original on July 3, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  32. ^ O'Connor, Maureen (June 10, 2019). "Random Man Runs for President". Washington Post.
  33. ^ Sam Stein; Will Sommer. "How Little Known Andrew Yang May End Up on the 2020 Debate Stage by Gaming the System". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on March 9, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  34. ^ a b Roose, Kevin (March 20, 2019). "In Andrew Yang, the Internet Finds a Meme-Worthy Candidate". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  35. ^ Sommer, Will (March 13, 2019). "Presidential Hopeful Andrew Yang Is a Hit With the Alt-Right". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  36. ^ Bort, Ryan (March 20, 2019). "What Is Going on With Andrew Yang's Candidacy?". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on August 9, 2019. Retrieved August 26, 2019.
  37. ^ Brandom, Russell (March 9, 2019). "Presidential candidate Andrew Yang has a meme problem". The Verge. Archived from the original on March 10, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  38. ^ Karanth, Sanjana (April 14, 2019). "Andrew Yang Said He Disavows White Nationalists' Support For His 2020 Candidacy". HuffPost. Archived from the original on June 24, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  39. ^ Yong, Howard (March 10, 2019). "Andrew Yang hosts presidential campaign rally in Austin". The Daily Texan. Archived from the original on August 23, 2019. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  40. ^ Fimrite, Peter (March 19, 2019). "SF meets Andrew Yang, a presidential candidate who's attracting support from Millennials - SFChronicle.com". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on August 25, 2019. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  41. ^ Sebastian, Dave (April 11, 2019). "Democratic presidential hopeful Andrew Yang rallies in Boston". Boston University News Service. Archived from the original on August 5, 2019. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  42. ^ Merica, Dan (April 15, 2019). "Seven takeaways from CNN's town halls with Andrew Yang and Marianne Williamson". CNN. Archived from the original on May 5, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  43. ^ Perticone, Joe (April 16, 2019). "Democrat Andrew Yang's raucous rally at the Lincoln Memorial showed why young people love the math-obsessed candidate". Business Insider. Archived from the original on July 14, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  44. ^ Capelouto, J. D. (April 19, 2019). "Democrat Yang brings presidential campaign to Atlanta". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  45. ^ Samuel, Braslow (April 25, 2019). "Andrew Yang Probably Isn't Who You Think He Is". Los Angeles Magazine. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  46. ^ Solis, Jacob (April 25, 2019). "In Las Vegas, presidential hopeful Andrew Yang says Nevada is 'Ground Zero' for disruption from automation". The Nevada Independent. Archived from the original on July 7, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  47. ^ Swaby, Natalie (May 3, 2019). "2020 presidential hopeful Andrew Yang campaigns in Seattle". K5 News. Archived from the original on May 7, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  48. ^ Cunningham, Rachel (May 5, 2019). "Andrew Yang talks plan for Universal Basic Income, beating President Trump and more at Detroit rally". The Michigan Daily. Archived from the original on June 16, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  49. ^ Yang, Andrew (May 6, 2019). "3 Rallies in 3 Cities". Yang2020. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  50. ^ Wagner, Jeff (May 5, 2019). "2020 Democrats Make Campaign Stops In Twin Cities". CBS Minnesota. Archived from the original on May 6, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  51. ^ "Presidential candidate Andrew Yang's plan for universal basic income". TODAY. May 5, 2019. Archived from the original on July 19, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  52. ^ Kwong, Jessica (May 16, 2019). "Andrew Yang Excites Young NYC Crowd by Sidestepping Trump and Talking His 'Humanity First' 2020 Plan". Newsweek. Archived from the original on July 23, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  53. ^ Democratic Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang's Three Big Policies, archived from the original on September 3, 2019, retrieved September 24, 2019
  54. ^ "Real Time with Bill Maher". HBO. Archived from the original on August 3, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  55. ^ Segers, Grace (June 15, 2019). "2020 candidates to face questions from low-income Americans at forum". CBS News. Archived from the original on June 16, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  56. ^ Lockhart, P. R. (June 18, 2019). "2020 Democrats share plans to fight poverty at presidential forum". Vox. Archived from the original on July 9, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  57. ^ Full Andrew Yang: 'I'm Already Peeling Off Thousands Of Trump Supporters' | MTP Daily | MSNBC, archived from the original on August 9, 2019, retrieved September 24, 2019
  58. ^ a b Beason, Tyrone (June 22, 2019). "Democrats converge on South Carolina for fried fish, selfies and very short speeches". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on July 8, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  59. ^ "Dozens of presidential candidates attend South Carolina Democratic Weekend". WYFF. June 22, 2019. Archived from the original on June 19, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  60. ^ Klein, Rick; Pezenik, Sasha (June 21, 2019). "The Note: 2020 race testing Joe Biden at sore spots". ABC News. Archived from the original on July 24, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  61. ^ Lerer, Lisa (June 12, 2019). "Planned Parenthood to Host Women's Health Forum for 2020 Democrats". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on June 12, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  62. ^ Andrew Yang's Plan To Give Everyone $1K Per Month, archived from the original on July 1, 2019, retrieved August 1, 2019
  63. ^ "2020 Democrat Andrew Yang makes his case to Stephen Colbert for a universal income, free marriage counseling". The Week. June 25, 2019. Archived from the original on August 1, 2019. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  64. ^ Andrew Yang on The View (Full Interview), archived from the original on July 31, 2019, retrieved August 1, 2019
  65. ^ Sparling, Zane (July 13, 2019). "Presidential candidate Andrew Yang draws crowd in Portland". Portland Tribune. Pamplin Media Group. Archived from the original on August 5, 2019. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  66. ^ "GET TICKETS - AARP and The Des Moines Register Iowa Presidential Candidate Forums". AARP Iowa. Archived from the original on July 9, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  67. ^ "Full video: Andrew Yang speaks at the AARP/Des Moines Register forums (14/17)". YouTube. July 21, 2019. Archived from the original on July 29, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  68. ^ Andrew Yang - Bringing Bold and Unique Ideas to His 2020 White House Bid | The Daily Show, archived from the original on August 2, 2019, retrieved August 1, 2019
  69. ^ Andrew Yang previews second round of Democratic debates, archived from the original on August 29, 2019, retrieved September 24, 2019
  70. ^ Andrew Yang: 'Make America Think Harder' | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC, archived from the original on August 8, 2019, retrieved September 24, 2019
  71. ^ Osborne, Mark; Thomas, Elizabeth (August 4, 2019). "Democratic candidates call for gun control in wake of El Paso, Dayton shootings". ABC News. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  72. ^ Andrew Yang - H3 Podcast #132, archived from the original on August 14, 2019, retrieved August 8, 2019
  73. ^ Ulmer, Clare; Akin, Katie (July 18, 2019). "Des Moines Register Political Soapbox bringing more than 20 presidential candidates to the Iowa State Fair". Des Moines Register. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  74. ^ Hayes, Christal; Pfannenstiel, Brianne; Coltrain, Nick; Richardson, Ian; Rodriguez, Barbara (August 8, 2019). "Iowa State Fair: 2020 Democrats swarm to make their case on the Soapbox". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on August 14, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  75. ^ Schwab, Nikki (August 9, 2019). "Presidential candidate Andrew Yang wants to make Tax Day a national holiday". New York Post. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  76. ^ Kelly, Caroline; Saenz, Arlette (August 10, 2019). "Andrew Yang breaks down in tears at gun safety town hall: 'I have a three- and six-year-old boy, and I was imagining...'". CNN. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  77. ^ Mindock, Clark (August 11, 2019). "Andrew Yang breaks down in tears over gun violence as 2020 Democrats call for action in Iowa". The Independent. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  78. ^ Wise, Justin (August 11, 2019). "Andrew Yang breaks down in tears while addressing gun violence at town hall". The Hill. Archived from the original on August 13, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  79. ^ Halaschak, Zachary (August 11, 2019). "WATCH: Andrew Yang weeps at the effects of gun violence". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  80. ^ Cillizza, Chris (August 12, 2019). "The case for crying in politics". CNN. Archived from the original on August 13, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  81. ^ a b Anderson Cooper 360° [@AC360] (August 12, 2019). ""Money talks in this country." Presidential candidate Andrew Yang explains his plan to take on the NRA..." (Tweet). Retrieved August 13, 2019 – via Twitter.
  82. ^ Moody, Stephen (August 15, 2019). "Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang visits the Lowcountry". WJCL. Archived from the original on August 19, 2019. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  83. ^ FULL CAPACITY: Presidential candidate Andrew Yang gets big crowd in NH, archived from the original on August 28, 2019, retrieved September 9, 2019
  84. ^ Becket, Stefan (August 18, 2019). "Andrew Yang defends plan to give every American $1,000 a month". CBS News. Archived from the original on August 18, 2019. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  85. ^ "Transcript: Andrew Yang on "Face the Nation," August 18, 2019". CBS News. August 18, 2019. Archived from the original on August 20, 2019. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  86. ^ Keith, Tamara (August 20, 2019). "'We Have To Turn The Clock Forward': Andrew Yang On Accelerating Economy And Society". NPR. Archived from the original on August 20, 2019. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  87. ^ "Andrew Yang Speaks at the DNC Summer Meeting and Fires up Audience | Full Speech August 23rd 2019". YouTube. August 23, 2019. Archived from the original on August 24, 2019. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  88. ^ Ke, Bryan (August 26, 2019). "Andrew Yang Absolutely Killed It at the DNC Summer Meeting This Weekend". NextShark. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  89. ^ a b c "It's Worse Than You Think - Lower Emissions, Higher Ground". Andrew Yang for President. August 26, 2019. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  90. ^ a b c d Matthews, Dylan (August 26, 2019). "Andrew Yang's plan to tackle climate change, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  91. ^ Cuomo Prime Time [@CuomoPrimeTime] (August 29, 2019). "Andrew Yang: "We have to solve the problems that got Donald Trump elected in the first place..." (Tweet). Retrieved August 31, 2019 – via Twitter.
  92. ^ "CNN Climate Crisis Town Hall with Andrew Yang (D), Presidential Candidate". CNN. September 4, 2019. Archived from the original on September 11, 2019. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  93. ^ Andrew Yang: "The American Dream is dying by the numbers", archived from the original on September 10, 2019, retrieved September 8, 2019
  94. ^ Andrew Yang speaks at the NH Democratic Party Convention, retrieved September 8, 2019
  95. ^ Zint, Bradley (September 8, 2019). "Three Democratic presidential hopefuls state their case at forum in Costa Mesa". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on September 9, 2019. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  96. ^ "An Interview with Andrew Yang, an Outsider at Tonight's Democratic Debate". The Daily. The New York Times. September 12, 2019. Archived from the original on September 12, 2019. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  97. ^ a b Choi, Matthew (September 15, 2019). "Andrew Yang defends random money giveaway". POLITICO. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  98. ^ Why You Should Vote for Andrew Yang (Ft. Andrew Yang) - Off The Pill Podcast #32, archived from the original on September 15, 2019, retrieved September 15, 2019
  99. ^ Kashinsky, Lisa (September 17, 2019). "'Yang Gang' comes out for Andrew Yang in Cambridge". Boston Herald. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  100. ^ Sasko, Claire (September 17, 2019). "Biden, Sanders Among 6 Democratic Presidential Candidates in Philly on Tuesday". Philadelphia Magazine. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  101. ^ Summers, Juana (September 17, 2019). "At Philadelphia rally, Andrew Yang casts himself as underdog". Washington Post. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  102. ^ Druke, Galen; Silver, Nate (September 19, 2019). "Politics Podcast: We Ran Into Andrew Yang At The Airport". FiveThirtyEight. Archived from the original on September 22, 2019. Retrieved September 19, 2019.
  103. ^ Smith, Allan (September 19, 2019). "Now is the 'second best' time to address climate change, Yang says". NBC News. Archived from the original on September 20, 2019. Retrieved September 19, 2019.
  104. ^ Andrew Yang on Universal Basic Income and Measuring Our Economic Health, archived from the original on September 20, 2019, retrieved September 20, 2019
  105. ^ "Firing Line with Margaret Hoover: Andrew Yang". PBS. September 20, 2019. Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved September 21, 2019.
  106. ^ Segers, Grace (September 21, 2019). "17 Democratic candidates attend Iowa steak fry". CBS News. Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  107. ^ 2020 Hopeful Andrew Yang Talks with Voters in Des Moines, Iowa | NowThis, archived from the original on September 21, 2019, retrieved September 25, 2019
  108. ^ Andrew Yang on The Van Jones Show | Full Interview September 21st 2019, archived from the original on September 22, 2019, retrieved September 22, 2019
  109. ^ "DMPS, Register Host Youth Forum for Presidential Candidates". Des Moines Public Schools. September 11, 2019. Archived from the original on September 22, 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  110. ^ Andrew Yang opens two campaign offices in Iowa, archived from the original on September 22, 2019, retrieved September 23, 2019
  111. ^ Full Extended Interview: Andrew Yang sits down with Krystal Ball, archived from the original on September 22, 2019, retrieved September 22, 2019
  112. ^ Maddow, Rachel (September 24, 2019). "Yang on impeachment: At some point you have to do the right thing". MSNBC. Archived from the original on September 25, 2019. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  113. ^ Garcia, Armando; Shah, Zohreen (September 26, 2019). "Andrew Yang on 'The View': 'Zero truth' to former staffer's firing claims". ABC News. Retrieved September 26, 2019.
  114. ^ Staff, Sierra Hubbard Sentinel. "Candidate Yang brings humor to appearance in Peterborough". SentinelSource.com. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  115. ^ Beason, Tyrone (September 30, 2019). "With hip-hop and f-bombs, Andrew Yang rallies the faithful at MacArthur Park". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on October 1, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  116. ^ FULL INTERVIEW PART ONE: Andrew Yang on Running for President and More!, retrieved October 12, 2019
  117. ^ FULL INTERVIEW PART TWO: Andrew Yang on Running for President and More!, retrieved October 12, 2019
  118. ^ FULL INTERVIEW PART THREE: Andrew Yang on Running for President and More!, retrieved October 12, 2019
  119. ^ a b Harwood, John (October 2, 2019). "2020 candidate Andrew Yang: 'The fundamentals that we assume to be true about capitalism are now breaking down'". CNBC. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  120. ^ "Gun Safety Forum: Live updates from Las Vegas". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 2, 2019. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  121. ^ Donahue, Lillian (October 5, 2019). "Voters and presidential candidates attend democratic Blue Jamboree in record numbers". WBTV. Archived from the original on October 7, 2019. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  122. ^ Milano, Alyssa (October 7, 2019). "Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang". Simplecast. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  123. ^ Andrew Yang on "The Portal", Episode #008: The Different Candidate the Media Wants You to Ignore., archived from the original on October 12, 2019, retrieved October 15, 2019
  124. ^ Andrew Yang on The Dr. Oz Show | Full Interview October 11th 2019, retrieved October 12, 2019
  125. ^ Andrew Yang on jobs, income, and his unlikely campaign, retrieved October 14, 2019
  126. ^ Skalka, Liz (October 13, 2019). "Is Ohio still competitive? Democrats running for president think so". Toledo Blade. Archived from the original on October 15, 2019. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  127. ^ Andrew Yang's Full Speech at the Ohio Democratic Party Dinner | October 13th 2019, retrieved October 15, 2019
  128. ^ The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer [@CNNSitRoom] (October 16, 2019). "2020 presidential candidate @AndrewYang on his differing views over the wealth tax with Elizabeth Warren: "We have many similar goals… So, I think that she and I are going to be able to find ways to hopefully get to the same goal post even if we might have different visions."" (Tweet). Retrieved October 17, 2019 – via Twitter.
  129. ^ Maddow, Rachel (October 17, 2019). "Yang: No easy answer to fixing Trump's disaster in Syria". MSNBC. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  130. ^ Maddow, Rachel (October 17, 2019). "Yang: Universal basic income should be in Democratic politics". MSNBC. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  131. ^ Whalen, Andrew (October 18, 2019). "Andrew Yang plans "unprecedented" campaign moves and names "Akira" favorite anime in marathon Q&A". Newsweek. Retrieved October 19, 2019.
  132. ^ Booker, Brakkton (October 19, 2019). "Andrew Yang Says There Is No Guarantee Impeaching Trump Will Be Successful". NPR. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  133. ^ Andrew Yang Talks Universal Basic Income, Climate Change, With Undecided Voters | Off Script | NPR, retrieved October 23, 2019
  134. ^ Russo, Lori (October 15, 2019). "Democratic Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang speaks at Newsmaker Monday, Oct. 21". The National Press Club. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  135. ^ Andrew Yang Holds 'Humanity First' Press Conference, retrieved October 22, 2019
  136. ^ "The 2020 Candidates: Andrew Yang". The Washington Post. October 21, 2019. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  137. ^ Andrew Yang holds 2020 campaign town hall in New Hampshire, retrieved October 29, 2019
  138. ^ Andrew Yang, Democratic Candidate for President 2020, retrieved October 29, 2019
  139. ^ Sadler, John (October 27, 2019). "Las Vegans discuss issues with candidates at presidential forum". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  140. ^ Wojcik, Nik (October 29, 2019). "'Yang Gangers' roar for Andrew Yang despite fires, windstorm". SFBay. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  141. ^ Andrew Yang: When we're talking about Trump, we're losing, retrieved October 30, 2019
  142. ^ Andrew Yang On $1,000 A Month Plan, Tulsi Gabbard, Trump's Impeachment & College Loan Forgiveness, retrieved October 31, 2019
  143. ^ Hogan, Marc; Bloom, Madison (November 1, 2019). "Here's What Happened During Rivers Cuomo's Set at the Andrew Yang Rally in Iowa". Pitchfork. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  144. ^ Bradner, Eric; Merica, Dan (November 2, 2019). "7 takeaways from Iowa Democrats' biggest night of the year". CNN. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  145. ^ Watson, Sarah (November 2, 2019). "Andrew Yang opens office in Iowa City". The Daily Iowan. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  146. ^ Coltrain, Nick; Rodriguez, Barbara. "'This isn't a black issue; it's an American issue:' Democratic presidential candidates pitch economic equality at NAACP forum". Des Moines Register. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  147. ^ Full speech: Andrew Yang | Iowa disability forum (8/8) (11.2.19), retrieved November 4, 2019
  148. ^ Evelyn Yang joins 2020 hopeful husband Andrew for their first joint interview, retrieved November 4, 2019
  149. ^ Full Yang: 'Hard-Eyed Realist' Needed In 21st century | Meet The Press | NBC News, retrieved November 4, 2019
  150. ^ Andrew Yang holds 2020 campaign rally in Virginia, retrieved November 11, 2019
  151. ^ "Watch or Listen: 2020 Candidate Forum with Andrew Yang". New Hampshire Public Radio. Retrieved November 11, 2019.
  152. ^ Stracqualursi, Veronica (November 8, 2019). "Andrew Yang on Bloomberg's potential entry into 2020 race: 'There are limits to what money can do'". CNN. Retrieved November 17, 2019.
  153. ^ Yang, Andrew (November 14, 2019). "Andrew Yang: Yes, Robots Are Stealing Your Job". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 17, 2019.
  154. ^ Mehta, Seema (November 15, 2019). "Democratic presidential candidates woo Californians as the party faithful convene in Long Beach". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 17, 2019.
  155. ^ Matthews, Dylan (March 11, 2019). "Andrew Yang, the 2020 long-shot candidate running on a universal basic income, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  156. ^ a b Yang, Andrew (June 28, 2019). "Donor #130,000 is Joshua Evans from Havertown, Pennsylvania! Thank you Joshua and thank you #YangGang! Onwards to 2020!". @AndrewYang. Archived from the original on July 2, 2019. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  157. ^ Prokop, Andrew (August 8, 2019). "Here's the finalized lineup for the September Democratic debate". Vox. Archived from the original on September 1, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  158. ^ a b Wright, David (April 2, 2019). "Yang raises $1.7M for 2020 bid in 1st quarter". CNN. Archived from the original on April 13, 2019. Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  159. ^ a b Montellaro, Zach (July 11, 2019). "Andrew Yang raises $2.8 million in second quarter". POLITICO. Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  160. ^ Campisi, Jessica (August 6, 2019). "Andrew Yang releases Spotify playlist of 'favorite jams'". TheHill. Archived from the original on August 6, 2019. Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  161. ^ Andrew Yang [@AndrewYang] (August 13, 2019). "Let's go #YangGang! 😎" (Tweet). Retrieved August 14, 2019 – via Twitter.
  162. ^ a b c Andrew Yang [@AndrewYang] (August 15, 2019). "We just passed 200,000 donors - thank you #YangGang!!" (Tweet). Retrieved August 22, 2019 – via Twitter.
  163. ^ Andrew Yang [@AndrewYang] (August 17, 2019). "Among donors to this campaign, the most common jobs are software engineers, teachers, drivers, retail workers and warehouse workers" (Tweet). Retrieved August 22, 2019 – via Twitter.
  164. ^ Andrew Yang [@AndrewYang] (September 1, 2019). "This campaign is truly of the people - the highest percentage of small dollar donors ($25 on average) and no corporate PAC money..." (Tweet). Retrieved September 9, 2019 – via Twitter.
  165. ^ a b Thompson, Alex (September 16, 2019). "Andrew Yang's campaign says over 450,000 people have entered debate contest". POLITICO. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  166. ^ "Andrew Yang's 257% fundraising surge blows away all other Democratic candidates". finance.yahoo.com. Archived from the original on October 4, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  167. ^ Stevens, Matt (October 2, 2019). "Andrew Yang Raises $10 Million in Third Fund-Raising Quarter". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 2, 2019. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  168. ^ "Election 2020: Andrew Yang". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  169. ^ Schleifer, Theodore (October 18, 2019). "A new high-powered super PAC is going to spend millions to back Andrew Yang". Vox. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  170. ^ a b "Who is Andrew Yang's YangGang?". Bloomberg. May 16, 2019. Archived from the original on September 1, 2019. Retrieved September 1, 2019.
  171. ^ Weigel, David (March 26, 2019). "Politics Analysis – The Trailer: 2020 has its candidate for people who hate politicians". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. OCLC 2269358. Archived from the original on March 26, 2019. Retrieved March 26, 2019.
  172. ^ Roose, Kevin (March 20, 2019). "In Andrew Yang, the Internet Finds a Meme-Worthy Candidate". The New York Times. ISSN 1553-8095. Archived from the original on March 20, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  173. ^ Mak, Aaron (August 26, 2019). "The Yang Gang Is Brigading Everything From IMDb to Random Bernie Bros' Twitter Polls". Slate Magazine. Archived from the original on August 31, 2019. Retrieved September 1, 2019.
  174. ^ Goldsmith, Scott. "The Surprising Surge of Andrew Yang". Politico Magazine. Politico Magazine. Archived from the original on August 30, 2019. Retrieved September 1, 2019.
  175. ^ Roose, Kevin. "In Andrew Yang, the Internet Finds a Meme-Worthy Candidate". New York Times. New York Times. Archived from the original on March 20, 2019. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  176. ^ Breland, Ali (September 12, 2019). "Inside the #YangGang's debate night influence machine". Mother Jones. Archived from the original on September 13, 2019. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  177. ^ "Yang's Nontraditional Supporters Are Real And Ready To Vote". Iowa Starting Line. November 5, 2019. Retrieved November 11, 2019.
  178. ^ Tyler, MacDonald (October 26, 2019). "Andrew Yang Supporters Attend NYC Universal Basic Income March". The Inquisitr. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  179. ^ Sánchez, Jhon (October 28, 2019). "Basic Income March from Harlem to the Bronx". Pressenza. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  180. ^ Mitchell, Ben; Mitchell, Lacrai (November 1, 2019). "In South Carolina, Andrew Yang maximizes digital reach to mobilize ground game". CBS News. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  181. ^ Brandt, Jadyn (October 30, 2019). "Student activists host canvassing event for Democratic presidential candidate Yang". The Daily Aztec. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  182. ^ "Andrew Yang Blackballed From MSNBC's 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidate Chart". www.inquisitr.com. Archived from the original on July 15, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  183. ^ Nguyen·June 10, Kimberly; Read, 2019·8 Min (June 10, 2019). "Andrew Yang Totally Ignored on MSNBC's List of 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates". NextShark. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  184. ^ Klar, Rebecca (August 29, 2019). "Yang hits CNN, media over campaign coverage". TheHill. Archived from the original on August 29, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  185. ^ EDT, Jennifer Doherty On 8/29/19 at 5:38 PM (August 29, 2019). "Andrew Yang fans are crying foul over candidate's lack of media coverage". Newsweek. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  186. ^ Panetta, Grace. "Andrew Yang's campaign says CNN corrected a chyron that excluded Yang in favor of a lower-polling candidate". Business Insider. Archived from the original on August 29, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  187. ^ "Yang Gang Calls Out CNN for Glaring Omission on Poll Graphic". Mediaite. August 29, 2019. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  188. ^ Andrew Yang [@AndrewYang] (September 5, 2019). "Sometimes honest mistakes happen. But NBC and MSNBC seem to omit me on the regular. @scottsantens has a fun compilation. Here are a few examples..." (Tweet). Retrieved September 12, 2019 – via Twitter.
  189. ^ Wu, Nicholas. "'John Yang?' Andrew Yang pokes fun at MSNBC for flubbing his name in broadcast". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on September 11, 2019. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  190. ^ Yam, Kimberly (September 10, 2019). "MSNBC Misidentifies Andrew Yang As 'John Yang'". HuffPost. Archived from the original on September 12, 2019. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  191. ^ Pitofsky, Marina (October 4, 2019). "Yang calls out CNN, MSNBC for leaving him off of fundraising graphics". TheHill. Archived from the original on October 5, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  192. ^ Cillizza, Chris (September 4, 2019). "Is Andrew Yang being unfairly ignored?". CNN. Archived from the original on September 10, 2019. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  193. ^ Rothschild, Neal; Fischer, Sara (September 3, 2019). "Andrew Yang gets media cold shoulder". Axios. Archived from the original on September 4, 2019. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  194. ^ Ball, Krystal (September 7, 2019). "Why the media dislike Andrew, Tulsi, Bernie and Marianne". The Hill. Archived from the original on September 9, 2019. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  195. ^ Santens, Scott (October 23, 2019). "A Visual History of the #YangMediaBlackout". The Swamp. Retrieved October 23, 2019.
  196. ^ Rowland, Geoffrey (November 18, 2019). "MSNBC apologizes after leaving Yang out of presidential poll graphic". TheHill. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  197. ^ Wulfsohn, Joseph (November 18, 2019). "Yang campaign rips MSNBC's apology after network snubbed him from polling graphic 'for the 15th time'". Fox News. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  198. ^ Yang, Andrew (March 11, 2019). "We did it!!!! THANK YOU everyone who supported us to make it happen!!! First stop debates next stop White House!!!pic.twitter.com/i5XXkotffH". @AndrewYang. Archived from the original on May 29, 2019. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  199. ^ Montellaro, Zach. "2020 Democratic polls". Politico (Google Sheets). Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  200. ^ Segers, Grace (June 14, 2019). "DNC announces candidates participating in first Democratic primary debates". CBS News. Archived from the original on June 15, 2019. Retrieved June 16, 2019.
  201. ^ "First Democratic presidential debate set for Miami's Arsht Center, host NBC News announces". NBC News. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  202. ^ "Democratic debate: Night two by the numbers". CNN. June 28, 2019. Archived from the original on June 29, 2019. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  203. ^ Davies, Emily; Fuchs, Hailey; Mellnik, Tim; Schaul, Kevin (June 27, 2019). "Who talked most during the June Democratic debate". Washington Post. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  204. ^ Jared Gilmour (June 28, 2019). "Andrew Yang says mic was cut during Democratic debate, but NBC denies muting him". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on July 1, 2019. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  205. ^ Caitlin Oprysko (June 28, 2019). "#LetYangSpeak: Andrew Yang accuses NBC of cutting off his mic". Politico. Archived from the original on July 3, 2019. Retrieved July 6, 2019.
  206. ^ Ellefson, Lindsey (July 8, 2019). "Andrew Yang Addresses Mic-Cutting Dispute During First Presidential Debate (VIDEO)". TheWrap. Archived from the original on July 9, 2019. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  207. ^ Kelly, Caroline (June 28, 2019). "Yang claims microphone was 'off unless called on' during debate; NBC says he's wrong". CNN. Archived from the original on June 30, 2019. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  208. ^ Dwilson, Stephanie Dube (June 28, 2019). "Yang's Muted Mic Concern Is Not the First Time His Supporters Were Worried About MSNBC Coverage". Heavy.com. Archived from the original on July 2, 2019. Retrieved August 2, 2019.
  209. ^ Alexandra D'Elia (April 3, 2019). "What do Democratic candidates need to make the first 2020 debates?". PBS Newshour. Archived from the original on June 28, 2019. Retrieved June 29, 2019.
  210. ^ Quinn, Scanlan; Karson, Kendall (July 29, 2019). "Here's the 2nd 2020 Democratic presidential debates lineup". ABC News. Archived from the original on July 26, 2019. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  211. ^ CNN, Devan Cole. "CNN's 2020 Democratic debate set for July 30-31 in Detroit". CNN. Archived from the original on April 13, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  212. ^ Cai, Weiyi; Lee, Jasmine C.; Love, Juliette; Parlapiano, Alicia (July 31, 2019). "Joe Biden and Kamala Harris Got the Most Speaking Time During the Democratic Debate". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on August 1, 2019. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  213. ^ a b "How CNN turned the second Democratic debate into a series of dogfights". Washington Post. August 1, 2019. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  214. ^ Patterson, Troy (June 27, 2019). "Democratic Debate 2019: Andrew Yang's Bold Lack of a Tie". New Yorker. New York. Archived from the original on June 30, 2019. Retrieved June 27, 2019.
  215. ^ Harris, Tim (August 2, 2019). "Andrew Yang Rips Presidential Election Process: "We're Like Characters In A Play And We Have To Follow It"". New Yorker. New York. Archived from the original on August 3, 2019. Retrieved August 2, 2019.
  216. ^ "Transcript: Night 2 of the second Democratic debate". Washington Post. July 31, 2019. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  217. ^ Blow, Charles M. (August 1, 2019). "Opinion | Yearning for More Yang". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on August 2, 2019. Retrieved August 2, 2019.
  218. ^ Bowden, John (July 31, 2019). "Yang calls out 'reality TV show' style elections that resulted in Trump: 'We need to be laser-focused'". TheHill. Archived from the original on August 1, 2019. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  219. ^ Daniels, Eugene (September 19, 2019). "Yang dishes on why Trump won, Asian jokes and how he'll 'shock the world'". POLITICO. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  220. ^ Lum, Zi-Ann (August 28, 2019). "Liberals undecided if Trudeau will be at 1st leader's debate". The Huffington Post. Archived from the original on August 31, 2019. Retrieved September 1, 2019.
  221. ^ a b Stevens, Matt (August 8, 2019). "Andrew Yang Becomes 9th Democrat to Qualify for the Next Debate". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on August 14, 2019. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  222. ^ Frazin, Rachel (June 30, 2019). "Yang campaign slams DNC over poll qualification criteria for September debate". The Hill. Archived from the original on July 30, 2019. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  223. ^ Karson, Kendall (August 29, 2019). "Final lineup set for sole night of ABC Democratic primary debate". ABC News. Archived from the original on August 29, 2019. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  224. ^ Thompson, Alex (September 12, 2019). "Andrew Yang announces $120,000 giveaway during debate". POLITICO. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  225. ^ Democratic Debate 2019: WATCH LIVE Third 2020 Democratic Presidential Debate from Houston | ABC News, archived from the original on September 12, 2019, retrieved September 13, 2019
  226. ^ "Transcript: The third Democratic debate". The Washington Post. September 12, 2019. Archived from the original on September 13, 2019. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  227. ^ "Democratic debate: Speaking times". CNN. Archived from the original on September 13, 2019. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  228. ^ Schouten, Fredreka (September 13, 2019). "Andrew Yang wants to use donor money to hand out $120,000. Is that legal?". Archived from the original on September 14, 2019. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  229. ^ Cao, Sissi (September 13, 2019). "Reddit Founder Offers to Pay for Andrew Yang's $1,000 a Month Cash Raffle". OBSERVER. Archived from the original on September 15, 2019. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  230. ^ Mohamed, Theron (September 16, 2019). "Crypto whiz kid Justin Sun is giving away $1.2 million to 100 people next year—and wants Andrew Yang to help him | Markets Insider". Markets Insider. Archived from the original on September 17, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  231. ^ Jordan McDonald (August 22, 2019). "2020 candidates face a critical debate deadline. Here's what happens if they miss it". NBC News. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  232. ^ "CNN and New York Times to co-host next Democratic presidential debate". CNN. September 13, 2019. Archived from the original on September 14, 2019. Retrieved September 14, 2019.
  233. ^ "The October Democratic debate transcript". Washington Post. October 15, 2019. Archived from the original on October 16, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  234. ^ Cai, Weiyi; Lee, Jasmine C.; Patel, Jugal K. (October 15, 2019). "Live Tracking Each Candidate's Speaking Time in the Democratic Debate". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  235. ^ Knowles, David (October 15, 2019). "Yang and O'Rourke propose decriminalizing opioids, including heroin". Yahoo News. Archived from the original on October 16, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  236. ^ a b Kelly, Makena (October 15, 2019). "Democrats just had a real debate about automation on stage". The Verge. Archived from the original on October 16, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  237. ^ Matthews, Dylan (October 15, 2019). "5 winners and 3 losers from the October Democratic presidential debate". Vox. Archived from the original on October 16, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  238. ^ Cillizza, Chris (October 16, 2019). "Chris Cillizza's winners and losers from the fourth Democratic debate". CNN. Archived from the original on October 16, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  239. ^ "Democratic debate: Who won, who lost and who's just treading water". New York Post. October 16, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  240. ^ Budryk, Zack (October 15, 2019). "Meghan McCain praises Yang for starting conversation on automation: 'It's incredibly impressive'". The Hill. Archived from the original on October 16, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  241. ^ Zhou, Li (October 15, 2019). "Here's everything you need to know about the November Democratic debate". Vox. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  242. ^ "DNC Announces Qualification Criteria For Fifth Presidential Primary Debate". Democratic National Committee. September 23, 2019. Archived from the original on September 23, 2019. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  243. ^ Montellaro, Zach (October 8, 2019). "Andrew Yang qualifies for 5th Democratic debate". POLITICO. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  244. ^ EDT, Ramsey Touchberry On 10/25/19 at 12:47 PM (October 25, 2019). "Here's who qualifies—and who might not—for the December Democratic debate". Newsweek. Retrieved November 14, 2019.
  245. ^ a b "Our Policies". Andrew Yang for President (official campaign website). Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  246. ^ Benjamin, Zachary (May 10, 2019). "2020 Democratic candidate Yang talks UBI, climate change". The Dartmouth. Archived from the original on June 28, 2019. Retrieved June 28, 2019.
  247. ^ "POTUS1 - Which Candidates Are Committed to Democracy Reform?". Equal Citizens. Archived from the original on September 13, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  248. ^ News, A. B. C. "Andrew Yang: Everything you need to know about the 2020 presidential candidate". ABC News. Archived from the original on June 29, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  249. ^ Gohd, Chelsea (February 13, 2018). "Meet the Long-Shot 2020 Presidential Candidate Who Might Make UBI a Reality". Futurism. Archived from the original on March 10, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  250. ^ a b c Christou, Luke (February 20, 2018). "Andrew Yang 2020: 5 ways the President hopeful would change America – Verdict". Verdict. Archived from the original on February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  251. ^ a b c Coren, Michael (March 26, 2018). "Andrew Yang is running for president to save Americans from machines". Quartz. Archived from the original on March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  252. ^ Mukherjee, Sy (June 27, 2019). "Meet Andrew Yang, the Democratic Candidate Who Wants to Give You $1,000 Each Month". Fortune. Archived from the original on June 29, 2019. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  253. ^ Santens, Scott (September 27, 2019). "There is No Policy Proposal by Any 2020 Presidential Candidate More Progressive than Andrew Yang's Freedom Dividend". Medium. Archived from the original on September 3, 2019. Retrieved September 29, 2019.
  254. ^ a b c Pomerleau, Kyle (July 24, 2019). "Does Andrew Yang's "Freedom Dividend" Proposal Add Up?". Tax Foundation. Archived from the original on October 6, 2019. Retrieved October 6, 2019.
  255. ^ a b c d Dickinson, Tim (January 17, 2019). "Andrew Yang wants to be president — and give you $1,000 a month". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on March 5, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  256. ^ @AndrewYang (April 30, 2018). "Leave minimum wage to states but universal basic income makes it much less necessary" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  257. ^ Zeballos-Roig, Joseph (November 18, 2019). "Elizabeth Warren says Andrew Yang-backed universal basic income among 'options to consider' to ensure American financial well-being". Business Insider. Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  258. ^ Combating Inequality: Rethinking Policies to Reduce Inequality in Advanced Economies (Oct. 17, 2019) (Timestamped link), retrieved October 22, 2019
  259. ^ Matthews, Dylan (October 18, 2019). "Basic income can't do enough to help workers displaced by technology". Vox. Retrieved October 21, 2019.
  260. ^ Lowry, Rich (October 18, 2019). "Andrew Yang, Snake Oil Salesman". National Review. Retrieved October 21, 2019.
  261. ^ Lea, Brittany De (July 11, 2019). "You can't turn truck drivers into coders, Andrew Yang says of job retraining". FOXBusiness. Archived from the original on August 3, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  262. ^ Homan, Timothy R. (October 15, 2019). "Universal basic income advocates warn Yang's 'Freedom Dividend' would harm low-income Americans". TheHill. Retrieved October 21, 2019.
  263. ^ "Human-Centered Capitalism". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on September 4, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  264. ^ "Improve the American Scorecard". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  265. ^ "Fight for Equal Pay". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  266. ^ "Implement Mandatory Paid Leave Policy". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  267. ^ "Make it Easy for Americans to Move for Work". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on September 1, 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  268. ^ Grothaus, Michael (October 1, 2019). "Andrew Yang proposes that your digital data be considered personal property". Fast Company. Archived from the original on October 1, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  269. ^ Handy, Nicholas (February 6, 2019). "Presidential hopeful Andrew Yang visits Peterborough". Monadnock Ledger-Transcript. Archived from the original on March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  270. ^ a b Stolzoff, Simone (December 7, 2018). "Meet Andrew Yang, a 2020 US presidential hopeful running against the robots". Quartz. Archived from the original on March 6, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  271. ^ "Free Financial Counseling for All". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 14, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  272. ^ "Democracy Dollars". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on June 19, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  273. ^ Sadler, John (April 25, 2019). "2020 Democrat Andrew Yang ready to recalibrate U.S. capitalism - Las Vegas Sun Newspaper". lasvegassun.com. Archived from the original on August 3, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  274. ^ "End Partisan Gerrymandering". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  275. ^ "Ranked Choice Voting". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on June 8, 2019. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  276. ^ Mills Rodrigo, Chris (April 3, 2019). "Andrew Yang proposes lowering voting age to 16". The Hill. Archived from the original on April 13, 2019. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  277. ^ "Lower the Voting Age to 16". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  278. ^ Sauer, Natalie (February 4, 2019). "What Democratic presidential hopefuls do (and don't) say about the Green New Deal". Climate Change News. Archived from the original on March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  279. ^ "Nuclear Energy". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on June 19, 2019. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  280. ^ Sullivan, Kate; Bash, Dana; Nolan, Bridget (November 3, 2019). "Yang supports 'Medicare for All' label but would keep private insurance option". CNN. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  281. ^ "Expand Access to Medical Experts". Andrew Yang for President. 2019. Archived from the original on March 6, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  282. ^ "Gun Safety". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on March 19, 2019. Retrieved July 30, 2019.
  283. ^ Bort, Ryan (March 19, 2019). "2020 candidate Andrew Yang takes a stand against circumcision". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on March 19, 2019. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  284. ^ Yang, Andrew (March 19, 2019). "Always up to the parents". Twiter. Archived from the original on March 20, 2019. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  285. ^ a b c d e f g h i Cooney, Dan (March 19, 2019). "What does Andrew Yang believe? Where the candidate stands on 5 issues". PBS. Archived from the original on June 18, 2019. Retrieved June 19, 2019.
  286. ^ "Right to Privacy/Abortion and Contraception". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on September 3, 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  287. ^ Roose, Kevin (February 10, 2018). "His 2020 Campaign Message: The Robots Are Coming". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  288. ^ Merica, Dan (April 14, 2019). "Why Yang supports decriminalizing heroin and other opiates, but not cocaine". CNN. Archived from the original on April 20, 2019. Retrieved April 20, 2019.
  289. ^ Bonn, Tess (September 18, 2019). "Yang says he would decriminalize opiates, as well as marijuana". TheHill. Archived from the original on September 20, 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  290. ^ a b Webster, Jake (August 4, 2019). "Where the Democratic presidential contenders stand on gun control". Iowa State Daily. Archived from the original on August 10, 2019. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  291. ^ "Gun Safety". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on March 19, 2019.
  292. ^ "Andrew Yang: Have gun companies pay a fine when their product is used to kill an American". MSNBC. October 2, 2019. Archived from the original on October 4, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  293. ^ Andrew Yang Speaks at the Everytown Gun Safety Forum, Des Moines IA (August 10, 2019), archived from the original on August 12, 2019, retrieved August 28, 2019
  294. ^ Fearnow, Benjamin (November 4, 2019). "Andrew Yang proposes ending school shooter drills as part of presidential campaign platform". Newsweek. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  295. ^ a b c "Candidates Answer CFR's Questions". Council on Foreign Relations. August 9, 2019. Archived from the original on August 18, 2019. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  296. ^ "The Democratic candidates on foreign policy". Foreign Policy. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  297. ^ "Reduce Student Loan Burden". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  298. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 3, 2019. Retrieved September 4, 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  299. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 3, 2019. Retrieved September 4, 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  300. ^ @AndrewYang (December 28, 2018). "Why has college gotten 250% more expensive in the past 30 years? It's not quality improvements. Or faculty. Or even facilities. It's administration and bureaucracy. The number of college administrators has gone up 250% in the same period" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  301. ^ "Promote Vocational Education". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 7, 2019. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  302. ^ "Snapshot on the issues: Andrew Yang". Detroit News. Archived from the original on August 1, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  303. ^ Andrew Yang [@AndrewYang] (October 11, 2019). "Of course the protections of the Civil Rights Act should apply to LGBTQ+ Americans. No one should be discriminated against based on who they are - imagine having to hide who you are to keep your job. I hope the Supreme Court recognizes this basic truth. It is long overdue" (Tweet). Retrieved October 11, 2019 – via Twitter.
  304. ^ "The Penny Makes No Cents". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  305. ^ "Extend Daylight Saving Time All Year". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  306. ^ "NCAA Should Pay Athletes". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  307. ^ "2020 Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang Tweets Support For Legalizing Poker At The Federal Level". www.cardplayer.com. Retrieved October 30, 2019.
  308. ^ DiStaso, John (April 16, 2019). "Former candidate for governor Marchand joins Yang presidential campaign as senior adviser". WMUR9. Archived from the original on April 16, 2019. Retrieved April 17, 2019.
  309. ^ David Kim [@davidkim2020] (August 14, 2019). "#YangGang" (Tweet). Retrieved August 22, 2019 – via Twitter.
  310. ^ Teresa Keng [@teresakeng] (August 17, 2019). "Way to go!!!! Go #YangGang !!!" (Tweet). Retrieved August 22, 2019 – via Twitter.
  311. ^ Valero, Maria (August 10, 2019). "Elon Musk Says He Supports 2020 White House Hopeful Andrew Yang". Bloomberg. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  312. ^ Wall, Mike (August 13, 2019). "SpaceX's Elon Musk Endorses Democratic Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang". Space.com. Archived from the original on August 13, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  313. ^ Casey Neistat [@Casey] (August 8, 2019). "new 🧢 !" (Tweet). Retrieved August 10, 2019 – via Twitter.
  314. ^ ""Drew Yang Gang That's Who I Hook Up Wit" - MC Jin". June 26, 2019.
  315. ^ "He speaks truth...#YangGang". November 11, 2019.
  316. ^ a b "The Tech 1,000". Andrew Yang for President. June 30, 2019. Archived from the original on August 4, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  317. ^ "His 2020 Campaign Message: The Robots Are Coming". The New York Times. February 10, 2018. Archived from the original on February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  318. ^ James Felton Keith [@JFKii] (July 3, 2019). "We have. This is bigger then 1 candidate" (Tweet). Retrieved July 9, 2019 – via Twitter.
  319. ^ "Rapper CHINA MAC Joins Jesse Lee Peterson! (#130)". June 21, 2019. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  320. ^ Ethan Klein [@h3h3productions] (August 10, 2019). "Confirmed" (Tweet). Retrieved August 10, 2019 – via Twitter.
  321. ^ Kirsten Lepore [@kirstenlepore] (April 22, 2019). "#YangGang" (Tweet). Retrieved August 9, 2019 – via Twitter.
  322. ^ Stephen Sean Ford [@StephenSeanFord] (August 9, 2019). "Yep. 10/10 would vote for @AndrewYang. I dig this guy" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  323. ^ Greg Ellis (actor) [@ellisgreg] (August 11, 2019). "It takes an amazing amount of strength to be this vulnerable in public. This display of emotion makes me admire @AndrewYang even more..." (Tweet). Retrieved August 11, 2019 – via Twitter.
  324. ^ Marcellus Wiley [@marcellswiley] (June 12, 2019). "Just hanging with the next President of the United States, Andrew Yang! He has my full support..." (Tweet). Retrieved August 10, 2019 – via Twitter.
  325. ^ Simu Liu [@simuliu] (August 11, 2019). "I think @AndrewYang displayed the qualities of a true leader when he showed vulnerability, compassion and humanity onstage. Plus, he demolishes a turkey leg like an absolute beast. #YangGang" (Tweet). Retrieved August 11, 2019 – via Twitter.
  326. ^ Joe Wong (comedian) [@joewongcomedy] (June 4, 2019). "It's time for bold and innovative ideas instead of the same tired old arguments and solutions year after year. @AndrewYang" (Tweet). Retrieved August 11, 2019 – via Twitter.
  327. ^ Daniel Negreanu [@RealKidPoker] (August 29, 2019). "I am 💯 #YangGang The momentum is building" (Tweet). Retrieved August 29, 2019 – via Twitter.
  328. ^ Faraz Jaka [@FarazJaka] (August 29, 2019). "LFG!!!!! #YANGYANG" (Tweet). Retrieved August 29, 2019 – via Twitter.
  329. ^ Roose, Kevin (February 10, 2018). "His 2020 Campaign Message: The Robots Are Coming". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  330. ^ Tommy Chong [@tommychong] (August 25, 2019). "Yes I support ANDREW Yang because he has a futurist view of where we are going . Andrew view is backed up with real facts" (Tweet). Retrieved August 27, 2019 – via Twitter.
  331. ^ Dominique Wilkins [@dwilkins21] (September 13, 2019). "The man with the real plan @AndrewYang #YangGang #YangGang2020 #DemocraticDebate2020 #DemocraticDebate Great JOB my man!" (Tweet). Retrieved September 14, 2019 – via Twitter.
  332. ^ Eugene Gu [@eugenegu] (September 14, 2019). "After careful consideration, I've finally made my decision. Andrew Yang 2020. Looking forward to the first Asian American President of the United States" (Tweet). Retrieved September 15, 2019 – via Twitter.
  333. ^ Bobby Kim [@bobbyhundreds] (September 7, 2019). "YANG. GANG" (Tweet). Retrieved September 24, 2019 – via Twitter.
  334. ^ Mark Schultz [@MarkSchultzy] (September 24, 2019). "I never thought I'd say this but I'm going down to register as a no-good low-down Democrat. Blaaa. Hillary's party. I'm about to puke. At least @AndrewYang isn't LEFT. He's forward" (Tweet). Archived from the original on September 25, 2019. Retrieved September 25, 2019 – via Twitter.
  335. ^ Adam22 [@adam22] (September 24, 2019). "Just formally joined the #yanggang and you should too: yang2020.com" (Tweet). Retrieved September 24, 2019 – via Twitter.
  336. ^ Christina Hoff Sommers [@CHSommers] (September 25, 2019). "I donated to his campaign. Our best hope. #YangGang Join Andrew Yang and his campaign of ideas" (Tweet). Retrieved September 26, 2019 – via Twitter.
  337. ^ Peter Boghossian [@peterboghossian] (September 25, 2019). "I also donated to his campaign. Our best hope. #YangGang Join Andrew Yang and his campaign of ideas" (Tweet). Retrieved September 26, 2019 – via Twitter.
  338. ^ Here's Why I Like Andrew Yang..., retrieved September 28, 2019
  339. ^ https://mobile.twitter.com/hannibalburess/status/1189275589997481985
  340. ^ Gage, John (April 16, 2019). "Jack Dorsey, Nicolas Cage among Andrew Yang's growing list of high-profile donors". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on July 19, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  341. ^ Ryan Higa [@TheRealRyanHiga] (September 15, 2019). "I've actually donated for the first time ever. New podcast with @AndrewYangVFA is up! Check it out on offthepillpodcast! #yanggang" (Tweet). Retrieved September 21, 2019 – via Twitter.

External links[edit]